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Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. What is the explanation for such an increase as that?

Colonel GALLOWAY. I am taking this information out of a tabulation which was involved in a classified file that has a number of different items, and I may be picking up incorrect figures. I would like to give you the detailed information on that later.

Mr. Taber. There is nothing classified about barracks and dormitories; is there?

Colonel GALLOWAY. Not a thing.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. You are here to justify the item. It looks out of reason to me.

Colonel GALLOWAY. The reason for the higher cost than at other locations, if they are higher, is the remote location of this Dugway area, and we anticipate the higher costs because of that.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Why is not that reflected in the B.O. Q. and the dormitories?

Colonel GALLOWAY. I will have to give you a revised list on the prices for these particular elements sir.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I will be glad to have anything that you can give me. It is up to you to justify it; not me.

Colonel GALLOWAY. I would like to give you a detailed breakdown of the $1,157,100 for the B. O. Q. barracks and the civilian dormitories.

(The following information was furnished for the record:)

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Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. How many miles of road are you going to put in here, and at what cost?

Colonel GALLOWAY. I would like to furnish that information to you at the same time.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. You do not have it with you?

Colonel GALLOWAY. No; not to be applied to this particular increment.

(Information requested is as follows:) Total road requirement for Dugway Proving Ground consists of 33 miles of new roads and repair of 65 miles of existing roads. This increment will provide repair for about 5 miles of road at a cost of $15,000.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I do not see how we can judge intelligently unless we have the figures. What is the over-all authorization for this project?

Colonel Galloway. $8,695,300.
Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Have you had an appropriation?

Colonel GALLOWAY. There is an appropriation provided for in the
regular appropriation bill now before the Congress.
Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. How much?
Colonel GALLOWAY. $5,278,000.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. In other words, you are asking for the total authorization between the two?

Colonel GALLOWAY. Yes.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. How long is it going to take you to spend the $8,600,000?

Colonel GALLOWAY. I would estimate that it would take from 18 months to 2 years.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. So, you will not spend all of it in the fiscal

year 1951 ?

Colonel GALLOWAY. No. We expect to obligate it in that year. Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. What is the reason for requesting it all now?

Colonel GALLOWAY. We intend to obligate it all, sir, and get the construction work started within this present year.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. You figure that you need the whole amount or a part of it in contract authorization?

Colonel Galloway. Probably a part could be in contract authorization and would be sufficient for the purpose.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. How much do you think you will actually spend in 1951?

Colonel GALLOWAY. I would have to figure that out in little more detail. I would say in the neighborhood of 50 percent.

Mr. TABER. How big are these buildings—the laboratories and the operation buildings?

Colonel GALLOWAY. I am unable to give you that information at the present time. I will furnish a detailed breakdown.

(The information requested is as follows:) The item of $1,077,021 comprises 13 buildings, a 50-foot steel tower, and 6 miles of barbed-wire fencing. The buildings range in area between 120 square feet at 7,600 square feet, having an aggregate area of 31,100 square feet.

CAMP DETRICK, MD. Mr. SHEPPARD. We will now take up the next item, "Camp Detrick, Md., reflected on page 56 of the justifications, and I see that you are making a request for $1,544,500. We will insert in the record at this point the prepared justifications:

Camp Detrick, Md. Civilian dormitory (50 civilians).

$174, 500 Meteorological building

181, 400 Maintenance shops (E-1)

300, 100 Munition and surveillance building

30, 000 Crop development storage shed.

9, 000 Piiot plant for crop studies.

373, 500 Chemical and physical laboratory

476, 000 Total..

1, 544, 500 Civilian dormitory (50 civilians) (includes $600 for construction of administrative

telephone system), $174,500

Existing civilian bachelor quarters on this post are of temporary type construction and are far short of the number required. Most of the civilians employed on the post are scientifically trained and were imported from distant localities. Baltimore, 50 miles away, is beyond economical commuting distance and it is necessary to provide adequate on-post quarters if trained civilians are to be retained for research.

Meterological building (includes $1,500 for construction of administrative telephone

system), $181,400 This project proposes the construction of a permanent type two-story building of approximately 9,000 square feet for meterological studies in connection with research and development projects at this installation. The building will be provided with space for offices, vaults, darkrooms, charting rooms, laboratory, utility room, toilets, lockers, observation towers, and a parking area. In addition, the necessary utility services will be installed and connected.

