Page images
PDF
EPUB

baggage and munitions had been left. While falling back he had three fingers of his right hand cut off by a bullet.

The Chickasaws, encouraged by the flight of the Illinois and Miamis, pursued this small force under D'Artaguette with great fury and surrounded it. D'Artaguette received a second bullet wound, this time in his thigh, which obliged him to lean against a tree, and there he bravely strove by his words to animate his troops. Many of those who were near him advised him to save himself. His servant led his horse to him and, with some of the militia, tried to induce him to mount, but he insisted on staying where he could encourage his handful of men to stand firm. While he was exhorting them he received a third gunshot wound in the abdomen and his apparently lifeless body fell to the ground.

After the disaster to their leader, M. de St. Ange and other officers exerted all their efforts to repulse the Chickasaws, but finally succumbed to the force of numbers, and most of them were killed near where D'Artaguette lay. The greater part of the militia officers perished here also. The small number of soldiers who remained, seeing themselves without officers, saved themselves by flight. The Chickasaws pursued them for nearly 4 leagues, but rain, which had fallen in great quantity since 10 o'clock, prevented them being overtaken.

This fight lasted from between 6 and 7 in the morning until 9 a.m. The Iroquois and the Arkansas behaved in a praiseworthy manner and, owing to their valor during the retreat, more than 20 wounded, who would otherwise have been killed or made prisoners, were carried in safety to Ecors a Prud'homme, where the remnant of the army arrived, part on the 29th of March and the rest the following day.

One of the militia officers captured by the Chickasaws was Drouet de Richardville, who lost three brothers in the fight, and himself suffered three wounds before he was taken. Richardville was one of two French prisoners kept alive by the Chickasaws for the purpose of exchanging them for one of their warriors whom the French bad taken prisoner some time before. After 18 months' detention among the Indians, Richardville and the other Frenchman escaped, and after many bardships the former finally reached Montreal on the 10th of June 1739. It was from his reports that the many rumors as to what had occurred to the French prisoners were cleared up. Of the 22 French who were captured, all but Richardville and one other were burned to death. From 3 in the afternoon until midnight of the day of the fight D'Artaguette, Father Senat, Vincennes, St. Ange, and others, to the number of 20, were thrown alive into the two fires which the Indian women had prepared. An Indian girl, who had been a slave among the Chickasaws and who later was rescued from them by the Alibamons, was brought to Bienville where she related the story of this barbarity. She said that during the preparation for this tragedy the French sang in the same manner as do the Indians, "who judge the valor of a warrior only by the strength or weakness of his voice at the time when they are about to put him to death.” The Sieur de Courselas, who had been left to guard the ammunition and baggage, wandered into a Chickasaw village without knowing where he was going and, being taken prisoner, was burned to death 3 days later.

Sieur de Richardville reported that from Ecors a Prud'homme to the 9 Chickasaw villages was about 60 leagues, much of the path leading over low ground overgrown with ash. These 9 villages were located on a plain cut by several small ridges, and at a distance of 2, 3, and 4 arpents on from the other. The grand village was a half league from these, beyond a village of the Natchez. There was a total of about 600 warriors in all the villages. Each of the 9 villages had a fort around which cabins were constructed. The forts were square and without bastions, 50 or 60 feet on a side. The enclosure was made of posts extending 7 or 8 feet above the ground, and braced at the back by forked stakes. These posts were set 24 feet in the ground in double rows, and were pierced with loopholes. The cabins were built of oak posts with but one small opening, set up in circular form. The roof was made of mud shaped into a dome, and was covered over with straw. There were no streams in any of the villages but springs which were made into wells supplied them with water. Forage was to be found everywhere, horses were plentiful, and all the warriors had guns, powder, and bullets which English traders furnished in exchange for furs.

O

INCLUDE WITHIN THE DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST, IN THE STATE OF OREGON, CERTAIN PUBLIC LANDS WITHIN THE EXCHANGE BOUNDARIES HEREOF

APRIL 4, 1935.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. Mott, from the Committee on the Public Lands, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 4459)

The Committee on the Public Lands, to whom was referred a bill (H. R. 4459) to include within the Deschutes National Forest, in the State of Oregon, certain lands within the exchange boundaries thereof, after careful consideration of same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass the House without amendment.

A somewhat similar bill, S. 2924, passed the Senate during the Seventy-third Congress, was referred to this committee and reported favorably with amendments on May 28, 1934, to the House.

Facts concerning the proposed legislation are set forth in the favorable report of the Secretary of Agriculture under date of February 5, 1935, and also in the report of the Secretary of the Interior under date of February 21, 1935, which reports are hereinbelow set out in full and made a part of this report.

[ocr errors]

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

February 5, 1935. Hon. RENÉ L. DE ROUEN,

Chairman Committee on the Public Lands, House of Representatives. DEAR MR. DE ROUEN: Reference is made to your letter of January 25 enclosing copy of H. R. 4459, a bill to include within the Deschutes National Forest, in the State of Oregon, certain public lands within the exchange boundaries thereof, and asking for a report thereon.

