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VALE TUDI

$I WARD, Miss, her Elegy on Captain TIMES, a Comedy,

245

Cook,

458 TRELAWNEY's Letter,

326

SHAKESPEAR. See JOHNSON. Şce TRIAL of the Capt. of the Ardent, 488
STEEVENS,

TRIAL of Stratton, &c. for the Death of

SHEPHERDISS of the Alps, 172

Lord Pigot,

489

SHERIDAN's Observations on Sir Wil. TROUBADOURS, History of,

490
liam Blacklone, &c.

359
Trusler's Husbandry,

487
SHILLITO's Sea-Fight, a Poem, 247

TUTOR of Truth,

324
SILGE of Gibraltar, a Farce, 411 Two Discourfes, &c.

497

Sixe's Military Instructor,

87

V.

SINON's Itinerary,

93

J ALETUDINARIAN's Bath Guide,
SKETCH of a Farce,
67

352

SKETCH of the Controversy between Dr. VAN SWINDEN's Treatlle on the Aise

Priestley and his Opponents, 223

rora Borealis,

310

BEETCA of the Times,

497

VIGETABLES. See INGENHOUSE.

SMELT's Speech,

317

View of the Evidence relative to the
-as publihed by Anonymous, ib. American War,

70

Sayden's Sermon at Hackney, on To.

of the Earth,

157

Leracion,

413

- of the Dutch Settlements in the
SPANISH Invasion, a Poem, 276

East Indies,

491
SPECULATION, a Poem, by Anstey, 474 of Universal History. Seç ME-
SPEECHLEY's Treatise on the Culture of

HEGAN,

the Pine-apple, &c.

354

VINCENT'S Narrative of the late Dif,

STATE of the East India Company, 244 turbances,

502
STLIVENS: new Edition of Shakespear, VINDICATION of the Opposition to the

12, 257
Roman Catholic Bill,

501
STRICTORIS on Pamphlet entitled, Vision,, on the Death of Lord Lyttelion,
Faas, &c.
485

87

STUART'S Hifory of the Etablishment UNANIMITY, a Paem, (anonym.) 379

of the Reformation in Scotland, 337

by Macaulay,

409

SUBSTANCE of the Speeches in the VOLUNTEERS, a Comedy,

411

H. of C. On Mr. Burke's Notice,

84
SULLIVAN, Mr. his Thoughts on Mar. ALPER'S Sermon on the Perfec
tial Law,

87

tion of the Cbriftian Chara&ter,

SUPPLEMENT to Burgoyne's State of the

415

Expedition,

492 WALKER, Lady Mary, her Observations
SUTTON Abbey, a Novel, 324 on Burke's Biil,

318
SYSTEM,

168 WALKER's Speech at the Westminiter

T.

Forum,

405

TASKER's Ode to the warlike Ger WALTERS's Poems,

494
nius of Great Britain, ad Edit. 66 WANDESFORDE. See COMBER.

Ode to the Memory of the Bishop WASHINGTON, General.. See POETI.
of Sodor and Man,

110

TAXATION, Letters on,

83

WATERING Meadows, Treatise on, 456

Terms of Conciliation,

WHITCOMB's Sermon at Welesby, 413

THETFORD, History of,

299

WILLIAM of Worcester's kinerary, 93

THICKNESSE'S Valetudinarian's Bath WILLIAM and Nancy, a Ballad Farce,

Guide,

352

371

THOUGHTS on the Extension of Penal WILLIAM and Lucy, an Opera, 323

Laws,

86 WILLIAMS's Lectures iu Margaret-Street,

on Martial Law,

87

1

on the County Petitions, 242

concluded,

97

on the Treaty between Go- WILLIAMSON's Sermon at Oxford on
vernment and the E. Ind. Comp. 244 the King's Acceslion,

414
on a Fund for the Improve. Waseman's Epiftola Commerciales, 94

ment of Credit, &c.

WYCLIFFE on Government,

THORNTON. See HAYLEY.

WYNNI, Dr. Letter to,

248
TXROSBY's Memoirs of Leicester,

Z.
Tickel's Epifle from Fox to Town- ORAIDA, a Tragedy,

185

Dead

170

165

316

85

488

Z

CONTENTS of the FOREIGN ARTICLES,

in the APPENDIX to this Volume.

N. B. For the CONTENTS of the Foreign Articles in the Cor.

RESPONDENCE, inserted in the Reviews for January, February,
March, April, and May, see the General Index, with whicle
tbey are incorporated.

