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CHAPTER 453.- Payment of wages- Allegany County.

SECTION 1. Sections one hundred and eighty-five and one hundred and eighty-six (of article one) of the Code of Public Local Laws, title "Allegany County,' subtitle ** Manufacturers and Miners,” are hereby repealed and reenacted with amendments, so as to read as follows:

185. Every corporation engaged in mining or' manufacturing or operating a railroad in Illegany County, and employing ten or more hands, shall pay its employees the full amount of their wages in legal tender money of the United States, and any contract by or on behalf of any such corporation for the payment of the whole or of any part of said wages, in any other manner than provided shall be and is hereby declared illegal, null and void; and every such employee shall be entitled to recover from any such corporation employing him, the whole or so much of the wages earned by him as shall not have been actually paid to him in legal tender money of the United States without set-off or deduction of his demand for or in respect of any account or claim whatever, but no such corporation employing hands as aforesaid shall issue any scrip or metallic or paper checks in payment of the sums due such employees, nor shall such employees make any contract with its (their) employers by which such employees shall be compelled to purchase their supplies, merchandise or goods from any private or company stores owned and operated by the said employers; nor shall said employers by means of such employment exercise any influence whatever on said hands by promises or threats to compel their employees to deal with any particular merchant or storekeeper.

186. Nothing in the preceding section shall be construed to prevent any such corporation from demising to any of its employees the whole or any part of any tenement in said county at any rent thereon reservell, or from contracting for or advancing money to supply him with medicine or medical attendance needed for himself or family, or smithing or fuel, and deducting from the wages of any such employee for and in respect of such rent, medicine, medical attendance, smithing or fuel, or money advanced as aforesaid, or deduction of dues for Miner's Mutual Aid Society; but no such corporation shall have the right to deduct any moneys from the wages of its employees in payment for merchandise of any other character than those hereinbefore in this section mentioned and specified, subject to all the penalties prescribed by section one hundred and eighty-eight. SEC. 2. This act shall take effect from the date of its passage. Approved April 7, 1900.

CHAPTER 589.-Seats for female employees-Baltimore. SECTION 1. Section five hundred and five, chapter one hundred and twenty-three, acts of General Assembly passed January session, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, is hereby repealed and reenacted to read as follows:

SEC. 505. Every employer of females and mercantile or manufacturing establishment in the city of Baltimore must provide and maintain suitable seats for the use of such employees. A person is deemed not to maintain suitable seats for the use of female employees unless he permits the use thereof by such employees to such extent as may be reasonable for the preservation of health and proper rest, and the question of what is thus reasonable is one for determination by the jury or the court acting as a jury in any prosecution hereunder.

SEC. 2. This act shall take effect from the date of its passage.
Approved April 10, 1900.

MISSISSIPPI.

ACTS OF 1900.

CHAPTER 18.Industrial education, Establishment of a textile school. SECTION 1. A textile school [shall] be established in connection with the Agricultural and Mechanical College, where young men and women may be educated in the art of manufacturing textile fabrics and where they may acquire a practical as well as theoretical and scientific knowledge of the art of manufacturing textile fabries, and especially those made from cotton, or cotton and wool combined, including dyeing, designing and drawing.

SEC. 2. It shall be the duty of the board of trustees to cause to be erected the necessary building for the motive power and machinery of the factory building, for the accommodation of not more than one hundred pupils, and a dormitory building to accommodate a like number and to supply the factory building with the necessary motive power of steam or electricity, in their discretion, and all other necessary machinery and appliances for manufacturing cotton and such other fabrics as may be agreed upon by the faculty and approved by the trustees and also for dyeing, having in view the purpose of this act, as defined in the first section thereof, and especially that relating to the manufacture of cotton fabrics.

SEC. 3. It shall be the duty of the board of trustees when said buildings have been erected, and equipped as provided for in this act, to elect a competent and efficient director of the textile school, who shall become thereby a member of the faculty of the said A. & M. College, and shall receive such salary as may be fixed by the board of trustees. They shall likewise employ or authorize the employment of such assistants in the various departments thereof as may be necessary to the thorough and efficient training and instruction of the students. The course of study shall be prescribed by the faculty with the approval of the board of trustees, and shall embrace carding, spinning, weaving, dyeing, harmony of colors, designing, drawing, fabric analysis and calculations, and such other branches as may be prescribed. There shall be a special course on the manufacture of cotton fabrics alone.

