Reprint of Proceedings of the M.W.Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of West Virginia: From the Organization in 1865 Until and Including the Annual Communication in 1881

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order of the Grand Lodge, Lewis Baker, printer, 1882 - 687 pages

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Page 370 - Hath seal'd thee for herself; for thou hast been As one, in suffering all, that suffers nothing ; A man, that Fortune's buffets and rewards Hast ta'en with equal thanks : and blest are those, Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled, That they are not a pipe for Fortune's finger To sound what stop she please.
Page 370 - That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger To sound what stop she please. Give me that man That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart, As I do thee.
Page 370 - Friendship is no plant of hasty growth, Though planted in esteem's deep fixed soil The gradual culture of kind intercourse Must bring it to perfection.
Page 129 - And the house, when it was in building, was built of stone made ready before it was brought thither : so that there was neither hammer nor axe nor any tool of iron heard in the house, while it was in building.
Page 125 - That the free communication of thoughts and opinions is one of the invaluable rights of man, and that every person may freely speak, write, and print, on any subject, being responsible for the abuse of that liberty.
Page 368 - The hills Rock-ribbed and ancient as the sun,— the vales Stretching in pensive quietness between; The venerable woods— rivers that move In majesty, and the complaining brooks That make the meadows green; and, poured round all, Old ocean's gray and melancholy waste,— Are but the solemn decorations all Of the great tomb of man.
Page 553 - By the exercise of brotherly love, we are taught to regard the whole human species as one family, the high and low, the rich and poor, who, as created by one Almighty Parent, and inhabitants of the same planet, are to aid, support, and protect each other. On this principle, Masonry unites men of every country, sect and opinion, and conciliates true friendship among those who might otherwise have remained at a perpetual distance.
Page 158 - Master, whom I know to be of good morals and great skill, true and trusty, and a lover of the whole fraternity, wheresoever dispersed over the face of the earth.
Page 137 - You admit that it is not in the power of any man or body of men to make innovations in the body of Masonry.
Page 124 - ... everything in this article is excepted out of the general powers of the government, and shall forever remain inviolate; and that all laws contrary thereto, or to the other provisions herein contained shall be void.

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