This construction is essential to permit the continuation of the expanded biological and chemical warfare research program being conducted at this station. Meteorological studies are now being performed in temporary buildings which are inadequate in size and other requirements. In addition, these buildings were not designed for this type of work nor can they be rehabilitated for this purpose. Maintenance shops (F-1) (includes $300 for construction of administrative telephone

system), $300,100 This project proposes the construction of a one-story permanent type building of approximately 27,610 square feet with a ceiling height of approximately 25 feet, for use as machine shop, plumbing shop, sheet-metal shop, welding shop, electric shop, and offices. Included with this shop building will be other pertinent facilities and utility services.

The present shop facilities are located in temporary buildings that are so widely dispersed that coordination and efficiency of operations is not possible. In addition, these buildings were not designed for use as shops and the lay-out of shop equipment further decreases the efficiency and prevents maximum progress in the work performed. The research program assigned to this installation requires these shops in order to satisfy the progress desired by higher authority. Munition and surveillance building, $30,000

This project proposes the construction of a permanent type, air conditioned building for use in the development of munitions and to study these munitions under varying conditions. The building will consist of a total floor area of 35,500 square feet of which 31,900 is classified as “clean” and the remainder "contaminated.” The structure will provide space for offices, surveillance laboratory, test chamber, and surveillance storage cells of varying temperatures. In addition, the building will be provided with necessary utilities and service connections.

The research and development program at this installation requires the construction of these facilities for the development of munitions and study of those munitions under varying temperatures with controlled humidity. The surveillance factors in the completed product can only be controlled and results determined in specially constructed facilities having complete temperature regulation for independent uses and other atmospheric and scientific controls. The construction of a munition building of 28,000 square feet and a surveillance building of 6,000 square feet at estimated costs of $501,000 and $120,000, respectively, was authorized by Public Law 564, Eighty-first Congress. The Munition Building is included in the fiscal year 1951 appropriation bill. Further study of this part of the research requirements revealed that many economies and greater efficiency could be obtained by the construction of a single building for these activities since work performed in each is closely allied. As a result, the cost of construction will be reduced to $531,000, including collateral equipment. In view of this fact, no additional authorization is necessary but additional funds in the amount of $30,000 are required to complete the facilities. Crop development storage shed, $9,000

This project proposes the construction of a permanent type addition of approximately 2,000 square feet to building No. 322 to provide adequate storage facilities for farm implements and stock feed.

The present facilities provide space for the storage of stock feed. In view of the expanding research program, these facilities are now inadequate. In addition, there are no storage facilities for the housing of farm implements such as tractors, harrows, plows, seeders, spreaders, etc. This equipment is now being stored in the open and is subject to rapid deterioration. There is no building at this installation which could be utilized for this type of storage. This project was authorized by Public Law 564, Eighty-first Congress, at an estimated cost of $17,000. Due to a reduction in the qulaity of construotion, the cost has been reduced to $9,000. Pilot plant for crop studies (includes $2,000 for construction of administrative tele

phone system), $373,500 This project proposes the construction of a permanent type, air conditioned building of approximately 11,400 square feet for use in the study and research on the diseases of crops. The construction will include special equipment, air filters for air intakes, equipment for the treatment of exhaust air, humidity controls and glass over a part of the roof. In addition, the building will be provided with the necessary utility services and connections.

This facility building is required to carry out highly classified research and development work in the field of crop control. Crops under study must be isolated from one another, and must be carefully controlled to prevent all possibility of the escape of infectious diseases of crops. The growing, harvesting, and processing must be performed under controlled conditions in a completely isolated building. There is no existing structure which can be used for these studies and the construction of this pilot plant is essential to the successful prosecution of the important research and development programs at this station. This project was authorized by Public Law 564, Eighty-first Congress, at an estimated cost of $523,000 and was based on a building of approximately 12,500 square feet. After more detailed study of the special equipment required for this structure and preparation of preliminary designs of the building, it was determined that the capacity could be reduced to 11,400 aquare feet and the cost, iucluding collateral equipment; would not exceed $373,500. Chemical and physical laboratory (includes $3,000 for construction of administrative

telephone system), $476,000 This project comprises the construction of a permament type two-story, airconditioned building of approximately 43,000 square feet; 25,800 square feet of the total floor area will be classified as “contaminated” and the remainder classified as "clean.". This structure will provide space for offices, chemical laboratory, high-pressure laboratory, cold rooms, incubator rooms, animal rooms, radio-isotope laboratory, and electro-phoresia laboratory. In addition, the building will include utilities and service connections.