SEC. 4. No pupil shall be admitted to the textile school who is under fifteen years of age; and each pupil applying for admission shall be examined under rules to be prescribed by the faculty as to character, intelligence and learning, and they shall be governed by the rules and regulations prescribed for the government of said college, the trustees of which shall also fix and regulate the fees, cost and term of course of said textile department.

SEC. 5. The raw material to be manufactured in the course of study, shall be purchased by the president of the faculty, or under his direction, provided, that raised on the college farm shall be insufficient in quantity or quality. The fabrics manufactured by the school shall be sold by the president of the faculty, and the proceeds thereof and also all tuition fees shall be paid into the college treasury to the credit of the textile school, and full reports made thereof annually to the board of trustees.

SEC. 6. The board of trustees shall have authority to grant diplomas and certificates of proficiency upon the recommendation of the director of the textile school, and a majority of the faculty.

Sec. 7. The sum of forty thousand dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated out of any moneys in the treasury not otherwise appropriateil, to enable the board of trustees to carry out the provisions of this act. The said sum herein appropriated may be drawn from the State treasury upon the warrant of the auditor of public accounts, issued upon the written request of the president of the college, approved by the governor.

SEC. 8. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage.

Approved March 3, 1900. CHAPTER 101.-Laborer, etc., making a second contract without giving notice of the first.

SECTION 1. Any laborer, renter or share cropper who has contracted with another person for a specified time in writing, not exceeding one year, who shall leave his employer or the leased premises before the expiration of his contract without the consent of the employer or landlord, and makes a second contract without giving notice of the first to said second party, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction shall be fined not exceeding fifty dollars.

Sec. 2. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage.
Approved March 12, 1900.

CHAPTER 102.-Enticing laborers, etc., to leare employers. SECTION 1. Section one thousand and sixty-eight of the code of eighteen hundred and ninety-two [shall] be amended as follows: If any person shall williully interfere with, entice away, knowingly employ, or induce a laborer or renter who has contracted with another person for a specified time to leave his employer or the leased premises, before the expiration of his contract without the consent of the employer or landlord, he shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than $25 nor more than $100, and in addition shall be liable to the employer or landlord for all advances made by him to said renter or laborer by virtue of his contract with said renter or laborer, and for all damages which he may have sustained by reason thereof.

SEC. 2. This act [shall] take effect and be in force from and after its passage.
Approved March 12, 1900.

CHAPTER 119.-Convict labor.

SECTION 8. The board of supervisors (of any county) may require the contractor of any road to take and work the convicts sentenced to the county jail or committei to same to pay fine and cost imposed upon them, upon such terms and conditions as the said board and contractor may agree upon.

Sec. 11. The provisions of this act shall not apply to any county in the State, except by an order of the board of supervisors to that effect, same to be duly entered on the minutes of said board.

SEC. 13. This act shall not apply to any county that is already working its roads under special contract unless the board of supervisors of said county elects to come under the provisions of this act. Sec. 14. "This act [shall] take effect and be in force from and after its passage. Approved March 12, 1900.

UNITED STATES.

ACTS OF 1900–01.

1

Common carriers to report accidents to the Interstate Commerce Commission. SECTION 1. It shall be the.duty of the general manager, superintendent, or other proper officer of every common carrier engaged in interstate commerce by railroad to make to the Interstate Commerce Commission, at its office in Washington, District of Columbia, a monthly report, under oath, of all collisions of trains or where any train or part of a train accidentally leaves the track, and of all accidents which may occur to its passengers or employees while in the service of such common carrier and actually on duty, which report shall state the nature and causes thereof, and the circumstances connected therewith.

Sec. 2. Any common carrier failing to make such report within thirty days after the end of any month shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof by a court of competent jurisdiction, shall be punished by a fine of not more than one hundred dollars for each and every offense and for every day during which it shall fail to make such report after the time herein specified for making the same.

Sec. 3. Neither said report nor any part thereof shall be admitted as evidence or used for any purpose against such railroad so making such report in any suit or action for damages growing out of any matter mentioned in said report.

SEC. 4. The Interstate Commerce Commission is authorized to prescribe for such common carriers a method and form for making the reports in the foregoing section provided.

Approved March 3, 1901.

LEADING ARTICLES IN PAST NUMBERS OF THE BULLETIN.

No. 1. Private and public debt in the United States, by George K. Holmes.

Employer and employee under the common law, by V.H. Olmsted and S. D.

Fessenden.
No. 2. The poor colonies of Holland, by J. Howard Gore, Ph. D.

The industrial revolution in Japan, by William Eleroy Curtis.
Notes concerning the money of the U.S. and other countries, by W.C. Hunt.