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NNALES poetiques depuis l'Origine MEMOIRE de l'Acad Royale de Prufre,
de la Poefe Françoise, 582 &c.

582

ANQUETIL, M. his Intrigue du Cabinet,

See De GUIGNES.

c.

554

See MISSIONARILS.

BENCIVINNI's Effay on the Royal Gal- MISSIONARIES, their Memoirs con.
lery of Florence,

572 cerning the History, &c. of the Chi.
BERTHOLON de St. Lazare, his Memoir nese, Vol. V, and VI.

519
concerning a Counter-Earibquake, and a More Letters of an English Traveller,
Counter. Volcano,
556

548

CHOISEUL's Travels through Greece, MOREAU, M. his Moral and Political

Chap. V.

517

Discourses on the Hift. of France, 583

DECOUVERTES de M. Marat, &c. 546 Music. See DELABORDE.
Dz GUIGNES, M. his Inquiry into the

See OBSERVATIONS.

Foundations of the Ancient History of OBSERVATIONS sur la Mufique, 541

China,

505

OBSERVATIONS sur la Nature, & sur

DELABORDE's Essay on Mufic, 577

Traitement de la RAGE,

564
Du Luc's Ltiters, philosophical and mo- OTAHEITI, Effay on,

581

ral,

527

Paul, M. his Hift. of the Pruffian Acad.

Deux Memoires. See GUINEE.

Royal, relative to Medicine, &c. 582

DISSERTATION contre l'Ufage de Bouil. PLANELLI on the Education of Princes,

lons de Viandes dans les Maladies Fe-

574

briles,

571 PORTAL, M. his Observations on Madina

EPILOGO, &c. See RATTI.

ness,

564

Essay concerning the Band of Otaheiti, PRINCIPES de Morale, de Politique,

581 &c. sur l'Hift. de France, 383

FLORENTINE Gallery, Account of, 572 Ratti's Account of Mengs,

564

GUENEL, Abbé, bis Memoits concern- RECHERCHES sur le Commerce,

ning the Fertility of Palestine, 565 REFLEXIONS H ftoriques, See WEUVES.

HISTORY of the Royal Society of Medi- SAGGIO Hiftorico, &c.

572

cine,

S11

Saggio sull Eduazione de Principi,

of Man,

574

HEYNE's Collection of Discourses on SAMMLUNG Antiquarischer, &c. $80

Antiquity,

$80 SHERLOCK's Letters. See More.

HUNGARY, Comp. Hift of, 580

VOYAGE Pittoresque de la Grece, Ch. V.

INQUIRIES concerning Commerce, 558

517

LAUDUN's Diff. on the pernicious Effects

dans les Mers de Inde, &c. 542

of Flesh Broths in Fevers,

571 WIUVES, M. his Historical Reflections

LI GENTIL's Voyage in the Indian on the Commerce of France,

553
Seas,

542 WINDISH, M. C. Goit. his Hift, of the

MARAT's Discoveries in Electricity, &c. Hungarians,

$80

540

THE

MONTHLY REVIEW,

For JANUARY, 1780.

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Art. 1. Ledures on the universal Principles and Duties of Religion and

Morality, as they have been read in Margaret-Street, Cavendish,
Square, in the Years, 1776 and 1777. By the Rev. David
Williams. Printed for the Author, and sold by Dodsley, &c.
2 vols. 4to. Subscription il. 15. 1779.

R. Williams is a gentleman of so fingular a cast of cha

racter and principles, that we Mhould be tempted to pay z particular attention to him on that account; supposing he were even more deficient, than we imagine him to be, in qualities of higher importance and estimation.

The introduction to this curious performance opens with a definition of insanity. We did not immediately perceive the Author's design in setting off fo oddly. We doubted not,

however, of some design, at the bottom: Mr. Williams seldom 12. says or does any thing, even in the moments of the purest simpli

city, without some reason.

It appears then, that Mr. Williams gives his Readers a definition of insanity, for the sole purpose of convincing them that he himself, however extraordinary, is not mad.

6 The institution of a form of public worship (says he) on those principles which arise immediately from nature, in a community where almost every thing in morals, religion and polity, are decided upon by authority :--the resolution of a man to be the author of it, whọ doth not covet sufferings, and has not the dispositions of a martyr :--the idea of leaving the plan to suc. ceed by its merits in a country where every thing is rendered successful by money or protection :--these have been urged as proofs of insanity: and perhaps they may be. But the applica. tion of them to me hath been owing to an unacquaintance with the following facts, which imply the history of an institution of public worship on the universal principles of morals. VOL. LXII.

