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ness of our ultimate duty and destination; and the trip down to Honolulu with a short, new complement, combined, have not been conducive to improvement in the patient's condition. He has had many attacks of nervous excitement, has been under excessive mental and nervous strain whereby his energies are exhausted. His nails are gnawed to the quick. He shakes and trembles under the slightest strain; he has mental irritability and constantly suffers from depression if anything goes wrong under his command. He does not sleep well at night. No organic disease exists to account for his present condition. Res away from his duties out of a tropical climate would restore him to normal.

Present condition: Unfit for duty.
Probable future duration: Temporary.

Recommendation: That patient be transferred to Mare Island Naval Hospital for treatment and further disposition; that patient be relieved from all duty and remain under the care of the medical officer of the U. S. S. Chicago until date of transfer.

T. WILSON,
Lieutenant Commander (M. C.), United States Navy.

H. B. LEHMBERG,
Lieutenant (M. C.), United States Navy.

F. N. PUGSLEY, Lieutenant (M. C.), United States Navy.

New YORK, N. Y. To whom it may concern:

The examination made of me by Dr. E. D. Bondurant on March 30, 1922, was ordered by the United States Veterans' Bureau in order to fix the percentage of my disability.

Dr. Bondurant, as shown by the letter addressed to Admiral Washington, by the Lamar Y. McLeod Post of the American Legion, is a nerve specialist, who is known nationally and internationally. Dr. Bondurant was on duty at the Walter Reed Hospital during the World War, where he treated "shell-shock' patients. Dr. Bondurant's record will be found on file in the War Department.

F. LEO SHEA.

REPORT OF NEUROPSYCHIATRIC EXAMINATION

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

BUREAU OF WAR RISK INSURANCE. 1. Claimant's name: Francis L. Shea. S. M. W. D. Service, rank, and organization: Lieutenant commander, United States Navy. Present address: Mobile, Ala. Legal residence: Same as above. Age, 34; color, white; pre-war occupation, officer, United States Navy.

Date of induction: Went to Naval Academy May 13, 1905; date of discharge, April 5, 1920.

Brief military history of claimant's disability during service: After a period of strenuous war service on destroyers in North Sea, etc., began suffering from nervousness, inability to sleep, irritability, restlessness, etc. Condition finally grew so serious that he was ordered to hospital for treatment, spending four months in hospitals in Honolulu and Mare Island then before a board.

Family history: Father died at 75, mother living 70, healthy. Four brothers and sisters, healthy. No nervous disease in family.

Personal history (preschool, puberty, and adolescent): Normal in early life. Went to United States Naval Academy in 1905, graduated in 1909. Served continuously to time of resignation without sickness prior to nervous breakdown in 1919. Habits good. Venereal disease denied. Married in 1920. No children (two step-children).

12. Chief present complaint: Nervousness; inability to work.

13. Present illness (date of onset development of disorder, subjective symptoms): Began with neurasthenic break-down in 1919, following strenuous war service and continuing to present time. Is "shaky”, tremuolus, irritable, bites finger nails, is emotional, unstable, despondent, anxious, lacking in self-control and in self-confidence. Unable to carry responsibility or do any real work. At times confused.

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14. Physical examination: See report. A blood Wassermann should be obtained and a general physical examination made by an internist.

15. Neurological examination: No paralysis, no incoordination, no muscular atrophy, no defect in gait, speech, nor station. Some fine tremor in hands and palms of hand wet with perspiration and hands congested. Finger nails bitten to quick. No objective sensory disorders. All tendon jerks lively. Knee jerks especially so. Imperfect or false foot clonus, both ankles. The existing condition and the history justify the diagnosis of a severe type of neurasthenia with emotional instability of shell-shock” type.

16. Mental examination: Is emotional, easily excited, and quickly loses his self-control under stress. Is also anxious and low spirited. No delusions. No evidence of impairment of reason or judgment. No defect in intelligence. No definite psychosis.

