The Ancient Cathedral of Cornwall Historically Surveyed, Volume 2

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Page 312 - O thou that, with surpassing glory crown'd, Look'st from thy sole dominion, like the god Of this new world, at whose sight all the stars Hide their diminish'd heads, to thee I call, But with no friendly voice, and add thy name, 0 sun, to tell thee how I hate thy beams, That bring to my remembrance from what state 1 fell, how glorious once above thy sphere...
Page 354 - Merchant man (which shall at this time be nameless) that bought the Contents of two noble Libraries for forty shillings price ; a shame it is to be spoken.
Page 320 - Quidquid Gregorius summus docet, et Leo papa; Basilius quidquid, Fulgentius atque, coruscant Cassiodorus item, Chrysostomus atque Johannes. Quidquid et Athelmus docuit, quid Beda magister...
Page 178 - They were calculated to produce the effect of the louver, or open lantern, in the inside ; and, on this account, were originally continued open almost to the covering, It is generally supposed, that the tower of Winchester cathedral, which is remarkably thick and short, was left as the foundation for a projected spire : but this idea never entered into the plan of the architect. Nearly the whole...
Page 242 - ... foiled, than in other ferial days, as in fastening and making their booths and stalls, bearing and carrying, lifting and placing their wares outward and homeward, as though they did nothing remember the horrible defiling of their souls in buying and selling, with many deceitful lies and false perjury with drunkenness and strifes, and so specially withdrawing themselves and their servants from divine service...
Page 37 - was not desired by the Cornish ; but forced upon them by the tyranny of England, at a time when the English language was yet unknown in Cornwall. This act of tyranny was at once gross barbarity to the Cornish people, and a death blow to the Cornish language.
Page 341 - Wresehil is al of tymbre. The castelle it self is motid aboute on 3 partes, the 4 parte is dry where the entre is ynto the castelle. The castelle is al of very fair and greate squarid stone both withyn and withowte, wherof (as sum hold opinion) much was brought owt of Fraunce.
Page 320 - Invenies alios perplures, lector, ibidem Egregios studiis, arte et sermone magistros, Plurima qui claro scripsere volumina sensu ; Nomina sed quorum praesenti in carmine scribi Longius est visum, quam plectri postulet usus.
Page 96 - JLirictnna however," he writes, "went away from the neighbourhood of" her sisters, in a spirit probably of stronger abstraction from the world with all its ties, yet still kept within the confines of Cornwall. She went up into that angular part on the north-east, •which was subdued by the Saxons long before the rest of the country, by its peninsular kind of separation from it, as it exhibits a much greater number of Saxon appellations for places than any other district in Cornwall, and indeed has...
Page 320 - Historic! veteres, Pompeius, Plinius, ipse Acer Aristoteles, rhetor quoque Tullius ingens. Quid quoque Sedulius, vel quid canit ipse Juvencus, Alcimus et Clemens, Prosper, Paulinus, Arator, Quid Fortunatus, vel quid Lactantius edunt.

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