Select Prose of Robert Southey

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Macmillan, 1916 - 436 pages
 

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Page 112 - Love had he found in huts where poor men ' lie; His daily teachers had been woods and rills, The silence that is in the starry sky. The sleep that is among the lonely hills.
Page 120 - O God ! methinks it were a happy life To be no better than a homely swain : To sit upon a hill, as I do now ; To carve out dials quaintly, point by point, Thereby to see the minutes how they run, — How many make the hour full complete, How many hours bring about the day, How many days will finish up the year, How many years a mortal man may live.
Page 190 - Never indeed was any man more contented with doing his duty in that state of life to which it had pleased God to call him.
Page 128 - A moralist perchance appears; Led, Heaven knows how! to this poor sod: And he has neither eyes nor ears; Himself his world...
Page 291 - Behold, this have I found, saith the Preacher, counting one by one, to find out the account: which yet my soul seeketh, but I find not: one man among a thousand have I found; but a woman among all those have I not found.
Page 205 - The idea of her life shall sweetly creep Into his study of imagination...
Page 202 - O, how this spring of love resembleth The uncertain glory of an April day ; Which now shows all the beauty of the sun, And by and by a cloud takes all away ! Re-enter PANTHINO.
Page 227 - Where fairest shades did hide her ; The winds blew calm, the birds did sing, The cool streams ran beside her My wanton thoughts enticed mine eye To see what was forbidden : But better memory said, fie...
Page 102 - Thy dead men shall live, together with my dead body shall they arise. Awake and sing, ye that dwell in dust; for thy dew is as the dew of herbs, and the earth shall cast out the dead.
Page 136 - But I have sinuous shells of pearly hue Within, and they that lustre have imbibed In the sun's palace-porch, where when unyoked His chariot-wheel stands midway in the wave : Shake one and it awakens, then apply Its polish'd lips to your attentive ear, And it remembers its august abodes, And murmurs as the ocean murmurs there.

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