B В:

! I quitted "I quitted the customary offices of the profession to which I was educated, for reasons which have been already aligned (viz. in the Appendix to the second edition of Eliays on public Worship!. But either because religion is essential to the human mind; or because the habits of a profeffion are, like all others, very difficult to be suspended - I could not reft satisfied out of my employment. On intimating my fituation, I had hopes given me of the most flattering encouragement. But on seeing my plan extended beyond the limits of the Christian church [i. e. seeing the plan was purely a deistical one-as the Author Thould have said in plain language), they were withdrawn, and my papers were put up : for I had none of the views of Re. formers and Apoftles : and it was my intention not to engage, until it appeared to be for the service and pleasure of others, as well as my own.'

This confession is a very frank one: and we give him full and unreserved credit for the truth of it. The children of light are not always wise in their generation. But Mr. Williams, who had renounced all pretensions to their character, was resolved not to act on their plan. The heroic pallion of soulfaving (as Lord Shaftesbury ironically terined it) mingled not with his principles, and had no share at all in the inititution in Margaret-Streel.' AOS T8 5W- Give me where to stand (as Mr. Williams might be supposed to say)— But I will have solid ground: or I will lock up all my initruments. I have not the wings of the Apostles. I cannot work by their faith ; nor live on their hopes.'

But though Mr. Williams did not chuse to venture his bor. tom on the fanciful stocks of reformation, nor to launch his vessel, like a vifionary A poftle, into the air ;--though he wished like a prudent man of this generation, to serve and please himself as well as other people; yet he recoils at the idea of having his plan injuriously degraded,' by seeing it claffed amongit

the unadvised projects of an individual for his own emolu. ment and advarttage.'

After reprobating the designs of fanatics and missionaries, in their attempts to reform churches and kingdoms, he tells his Readers, that his business hath not any thing in common with such designs. The liturgy on the universal Principles of Res ligion and Morality, was first intended as a gratification and pleasure to a fmall number of persons who could worship on no other; to be publicly used, on the fuppofition that it would afford' the fame gratification and pleasure to great numbers in the same circumstances, and bring me fome recompense for my trouble in ufig it.

• When the design was made public, the expectations entertained by some, and the apprehensions of others, were cqually

ill-founded and extravagant. Nay, the opinions formed on the steps which have been hitherto taken, are not the most judicious. Experiments may be to the public as fallacious as fables: they often occafion as many errors, and are always expected to prove too much. If the Institution in Margaret-Street were only to prove, that a liturgy may be drawn up, on principles which all mankind acknowledge, and may be used without offence, even to sectaries and bigots, it would deserve consideration and respect. A bishop quitting his diocese, and attended by both Houses of Parliament, in the same experiment, might have given it more eclat, but not more certainty. In the present case, it is a discovery made by a private man, at some risque, and at some expence. It holds up to the world a fact which hath at all times been deemed incredible; the importance of which to morals and policy may be understood, when men raise their thoughts from the elementary to the intellectual world; and the benefits which may be enjoyed in future by persons who might not have undergone the apprehensions, anxieties, and inconveniencies by which it hath been ascertained.

That good men of all nations and all religions :-that believers in Mofes, Christ, and Mahomet, Free-thinkers, Deists, and even Atheists, who acknowledge beneficent principles in nature, may unite in a form of public worship, on all the great and most important truths of piety and morality, can no more be a question : for it is demonstrated; not by the arts of logic, or the declamations of oratory in books, but by a stated, public service, to which any man may have recourse for satisfaction.'

Mr. Williams proceeds to state the use of his discovery for the benefit of preachers and politicians. The principal use arises from the freedom of communication, which, as he observes, constitutes the bonds by which all asociations, all clubs, and all parties, are held together.' In the illustration of this profound remark, the Author hath thrown out hints which seem to mean something; but we acknowledge ourselves inable to get to the bottom of them. And in truth they must be very deep!-quite out of common reach, since several persons,' he informs us, " eminent for their knowledge in the present science of politics, have not understood him.'

For our parts, we fee nothing very extraordinary in this Gentleman's experiments or discoveries. Whether it be, that our s thoughts are not yet raised from the elementary to the intellectual world,' or that we have yet some little predilection remaining for Christianity, or from whatever cause it may arise, we presume not to determine ; but we must acknowledge, that we cannot see the great utility of this project (confessediy a Utopian one) of uniting the moft heterogenous parties, from the orthodox believer down to the speculative Atheist. No plan of

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worship,

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