(A) Medical survey found him suffering from “neurasthenia” and recommended rest, treatment, etc. About this time the officer in a fit of impatience sent in his resignation, which was accepted. Was fairly well for a few months after he left the Navy, but as soon as he attempted to work he grew nervous again, and since then he has been nervous and irritable, excitahle, shaky, tremulous, and lacking in self-control most of the time. When he rests and does nothing, he is in fairly good condition. Whenever he works or attempts to carry responsibility he breaks down grows nervous and tremulous. In general, he is growing worse rather than better.

17. Diagnosis: Neurasthenia, severe, due to stress of war service. 18. Prognosis: Doubtful. 19. Treatment recommended. 20. Is claimant bedridden? No. 21. Able to travel? Yes. Do you advise hospital care *? Will claimant accept hospital care

* *? No. Has claimant vocational handicap? Yes.

23. Is the patient suffering from a disorder requiring constant supervision and totally unable to make a social adjustment? No.

the patient suffering from a disorder requiring supervision and with it is able to adapt himself to social usages? No.

Is the patient suffering from a disorder requiring a minimum of supervision and with it is able to adapt himself to social usages? No.

Is the patient suffering from residuum of a previous disorder and able tu adapt himself to social usages with supervision? Yes.

Vocational training.
Is training feasible? No.
Course desired: Not desired.

Remarks: This patient is suffering from emotional instability of neurastherie type which constitutes a serious disability almost total in present condition. There is no insanity nor acute mental disorder present, no disorder of orientation, memory, reason, etc., but there is such a degree of emotional unbalance as to practically render the man irresponsible in some of his reaction at times and is entirely incapable of doing work of the kind to which he has been trained. His resignation from the Navy is a good example of irresponsible action. The officer at the time was acutely nervous and ill (see board report), he needed treatment, rest, and time, and with these might have been restored to health and usefulness and full capacity for continuing in the naval service. The result of this action has been to make it necessary for him to work when he is unfit for work and the present condition is a direct result thereof. The officer now needs treatment in hospital and rest, but he is unable, he states, to take this because he must work for a living to support his family. It is the professional opinion of the writer that this officer, should, being irresponsible, not have been permitted to resign from the service, but should have been given needed treatment and allowed the opportunity for rehabilitation and recovery. Or, if this could not be brought about the officer might then have been properly retired under medical certificate of disability. It would appear that this patient has a just claim upon the Gorernment, growing out of some years of honorable service, some of it under circumstances of unusual stress. If it be possible to have the case reopened and the officer returned to his naval rank and his right to care and treatment during the disability from sickness or placed on the retired list substantial justice would thereby be done. 29. Did you examine the man yourself on this date? Yes. 30. Place: Mobile, Ala. Date: March 30, 1922.

E. D. BONDURANT.

PIERCE OIL CORPORATION,

New York, August 25, 1922. To whom it may concern:

This is to certify that Lt. Comdr. F. L. Shea joined the tank steamer department of the United States Shipping Board early in July 1920, and worked under my supervision until May 1921. During that time I was manager of the tank steamer department of the Shipping Board.

It was understood at the time of Mr. Shea's joining my department that he had been discharged from the Navy in a very nervous condition, and I therefore deemed it advisable to assign the lightest duties possible to him. I noticed at various times that his was a very nervous condition, and on one occasion I suggested the possibility of his representing the Shipping Board as marine superintendent at Port of Tampico, Mexico (which position would have meant a considerable increase in remuneration), but he explained that due to his condition he did not feel that he was justified in taking the position at Tampico.

Mr. Shea has asked me to say a word as regards his general condition during the time that he worked in the tank steamer department. From my own personal observation and knowledge, I know that Mr. Shea's condition was not at all satisfactory, and many times he suffered from a highly nervous state which impaired his general efficiency. Very truly yours,

H. D. CARTER,

Manager Marine and Jobbing Department. (SEAL)

MARY G. WHITE,

Notary Public, Queens County, No. 585. Certificate filed New York County Clerk's No. 262. Commission expires March 30, 1924.

