Consumerism in Twentieth-Century Britain: The Search for a Historical Movement

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 13, 2003 - Business & Economics - 382 pages
"This book is the first comprehensive history of consumerism as an organised social and political movement. Matthew Hilton offers a ground-breaking account of consumer movements, ideologies and organisations in twentieth-century Britain. He argues that in organisations such as the Co-operative movement and the Consumers' Association individual concern with what and how we spend our wages led to forms of political engagement too often overlooked in existing accounts of twentieth-century history. He explores how the consumer and consumerism came to be regarded by many as a third force in society with the potential to free politics from the perceived stranglehold of the self-interested actions of employers and trade unions. Finally he recovers the visions of countless consumer activists who saw in consumption a genuine force for liberation for women, the working class and new social movements as well as a set of ideas often deliberately excluded from more established political organisations."--Jacket.

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About the author (2003)

Matthew Hilton is Lecturer in Modern British History at the University of Birmingham and the author of Smoking in British Popular Culture, 1800-2000 (2000).

Matthew Hilton is Lecturer in Modern British History at the University of Birmingham and the author of Smoking in British Popular Culture, 1800-2000 (2000).

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