The research and development program at this installation requires the construction of laboratory facilities for research work in chemistry, bacterial nutrition, pathology, physiology, pharmacology, and the development of protective equipment against certain chemical agents. This work is now being performed in temporary buildings without adequate facilities for accomplishing maximum results. Further delays are due to the fact that these buildings are widely dispersed throughout the installation, thus preventing the efficient utilization of scientific personnel. The construction of a basic science building of approximately 20,000 square feet and research and development laboratory of 30,000 square feet was authorized by Public Law 564, Eighty-first Congress, at estimated costs of $426,000 and $376,000, respectively. The research and development laboratory was included in the fiscal year 1951 appropriation bill. Further study of this part of the research requirements revealed that many economies and greater efficiency could be obtained by the construction of a single building for these activities since the work performed in each is closely allied. During the study, the name of this facility was changed as indicated above. Based on more complete designs, this laboratory is estimated to cost $902,000.

General BARRIGER. This is for a series of projects at Camp Detrick. It is a part of the research and development program consisting of a dormitory, the necessity for which is that we cannot get the type of people that we must have to live in the facilities available. There will be a meteorological building which our check shows does not duplicate any existing facilities. Then there will be maintenance shops for use as machine shops, plumbing shops, sheet-metal shops, .and so forth.

Mr. SHEPPARD. I see that you have an item down here "Pilot plant for crop studies." What are you boys doing in the agricultural field?

General BARRIGER. The chemical people can give you that in detail. Major SHEPPARD. Off the record. (Discussion off the record.)

69887–50—pt. 2-34

CONSTRUCTION COSTS

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I call attention that in the discussion of the previous item, Dugway, Utah, you said that the cost of constructing the dormitory was high because of the remote locality. The cost of the dormitory there figured out something less than $3,000 and here you have a dormitory for civilians which figures about $3,500. There is something wrong with these costs.

Colonel ĞALLOWAY. I would like permission to give you as I said revised figures on Dugway costs for the particular items of dormitories, BOQ barracks, and so on.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. If $3,000 is high at Dugway, $3,500 certainly is much higher in Maryland.

Colonel ĞALLOWAY. That is certainly correct, sir, but the dormitory at Camp Detrick will probably be for higher priced civilian scientific employees and will provide better facilities than that at Dugway.

Mr. TABER. You have maintenance shops in here. Are these buildings already up? Is this set-up already in operation?

Colonel GALLOWAY. No, sir. This is for the construction of a new maintenance shop.

Mr. TABER. A construction item?

Colonel GALLOWAY. Yes. We have some maintenance shops there that are in temporary buildings.

Mr. TABER. Why will they not do instead of building the new ones?

Colonel Galloway. First of all, sir, they do not offer protection for the operations going on within the maintenance shops. In the second place, they are so widely dispersed around the base that economy and efficiency in operation are well nigh impossible.

Mr. TABER. Why was not that thought about when they were put up?

Colonel GALLOWAY. I think that, just like Topsy, "they growed up," and were not intended for that purpose.

Mr. TABER. You have a chemical and physical laboratory. Is there not one there now?

Major SHEPPARD. Yes; we have a very small laboratory building which is not adequate for our needs. This building is designed to meet the needs that we have. The very small physical laboratory facilities we have now are most inadequate for our program. As the general has brought out, these facilities have been inspected by the interested members of the Research and Development Board and their approval of our program is based upon an inspection of our facilities.

MIDWEST CHEMICAL DEPOT, ARK. Mr. SHEPPARD. We will now take up the next item reflected on page 61 of the justifications, Midwest Chemical Depot, Ark., where I see that you are asking for $551,000.

We will insert in the record at this point the prepared justification. (The justification referred to is as follows:)

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