The History of the Life and Reign of George the Fourth, Volume 2

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1831 - Great Britain
 

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Page 284 - My Lord, — Since last I had the honour of addressing you from this place, a series of eventful years has elapsed, but none without some mark and note of your rising glory. " The military triumphs which your valour has achieved upon the banks of the Douro and the Tagus, of the Ebro and the Garonne, have called forth the spontaneous shouts of admiring nations. Those triumphs it is needless on this day to recount. Their names...
Page 4 - Comment les deux nations les plus éclairées de l'Europe, puissantes et fortes plus que ne l'exigent leur sûreté et leur indépendance, peuvent-elles sacrifier à des idées de vaine grandeur le bien du commerce, la prospérité intérieure, le bonheur des familles? Comment ne sentent-elles pas que la paix est le premier des besoins comme la première des gloires?
Page 283 - I hope it will not be deemed presumptuous in me to take this opportunity of expressing my admiration of the great efforts made by this House and the country at a moment of unexampled pressure and difficulty, in order to support the great scale of operations by which the contest was brought to so fortunate a termination.
Page 29 - And what is the nature of the times in which we live? Look at France, and see what we have to cope with, and consider what has made her what she is. A man ! You will tell me that she was great, and powerful, and formidable, before the...
Page 252 - Your glorious conduct is beyond all human praise, and far above my reward. I know no language the world affords worthy to express it. I feel I have nothing left to say, but devoutly to offer up my prayer of gratitude to Providence, that it has, in its omnipotent bounty, blessed my country and myself with such a General. You have sent me, among the trophies of your unrivalled fame, the staff of a French Marshal, and I send you in return that of England.
Page 192 - Peel of the same day, are of opinion that, for the purpose of giving to the administration that character of efficiency and stability, and those marks of the constitutional support of the crown, which are required to enable it to act usefully...
Page 62 - That it is contrary to the. first duties of the confidential servants of the Crown to restrain themselves by any pledge, expressed or implied, from offering to the King any advice which the course of circumstances may render necessary for the welfare and security of any part of his Majesty's extensive empire.
Page 284 - I have now the honour to make my humble acknowledgments. " ' Sir, it is impossible for me to express the gratitude which I feel; I can only assure the house that I shall always be ready to serve his Majesty in any capacity in which my services can be deemed useful, with the same zeal for my country which has already acquired for me the approbation of this house.

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