The wealth and receipts and expenses of the U.S., by W. M. Steuart.
No. 3. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin, by W.F. Willoughby.
No. 4. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy, by W. F. Willoughby.

The sweating system, by Henry White. No. 5. Convict labor.

Industrial communities: Krupp Iron and Steel Works, by W. F. W'illoughby. No. 6. Industrial communities: Familistère Society of Guise, by W.F. Willoughby.

Cooperative distribution, by Edward W. Bemis, Ph. D.
No. 7. Industrial communities: Various communities, by W. F. Willoughby.

Rates of wages paid under public and private contract, by Ethelbert Stewart. No. 8. Conciliation and arbitration in the boot and shoe industry, by T. A. Carroll.

Railway relief departments, by Emory R. Johnson, Ph. D. No. 9. The padrone system and padrone banks, by John Koren.

The Dutch Society for General Welfare, by J. Howard Gore, Ph. D. No. 10. Condition of the Negro in various cities.

Building and loan associations. No. 11. Workersatgainful occupations at censuses of 1870,1880,and 1890, by W.C. Hunt. Public baths in Europe, by Edward Mussey Hartwell, Ph. D.,

M. D. No. 12. The inspection of factories and workshops in the U.S., by W. F. Willoughby.

Mutual rights and duties of parents and children, guardianship, etc., under

the law, by F.J. Stimson.

The municipal or cooperative restaurant of Grenoble, France, by C. O. Ward. No. 13. The anthracite mine faborers, by G. O. Virtue, Ph. D. No. 14. The Negroes of Farmville, Va.: A social study, by W. E. B. Du Bois, Ph. D.

Incomes, wages, and rents in Montreal, by Herbert Brown Ames, B. A. No. 15. Boarding homes and clubs for working women, by Mary S. Fergusson.

The trade-union label, by John Graham Brooks. No. 16. Alaskan gold fields and opportunities for capital and labor, by S. C. Dunham. No. 17. Brotherhood relief and insuranceof railway employees, by E. R.Johnson, Ph.D.

The nations of Antwerp, by J. Howard Gore, Ph. D. No. 18. Wages in the United States and Europe, 1870 to 1898. No. 19. Alaskan gold fields and opportunities for capital and labor, by S. C. Dunham.

Mutual relief and benefit associations in the printing trade, by W. S. Waudby. No. 20. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter E. Weyl, Ph. D. No. 21. Pawnbroking in Europe and the United States, by W. R. Patterson, Ph. D. No. 22. Benefit features of American trade unions, by Edward W. Bemis, Ph. D.

The Negro in the black belt: Some social sketches, by W. E. B. Du Bois, Ph. D.

Wages in Lyons, France, 1870 to 1896. No. 23. Attitude of women'sclubs, etc., toward social economics, by Ellen M. Henrotin.

The production of paper and pulp in the U.S. from Jan. i to June 30, 1898. No. 24, Statistics of cities. No. 25. Foreign labor laws: Great Britain and France, by W. F. Willoughby. No. 26. Protection of workmen in their employment, by Stephen D. Fessenden.

Foreign labor laws: Belgium and Switzerland, by W.F. Willoughby. No. 27. Wholesale prices: 1890 to 1899, by Roland P. Falkner, Ph. D.

Foreign labor laws: Germany, by W.F. Willoughby.
No. 28. Voluntary conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain, by J. B. McPherson.

System of adjusting wages, etc., in certain rolling mills, by J. H. Nutt.
Foreign labor laws: Austria, by W. F. Willoughby.

No. 29. Trusts and industrial combinations, by J. W. Jenks, Ph. D.

The Yukon and Nome gold regions, by S. C. Dunham.

Labor Day, by Miss M. C. de Graffenried. No. 30. Trend of wages from 1891 to 1900.

Statistics of cities.

Foreign labor laws: Various European countries, by W.F. Willoughby. No. 31. Betterment of industrial conditions, by V. H. Olmsted.

Present status of employers' liability in the U. S., by S. D. Fessenden.

Condition of railway labor in Italy, by Dr. Luigi Einaudi.
No. 32. Accidents to labor as regulated by law in the U.S., by W. F. Willoughby.

Prices of commodities and rates of wages in Manila.
The Negroes of Sandy Spring, Md.: A social study, by W. T. Thom, Ph. D.

The British Workmen's Compensation Act and its operation, by A. M. Low. No. 33. Foreign labor laws: Australasia and Canada, by W. F. Willoughby.

The British Conspiracy and Protection of Property Act and its operation, by
A. M. Low.

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