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study. We will inform the Congress as quickly as possible of any necessary revision in the requirements we are presenting now.

Our goal for the remainder of fiscal year 1951 is to continue the normal programs for fiscal year 1951 which have already been requested, to meet the requirements of the Korean situation, and to improve the global posture of the Armed Forces. It is essential that in these times our readiness should be somewhat greater than that which existed prior to the outbreak of hostilities in Korea. It will include minimum essential forces for maintaining the security of Japan. It is

my belief that we can build up our forces to such an extent that they will be effective insurance against a further breach of the peace. And, if they are not successful as insurance, we shall at least be that much more ready to meet a new attack.

Each service, I am sure, will present in detail the increases in men and material which the supplemental appropriations may provide. However, if there are any questions which you would like to ask me, I would be glad to try to answer them.

Mr. Mahon. General Bradley, may we have full and complete assurance that the Joint Chiefs will make known to the Congress and to this committee in particular any additional requirements necessary for the security of the United States ?

General BRADLEY. I believe that we can give that. The machinery for that, of course, is the Secretary of Defense and the President. We are the military advisers to the Secretary of Defense and the President. I am not sure whether I have the authority to come to Congress or not, but certainly we would make our thoughts known to the Secretary of Defense and the President, and I feel certain they would present those

Mr. Mahon. And, if you are called before the committee, you will give us the benefit of your best judgment?

General BRADLEY. Yes.
Mr. MAHON. Off the record.
(Discussion off the record.)

to you.

DISCUSSIONS OFF THE RECORD

Mr. PLUMLEY. I was not satisfied with the lack of opportunity which I had to question the Secretary of Defense with reference to one matter in particular. That is with regard to the extent to which the general public should be advised concerning the matters which he repeatedly said would be off the record concerning which the American people should be advised if the American people are going to be called upon to support the program which he offers.

I think, General Bradley, that you ought to offer some explanation or some reason why th matters were discussed off the record. Most of the things were discussed off the record in which the American people are vitally concerned if they are going to support your effort.

General BRADLEY. Mr. Plumley, we agree that just as many things as possible should be told the American people. However, there have been a lot of things discussed here this afternoon which would very materially help an enemy and might expose many of our people to loss of life, and even expose our efforts to failure.

I believe that the American people, realizing that, would willingly delegate the judgment to their leaders here, surrounding this table, and depend upon you to make the proper decision based upon information which I think they would willingly forego because of the jeopardy to our country and our boys' lives.

Mr. PLUMLEY. General Bradley, I accept your statement.
Mr. MAHON. Mr. Taber.

STRENGTH OF MILITARY FORCES ON DATE OF INVASION OF KOREA

Mr. TABER. The Secretary in his statement said: The over-all combat potential of the Armed Forces was at a higher level on June 25, the day the Republic of Korea was invaded, than has been the case at any time since the postwar demobilization was completed.

Upstairs on the floor just a few minutes before these hearings started I understood Mr. Vinson, the chairman of the Armed Services Committee, to say that that situation was at that time at its lowest ebb. I am wondering who is correct.

General BRADLEY. Mr. Taber, I think a lot depends upon the interpretation and the way this thing was figured. I would prefer that you ask Secretary Johnson himself to interpret that sentence, than for me to try to tell you what he had in mind.

Mr. TABER. That was the question that I intended to ask Secretary Johnson, because, frankly, it has disturbed me to have Mr. Vinson make one statement and the Secretary another.

Mr. McNEIL. May I suggest that I submit to Mr. Johnson the question which Mr. Taber has asked, and ask him to insert the answer in the record ?

(The following information was furnished later by the office of the Secretary of Defense:)

The applicable excerpt from the statement by Chairman Vinson of the Armed Services Committee of the House Appropriations Committee on the floor of the House in support of the bill extending enlistments was to the effect that while our sea power is greater than that of Russia and her satellites and our strategic air power is unmatched anywhere in the world, we were seriously short at this critical moment in comparison with Russia and her satellites in ground troops, tactical air, aircraft carriers, etc.

Earlier in this hearing I pointed out that the over-all combat potential of our armed forces was at a higher level on June 25—the day Korea was invadedthan had been the case at any time since postwar demobilization had been completed.

The two statements above are not inconsistent since Chairman Vinson was apparently comparing our present forces with those of our potential enemies, but he did not touch upon the question of whether our forces were stronger at the beginning of the Korean invasion than at any time since demobilization was completed.

(Off record discussion.)

Mr. MAHON. Are there any further questions of General Bradley! If not we thank you gentlemen very much. You have been very kind and patient.

WEDNESDAY, July 26, 1950.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

WITNESSES

MAJ. GEN. G. H. DECKER, CHIEF, BUDGET DIVISION, OFFICE OF THE

COMPTROLLER COL. J. B. HESS, CHIEF, ESTIMATES AND FUNDING BRANCH, OFFICE

OF THE COMPTROLLER COL. R. S. MOORE, SPECIAL ASSISTANT TO THE ASSISTANT SECRE

TARY OF DEFENSE, COMPTROLLER MAJ. GEN. C. E. BYERS, DEPUTY ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, G-1 MAJ. GEN. A. R. BOLLING, DEPUTY ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, G-2 MAJ. GEN. R. E. DUFF, DEPUTY ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, G-3 MAJ. GEN. W. O. REEDER, DEPUTY ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, G-4 LT. COL. D. S. DALEY, BUDGET OFFICER, OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT

CHIEF OF STAFF, G1

Mr. MAHON. Gentlemen, we will resume our hearing on the supplemental budget request for 10.5 billion dollars.