DIVISION OF OPERATIONS, UNITED STATES SHIPPING BOARD EMERGENCY FLEET CORPORATION,

Mobile, Ala., March 30, 1922. To whom it may concern:

This is to certify that I have known Capt. F. Leo Shea since about August 1921, and he has been employed in our laid-up fieet since that date.

I have noticed Captain Shea to be extremely nervous at all times, and especially under any extraordinary circumstances, and I believe that his nervous condition lessens his ability to carry on his work to the best of his ability and capacity. Captain Shea's physical condition has refrained us, to a large extent, in placing him in a more responsible position than shipkeeper.

I am sure, however, that his present condition is not due to excessive use of alcohol or drugs, as I have never known him to be under the influence of either.

ELMO L. Davison, District Agent. Certified to be a true copy.

F. LEO Shea.

SEPTEMBER 30, 1924. To whom it may concern:

During the time that Lt. Comdr. F. L. Shea was employed on the staff of the tank steamer department, United States Shipping Board, the undersigned was assistant manager in that department. My work brought me in daily contact with Mr. Shea and I was able to observe his condition at that time. It was not until some time after Mr. Shea came with us that I learned of his naval record or of his discharge from the Navy, but it was clearly evident to me that the man was in a decidedly run-down condition and that he seemed to be suffering from a serious nervous ailment. The character of his work was arranged so as to aggravate the nervous strain he seemed to be under.

Mr. Shea was judged to be a highly capable and ambitious man and his technical ability fitted him for more ponderous and remunerative work, but it was generally known that the handicap of his condition at that time reacted seriously against him. Respectfully yours,

W. A. MORRISSEY, Manager Tank Steamer Depariment, Fleet Corporalon.

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The following is a report of the medical survey in the case of Mr. Shea on board the Chicago, dated January 27, 1920: From: Board of Medical Survey. To: Commandant Fourteenth Naval District, for transmission to the Bureau

of Medicine and Surgery. Subject: Report of Medical Survey.

Place: U.S. S. Chicago. Date, January 27, 1920.

Name: Shea, Francis Leo. Grade or rate, lieutenant commander United States Navy.

Attached to U. S. S. Chicago. How long at this place? Six months.
Born: Place, Washington, D. C. Date, January 6, 1888.
Previous service, 15 years.

PRESENT HISTORY OF CASE

Diagnosis: Neurasthenia (556).
Origin in the line of duty. Disability not the result of his own misconduct.

Facts are as follows: This officer arrived aboard the Chicago from the U. S. S. Zeppelin in a state of nervous exhaustion after a protracted period of war-zone work aboard destroyers in the North Sea. His work aboard ship has not allowed recuperation. The ever-changing crew with new details, the rough trip from New York to San Francisco, our active work in the revolution at Honduras and in the yellow fever epidemic aboard ship at Amapala, Honduras, the indefiniteness of our ultimate duty and destination, and the trip down to Honolulu with a short, new complement combined have not been conducive to improvement in the patient's condition. He has had many attacks of nervous excitement, has been under excessive mental and nervous strain, whereby his energies are exhausted. His nails are gnawed to the quick. He shakes and trembles under the slightest strain. He has mental irritability and constantly suffers from depression if anything goes wrong under his command. He does not sleep well at night. No organic disease exists to account for his present condition. Rest away from his duties out of a tropical climate would restore him to normal.

Present condition: Unfit for duty.
Probable future duration: Temporary.

Recommendation: That patient be transferred to Mare Island Naval Hospital for treatment and further disposition; that patient be relieved from all duty and remain under the care of the medical officer of the U. S. S. Chicago until date of transfer.

TALMADGE WILSON, Lieutenant Commander (M. C.), United States Nary.

H. B. LEHINBERG, Lieutenant (M. C.), United States Nary.

FREDERIC N. PUGSLEY, Lieutenant (M. C.), United States Navy.

(First endorsement)

JANUARY 28, 1920. From: Commander E. Friedrick, United States Navy, commanding U. S. &.

