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H.S. Congresso House.
HEARINGS

4. - APR 21

Copy 1985
COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE.
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

BEFORE THE

EIGHTY-NINTH CONGRESS

SECOND SESSION

ON

H.R. 12322

FEBRUARY 8 AND 9, 1966

Serial X

Printed for the use of the Committee on Agriculture

ch

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1966

60-855

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HAROLD D. COOLEY, North Carolina, Chairman

W. R. POAGE, Texas, Vice Chairman E. C. GATHINGS, Arkansas

PAUL B. DAGUE, Pennsylvania JOHN L. MCMILLAN, South Carolina PAGE BELCHER, Oklahoma THOMAS G. ABERNETHY, Mississippi CHARLES M. TEAGUE, California WATKINS M. ABBITT, Virginia

ALBERT H. QUIE, Minnesota PAUL C. JONES, Missouri

MRS. CATHERINE MAY, Washington HARLAN HAGEN, California

RALPH HARVEY, Indiana FRANK A. STUBBLEFIELD, Kentucky PAUL FINDLEY, Illinois GRAHAM PURCELL, Texas

ROBERT DOLE, Kansas JAMES H. MORRISON, Louisiana

LAURENCE J. BURTON, Utah ALEC G. OLSON, Minnesota

PRENTISS WALKER, Mississippi
SPARK M. MATSUNAGA, Hawaii

GEORGE V. HANSEN, Idaho
MASTON O'NEAL, Georgia
THOMAS S. FOLEY, Washington

RESIDENT COMMISSIONER
JOSEPH Y. RESNICK, New York

SANTIAGO POLANCO-ABREU, Puerto Rico LYNN E. STALBAUM, Wisconsin ELIGIO DE LA GARZA, Texas JOSEPH P. VIGORITO, Pennsylvania JOHN C. MACKIE, Michigan ROLLAND REDLIN, North Dakota BERT BANDSTRA, Iowa STANLEY L. GREIGG, Iowa CLAIR A, CALLAN, Nebraska

Mrs. CHRISTINE S. GALLAGHER, Clerk

HYDE H. MURRAY, Assistant Clerk
JOHN J. HEIMBURGER, General Counsel

FRANCIS M. LEMAY, Staf Consultant
II

CONGRESSIONAL
HEARINGS, PRINTS AND REPORTS

RVS & Je 66

CONTENTS

H.R. 12322, a bill to enable cottongrowers to establish, finance, and carry

out a coordinated program of research and promotion to improve the com Page

petitive position of, and to expand markets for, cotton.-

2

Statement of

Anderson, Don, member, Cotton Producers Institute Steering Commit-

tee for High Plains area of Texas.--

58

Bernard, Miss Nancy, “1966 Maid of Cotton,” Lubbock, Tex_-

75

Buck, George S., Jr., director of research, National Cotton Council.. 46

Caldwell, Mrs. Harry B., master of the North Carolina State Grange 54

Cortright, G. C., Jr., chairman of the board, National Cotton Council

of America

31, 41

DeVancy, C. H., president, Texas Farm Bureau.

100
Evans, Hervey, Jr., chairman, Cotton Producers Institute Steering
Committee for North Carolina..

53

Funk, Jack, chairman, Cotton Producers Institute Steering Commit-

tee for Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas.

57

Giffin, Russell, Fresno, Calif..

124

Girard, Clarence H., Deputy Administrator, Regulatory Programs,

Consumer and Marketing Service, U.S. Department of Agricul-

ture

15

Graham, Harry L., legislative representative, National Grange

137

Grant, Allan, president, California Farm Bureau, as read by Walter L.

Randolph, vice president, American Farm Bureau Federation... 120

Hays, J. D., president, Alabama Farm Bureau..

113

Horne, M. K., Jr., chief economist, National Cotton Council

33

Huddleston, H. H., vice president, Mississippi Farm Bureau-

103

Johnson, Reuben L., director, legislative services, National Farmers

Union.---

129

Kennedy, J. Russell, executive committee, Cotton Producers Institute.

60

Lipscomb, Ed, director, sales promotion, National Cotton Council.. 48

Mahon, Hon. George H., a Representative in Congress from the State

of Texas..

75

Mann, Lon, member, Cotton Producers Institute Steering Committee

for Arkansas.

62

Munn, Lewis, president, Oklahoma Farm Bureau, as read by Walter L.

Randolph, vice president, American Farm Bureau Federation

121

Randolph, Walter L., vice president, American Farm Bureau Federa-

tion.

93

Salyer, Clarence, Corcoran, Calif.

123

Shuman, Charles B., president, American Farm Bureau Federation - 67, 77

York, Clyde M., president, Tennessee Farm Bureau--

99

Correspondence submitted to the committee

Gibson, Jack, president, Agricultural Council of Arkansas, letter of

February 4, 1966.

65

Johnson, Alsey B., president, Carolinas Ginners Association, letter of

February 11, 1966.

122

Lanier, William L., president, Georgia Farm Bureau Federation, letter

of February 23, 1966..

121

McAden H. Wesley, executive vice president, American Cotton Com-

press & Warehouse Association, Inc., letter of February 8, 1966 - 53

Schnittker, Hon. John A., Acting Secretary of Agriculture, letter of

February 7, 1966, a report on H.R. 12322

8

Shuman, Charles B., president, American Farm Bureau Federation,

letter of February 21, 1966.

141

Stevens, Boswell, president, Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation,
letter of February 4, 1966 .

103
Wilson, R. E. L., 3d, chairman, Cotton Producers Institute Steering

Committee for Arka: sas, letter..

III

ney

COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PROGRAM

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1966

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D.C. The committee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:10 a.m., in room 1301, Longworth House Office Building, Washington, D.C., Hon. Harold D. Cooley (chairman) presiding:

Present: Representatives Cooley, Poage, Gathings, Abernethy, Abbitt, Jones of Missouri, Hagen of California, Purcell, O'Neal, Foley, Stalbaum, de la Garza, Vigorito, Redlin, Bandstra, Greigg, Callan, Dague, Teague of California, Quie, Findley, Dole, Burton of Utah, Walker of Mississippi and Polanco-Abreu.

Also present: Martha Hannah, staff; Hyde H. Murray, assistant clerk; John J. Heimburger, counsel; and Francis LeMay, consultant.

The CHAIRMAN. The committee will please be in order.
I want to make just a brief statement before we call the first witness.

I am certain that all of you know that this committee has been intensely interested in the cotton industry for many years, and for many years prior to January 1, 1953, our programs have operated very successfully and very well. We have maintained the farm income and have stabilized farm prices. Actually, that has been true for the last several years.

Prior to January 1, 1953, the market prices had averaged 100 percent of parity or more. On January 1, 1952, the cotton program alone showed a net profit to the taxpayers of roughly $8 million. The price support programs on all of the basic commodities, through all of the years, showed a net profit of $17 million.

Since that time we have accumulated tremendous surpluses, and we have sustained gigantic losses. The losses in the commodities run to more than $2 billion at the present time, and we are still faced with the problem of dealing with surpluses which we now have on hand.

Our farmers have cooperated with the Government in every way possible. We have decreased production.

We have a cotton bill now in operation. We had one just preceding that which proved to be very expensive but which we think revitalized the textile industry of America.

The textile industry is important not only to the farmers but to all segments of the cotton economy. It is very important to my own State of North Carolina. We have more spindles in North Carolina than in any State in the Union. We have more people employed in our textile mills than in any State in the Union, and it is necessary for us to maintain the cotton industry.

1

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