The English Cyclopaedia

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Page 255 - Lastly, I should not choose this manner of writing, wherein knowing myself inferior to myself, led by the genial power of nature to another task, I have the use, as I may account it, but of my left hand...
Page 361 - I am the LORD thy God, which brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. THOU SHALT HAVE NONE OTHER GODS BEFORE ME.
Page 237 - Charles-Quint. Son Abdication, son Séjour, et sa Mort au Monastère de Yuste.
Page 105 - Remarks on the Epistles of Cicero to Brutus, and of Brutus to Cicero, in a letter to a friend.
Page 11 - A General Dictionary of Geography, Descriptive, Physical, Statistical, and Historical ; forming a complete Gazetteer of the World. By A. KEITH JOHNSTON, FRSE 8vo. 31s. 6d. M'Culloch's Dictionary, Geographical, Statistical, and Historical, of the various Countries, Places, and principal Natural Objects in the World.
Page 347 - ... and the pump he had erected that serves water to his garden, and to passengers, with an inscription, and brings from a filthy part of the Thames near it a most perfect and pure water.
Page 11 - M'Culloch. — A Dictionary, Practical, Theoretical, and Historical, of Commerce and Commercial Navigation. Illustrated with Maps and Plans.
Page 21 - XVII Of Cruelty and Clemency, and Whether It Is Better to be Loved or Feared...
Page 399 - Some time in autumn 1781, my father bought a catechism for me, and began to teach me the alphabet. As it was too good a book for me to handle at all times, it was generally locked up, and he throughout the winter drew the figures of the letters to me in his written hand, on the board of an old wool-card, with the black end of an extinguished heather stem or root snatched from the fire. I soon learned all the alphabet in this form, and became writer as well as reader.
Page 131 - Item, I do recognise, accept, take, repute and knowledge the king's highness to be supreme head in earth, under Christ, of the church of England ; and do utterly refuse the bishop of Rome's pretended authority, power, and jurisdiction, within this realm heretofore usurped...

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