Yesterday we had the Secretary of Defense and the Secretaries of Army, Navy, and Air Force and the Joint Chiefs of Staff and others to testify in connection with over-all policy. Today we will consider the requirements for the Army. We will place in the record the appropriate parts of House Document No. 657.

(The matter referred to is as follows:)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE

CONTINGENCIES

For emergencies and extraordinary expenses arising in the Department of Defense, to be expended on the approval or authority of the Secretary of Defense and such expenses may be accounted for solely on his certificate that the expenditures were necessary for confidential military purposes ; $50,000,000.

EMERGENCY FUND

For transfer by the Secretary of Defense, with the approval of the Bureau of the Budget, to any appropriation for military functions under the Department of Defense available for research and development: or industrial mobilization, to be merged with and to be available for the same purposes, and for the same time period, as the appropriation to which transferred, $190,000,000.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

EXPEDITING PRODUCTION

To enable the Secretary of the Army, without reference to Revised Statutes 1136, as amended, to expedite the production of equipment and supplies for the Army for emergency national defense purposes, including all of the objects and purposes specified under each of the appropriations available to the Department of the Army during the fiscal year 1951, for procurement or production of equipment or supplies, for erection of structures, or for acquisition of land; the furnishing of Government-owned facilities at privately owned plants; the procurement - and training of civilian personnel in connection with the production of equipment and material and the use and operation thereof; and for any other purposes which in the discretion of the Secretary of the Army are desirable in expediting production for military purposes; $125,000,000.

For additional amounts for appropriations under the Department of Defense for the fiscal year 1951, as follows:

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY-MILITARY FUNCTIONS

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE ARMY

“Contingencies of the Army", $10,000,000; .

FINANCE DEPARTMENT

Finance Service, Army:

Pay of the Army”, $193,090,000;
"Travel of the Army”, $50,800,000;
"Finance service”, $4,030,000;

QUARTERMASTER CORPS

Quartermaster Service, Army:

“Welfare of enlisted men”, $2,564,000;
"Subsistence of the Army', $176,743,000;
“Regular supplies of the Army', $42,930,000;
"Clothing and equipage”, $152,817,000 ;
"Incidental expenses of the Army”, $33,026,000;

TRANSPORTATION CORPS

"Transportation service, Army", $258,823,000;

SIGNAL CORPS

“Signal service of the Army", $148,752,000;

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT

"Medical and Hospital Department”, $11,446,000;

CORPS OF ENGINEERS

“Engineer service, Army", $329,115,000;

ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT

“Ordnance service and supplies, Army", $1,438,221,000;

CHEMICAL CORPS

"Chemical service, Army”, $31,853,000;

ARMY TRAINING

Army training”, $2,667,000;

CIVILIAN COMPONENTS

Army National Guard”, $17,648,000;
Organized reserves”, $6,506,000;
"Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps”, $9,000,000 ;

DEPARTMENTAL SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Salaries, Department of the Army:

"Office of the Secretary of the Army: Secretary of the Army, Under Secretary of the Army, Assistant Secretaries of the Army and other personal services”, $163,137;

“Office of the Chief of Staff", $1,022,160;
“Adjutant General's Office”, $2,384,894;
“Office of the Inspector General”, $16,100;
“Office of the Judge Advocate General”, $55,307 ;
“Office of the Chief of Finance”, $53,670;

“Office of the Quartermaster General", $1,412,202;
“Office of the Chief of Transportation”, $340,648;
"Office of the Chief Signal Officer”, $212,680;
“Office of the Provost Marshal General”, $16,926;
“Office of the Surgeon General”, $57,424;
“Office of the Chief of Engineers”, $349,280;
"Office of the Chief of Ordnance”, $909,244;
"Office of Chief, Chemical Corps”, $106,808;
“Office of Chief of Chaplains”, $11,520;
"Contingent expenses, Department of the Army”, $7,011,000.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY-CIVIL FUNCTIONS

SIGNAL CORPS

Alaska Communication System :

"Operation, maintenance, improvement, etc.", $3,717,000 ;

“Construction, etc.", $676,000. General Decker, we will rely upon you to arrange and supervise the presentation of the Army. How would you like to proceed?

General DECKER. Sir, I would like to proceed first of all by giving the general picture of the problem we face in the Army and the steps we have taken to solve it.

I have with me the representatives of the various general staff divisions of the Army who will be prepared to elaborate on whatever I have said to the extent that the committee desires; following which I expect to call the estimating agencies in turn to defend in detail their own appropriations.

Mr. Mahon. Do you have a prepared statement ?
General DECKER. I have, sir.
Mr. Mahon. I note you have some charts before us.

Will you use those charts in connection with your prepared statement?

General DECKER. I shall.

Mr. MAHON. Would it be any convenience or in the interest of orderly procedure for you to complete your statement before we have a question period ?

General DECKER. I would much prefer to do so; yes, sir.

Mr. Mahon. All right, gentlemen. Let us permit General Decker to proceed to the completion of his statement after which we will interrogate him.

You may proceed, General.

GENERAL STATEMENT

General DECKER. Mr. Chairman, gentlemen : The Department of the Army is presenting to you today its first supplemental budget estimate for fiscal year 1951. This estimate is to provide for operations caused by the emergency situation described by President Truman in his message to the Congress on the 19th of July. The total amount requested in the military budget is $3,059,154,000. This figure, when added to our regular 1951 estimate as reported by the Senate Appropriations Committee, totals $7,147,531,521.

The additional funds requested are intended to accomplish two main purposes. Namely, to enable the Army to meet the immediate situation in Korea and to provide for an early increase in its combat readiness.

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