Chicago.
To: Commandant Fourteenth Naval District, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

1. Forwarded, recommending that in view of the conditions set forth above, patient be transferred to Pearl Harbor Hospital while awaiting transportation to States.

E. FRIEDRICK, United States Navy,

Commanding U. S. S. “Chicago."

(Second endorsement)

JANUARY 28, 1920.

From: Commandant Fourteenth Naval District.
To: Bureau of Medicine and Surgery.

1. Forwarded, approved, to go to hospital.

W. B. FLETCHER.

The following affidavits are hereby made a part of this report: STATE OF NEW YORK,

County of New York, 88:
The undersigned, W. G. Mitchell, being duly sworn, deposes and says:

That as president of the United States Protection & Indemnity Agency (Inc.) from February 16, 1925, to December 31, 1927, which organization is a corporation of which all the outstanding capital stock is owned by the United States Shipping Board, he was personally acquainted with the work of F. Leo Shea, who was employed by the said agency as a special examiner from November 6, 1925, to June 30, 1927. During the time of his employment with the agency Mr. Shea impressed the affiant as being in a highly nervous state. He would frequently become alarmed over an average occurrence and would be able to control himself only by great effort. Mr. Shea's nervous condition was evidenced by a general excited state, trembling hands, and inability to control his mental faculties for the time being.

The affiant further deposes and says that he found Mr. Shea to be a welltrained man and one in possession of technical knowledge which was valuable to the agency, but due to Mr. Shea's nervous condition, it was found inadvisable to assign to him cases which required strenuous work, particularly work telling on the nerves.

Affiant further deposes and says that he believes that, due to Mr. Shea's nervous condition, he is unsuited for certain types of work, which condition will no doubt handicap him in view of his education and training.

W. G. MITCHELL. Sworn and subscribed to before me this 2d day of May 1928.

HELEN M. PERCY. Notary Public. Commission expires March 30, 1929.

STATE OF NEW YORK,

County of New York, 88:
The undersigned, Carl P. Kremer, being duly sworn, deposes and says:

That he has been assistant to the president and secretary and treasurer of the United States Protective & Indemnity Agency (Inc.), since March 15, 1925, and in the performance of his duties he had direct contact with Mr. F. Leo Shea, who was employed by the United States Protective & Indemnity Agency (Inc.), as special examiner, from November 6, 1925, to June 30, 1927.

The affiant further depòses and says that the said Mr. F. Leo Shea, as special examiner, was engaged in work directly under the supervision of the said affiant. The work of the agency consists of the investigation and adjustment of_cargo claims, dock damage claims, and personal injury claims. The said Mr. F. Leo Shea, as previously stated, was engaged in the work of special examiner, which consisted of the investigation of personal injury claims and dock damages. During the course of his employment, the affiant observed that Mr. Shea was frequently in a highly nervous state and was thereby unable to perform some of the assignments which were made him. The work consists of the investigation of serious accidents and death cases, and it was found that this work greatly unnerved Mr. Shea.

The work of investigating these claims has to be performed promptly and thoroughly, and it was found that these arduous tasks were further undermining Mr. Shea's health. It was found that after several assignments which are ordinarily carried on by our investigators, Mr. Shea became ill and required sick leave in order to recuperate. The affiant took particular note of Mr. Shea's nervous disposition, and on frequent occasions warned him against overexertion.

The affiant had been advised by Capt. W. G. Mitchell, the then president of the United States Protective & Indemnity Agency (Inc.), who had been an officer in the United States Navy, of Mr. Shea's war experience. After noticing Mr. Shea's condition, the affiant advised Captain Mitchell that it was felt that in Mr. Shea's nervous condition he should not be subjected to the type of work required by the agency. The affiant noticed on many occasions that Mr. Shea's hand would tremble, and in other respects was completely unnerved, which condition was not caused by any unusual task, but which required the control of one's nerves. The affiant considered Mr. Shea an extremely valuable man due

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