This bill is identical with S. 2924 of the last Congress on which the Department made a favorable report on March 14, 1934, and which bill passed the Senate on March 29, 1934, and was favorably reported from your committee on May 28, 1934,

By act of Congress of February 2, 1922 (42 Stat. 362), the Secretary of the Interior was authorized, on the recommendation of the Secretary of Agriculture, to acoept title to privately owned lands lying within 6 miles of the boundaries of

H. Repts., 74-1, vol. 2—6

the Deschutes National Forest in the State of Oregon, and to give in exchange therefor an equal value of national-forest land or timber, the values to be determined by the Secretary of Agriculture.

The proposed legislation would add a section to the above-mentioned act whereby the President by proclamation could add to the Deschutes National Forest any publicly owned land lying within 6 miles of the boundaries of that national forest. As originally established, the boundaries of the Deschutes National Forest largely were designed to exclude areas predominantly in private ownership, hence do not coincide with the natural limits of tree growth or forest management. Much of the timberland outside of the forest boundaries is integrally related to the part inside, and as the utilization of the mature timber on the private lands progressed the desirability of the future protection and management of such lands as parts of the national forest became more evident. To that end, Congress passed the act of February 2, 1922, under which a number of exchanges have been consummated, improving and facilitating the management of the Deschutes National Forest. Future similar exchanges are contemplated

If it is to the public interest to reacquire and permanently reserve the privately owned lands chiefly valuable for timber production and within 6 miles of the boundaries of the Deschutes National Forest, by granting in exchange therefor equal values of national forest land and/or stumpage, it would appear to be equally to the public interest to permanently reserve the public lands within the same 6-mile zone, which can be made available for national-forest purposes without any grant of public funds or resources. In the opinion of this Department, the principles and provisions of the bill, H. R. 4459, are logical and sound and will contribute to the betterment and more effective management of the Deschutes National Forest; consequently the measure has my approval.

The enactment of the legislation would not add to the cost of administration of the Deschutes National Forest. Very sincerely yours,

H. A. WALLACE, Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, February 21, 1935. Hon. RENÉ L. DEROUEN,

Chairman Committee on the Public Lands, House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. DERouen: I have received your request for report on H. R. 4459, which proposes to authorize addition of certain public lands to the Deschutes National Forest in Oregon.

Under the act of February 2, 1922 (42 Stat. 362), privately owned lands within 6 miles of the boundaries of this national forest found by the Secretary of Agriculture chiefly valuable for national forest purposes may be exchanged for an equal value of national forest land or timber in the State, and upon acceptance of title become parts of the national forest. The present bill would amend that act by adding a section authorizing the President to include in the national forest such publicly owned lands within the 6-mile area as may be found by the Secretaries of Agriculture and the Interior to be chiefly valuable for national forest purposes, subject to valid existing rights.

Somewhat similar legislation was proposed in the last Congress, S. 2924, and I reported favorably thereon April 25, 1934, provided the measure were amended to require a determination by the Secretary of the Interior as well as the Secretary of Agriculture as to the public lands which should be added to the national forest.

All the public lands within the area involved are now withdrawn from settlement or entry, some 45,000 acres under Executive order of March 22, 1929, in aid of legislation to include them in the national forest. The organization of grazing districts under the Taylor Grazing Act of June 28, 1934 (48 Stat. 1269), is now in progress in Oregon, and as an aid in facilitating such action all the unreserved public lands in the State have been withdrawn by Executive order of November 26, 1934, pending classification as to the best use of the land.

As the additions to the national forest contemplated are restricted under the terms of the bill to such public lands as the Secretaries of Agriculture and the Interior may determine to be chiefly valuable for national-forest purposes, I have no objection to its enactment. Sincerely yours,

HAROLD L. ICKES,

Secretary of the Interior, o

AID IN PROVIDING THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES WITH ADEQUATE FACILITIES FOR PARK, PARKWAY, AND RECREATIONAL-AREA PURPOSES, ETC.

APRIL 4, 1935.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. ROBINSON of Utah, from the Committee on the Public Lands,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 6594)

The Committee on the Public Lands, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6594) to aid in providing the people of the United States with adequate facilities for park, parkway, and recreational-area purposes, and to provide for the transfer of certain lands chiefly valuable for such purposes to States and political subdivisions thereof, after careful consideration of same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass the House without amendment.

A similar bill (H. R. 9788) was reported out of this committee as per Report No. 1895, Seventy-third Congress, second session.

Facts concerning the proposed legislation are set forth in the favorable report of the Secretary of Interior under date of April 3, 1935, which report is hereinbelow set out in full and made a part of this report.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, April 3, 1935. Hon. RENÉ L. DEROUEN, Chairman Committee on the Public Lands,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I have received your letter of March 21, enclosing copy of H. R. 6594, entitled “A bill to aid in providing the people of the United States with adequate facilities for park, parkway, and recreational-area purposes, and to provide for the transfer of certain lands chiefly valuable for such purposes to States and political subdivisions thereof," and requesting a report thereon.

This legislation proposes to establish a cooperative and helpful relationship between the Federal Government and the park agencies in the several States comparable with relationships already existing in the field of forestry, education, etc. It is offered and urged for passage primarily because it is believed that it

« PreviousContinue »