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comprehensive national program of forest-land management, the Secretary of Agriculture is hereby authorized to enter into cooperative agreements with appropriate officials of any State or States for acquiring in the name of the United States, by purchase or otherwise, such forest lands within the cooperating State as in his judgment the State is adequately prepared to administer, develop, and manage as State forests in accordance with the provisions of this Act and with such other terms not inconsistent therewith as he shall prescribe, such acquisition to include the mapping, examination, appraisal, and surveying of such lands and the doing of all things necessary to perfect title thereto in the United States: Provided, That, since it is the declared policy of Congress to maintain and, where it is in the national interest to extend the national-forest system, nothing herein shall be construed to modify, limit, or change in any manner whatsoever the future ownership and administration by the United States of existing national forests and related facilities, or hereafter to restrict or prevent their extension through the acquisition by purchase or otherwise of additional lands for any national-forest purpose: Provided further, That this Act shall not be construed to limit or repeal any legislation authorizing land exchanges by the Federal Government, and private lands acquired by exchange within the limits of any area subject to a cooperative agreement of the character herein authorized shall hereafter be subject to the provisions of this Act.

SEC. 2. No cooperative agreement shall be entered into or continued in force under the authority of this Act or any land acquired hereunder turned over to the cooperating State for administration, development, and management unless the State concerned, as a consideration for the benefits extended to it thereunder, complies in a manner satisfactory to the Secretary of Agriculture with the following conditions and requirements which shall constitute a part of every such agreement:

(a) In order to reduce the need for public expenditures in the acquisition of lands which may be brought into public ownership through the enforcement of appropriate tax delinquency laws, and, by bringing about the handling of such lands upon a sound social and economic basis, to terminate a system of indeterminate and unsound ownership injurious to the private and public interest alike, no additional lands shall be acquired within any State by the United States under this Act after June 30, 1942, unless the State concerned has prior thereto provided by law for the reversion of title to the State or a political unit thereof of taxdelinquent lands and for blocking into State or other public forests the areas which are more suitable for public than private ownership, and which in the public interest should be devoted primarily to the production of timber crops and/or the maintenance of forests for watershed protection, and for the enforcement of such law: Provided, That in the administration of this Act prior to June 30, 1942, preference will be given to States applying for cooperation hereunder which provide by law for such reversion of title under tax delinquency laws.

(b) In order to insure a stable and efficient organization for the development and administration of the lands acquired under this Act, the State shall provide for the employment of a State forester, who shall be a professionally trained forester of recognized standing, and of a State forest organization in which the personnel is technically qualified and employed, advanced, and retained upon the basis of merit. In the administration of this Act preference will be given to those States which have provided by law for such employment on a merit basis.

(c) The Secretary of Agriculture and the appropriate authorities of each cooperating State shall work out a mutually satisfactory plan defining forest areas within the State which can be most effectively and economically administered by said State, which plan shall constitute a part of the cooperative agreement between the United States and the State concerned: Provided, That nothing herein shall be held to prevent the Secretary of Agriculture from later agreeing with the proper State authorities to desirable modifications in such plan.

(d) No payment of Federal funds shall be made for land selected for purchase by the United States under this Act until such proposed purchase has been submitted to and approved by the National Forest Reservation Commission created by section 4 of the Act approved March 1, 1911 (36 Stat. 961; U. S. C., title 16, sec. 513).

(e) Subject to the approval of the National Forest Reservation Commission, the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to pay out of any available money appropriated for carrying out the purposes of this Act any State, county, and/or town taxes, exclusive of penalties, due or accrued on any forest lands acquired by the United States under donations from the owners thereof and which lands are to be included in a State or other public forest pursuant to this Act.

(1) The State shall prepare such standards of forest administration, development, and management as are necessary to insure maximum feasible utility for timber production and watershed protection, and are acceptable to the Secretary of Agriculture and shall apply the same to lands acquired and placed under the jurisdiction of the State pursuant to this Act.

(g) That with the exception of such Federal expenditures as may be made for unemployment relief, the State shall pay without assistance from the Federal Government the entire future cost of administering, developing, and managing all forest lands acquired and over which it has been given jurisdiction under this Act.

(h) During the period any cooperative agreement made under this Act remains in force, one-half of the gross proceeds from all lands covered by said agreement and to which the United States holds title shall be paid by the State to the United States and covered into the Treasury., All such payments shall be credited to the purchase price the State is to pay the United States for said land, such purchase price to be an amount equal to the total sum expended by the United States in acquiring said lands. Upon payments of the full purchase price, either as herein provided or otherwise, title to said lands shall be transferred from the Federal Government to the State, and the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to take such action and incur such expenditures as may be necessary to effectuate such transfer.

(i) Upon the request of the State concerned, any agreement made pursuant to this Act may be terminated by the Secretary of Agriculture. The Secretary of Agriculture may on his own motion terminate any such agreement for any violation of its terms and/or the provisions of this Act. If such an agreement is terminated, the Federal-owned lands affected by it shall thereafter be held and administered as are national forest lands acquired by the United States under the Act of March 1, 1911 (36 Stat. 961), as amended; but the United States shall reimburse the State for so much of the State funds as have been expended in the administration, development, and management of the lands involved as the Secretary of Agriculture may decide to be fair and equitable.

(j) The State shall furnish the Secretary of Agriculture with such annual, periodic, or special reports as he may require respecting the State's operations under its agreement with him.

(k) When a State or political unit thereof acquires under tax delinquency laws title to forest lands without cost to the United States and which lands are included within a State or other public forest, the Secretary of Agriculture, on behalf of the Federal Government, may contribute annually out of any funds made available under this Act not to exceed one-half the cost of administering, developing, and managing said lands.

SEC. 3. For the purposes of this Act, there is hereby authorized to be appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, not to exceed $20,000,000.

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EXTENDING THE TIME DURING

DURING WHICH CERTAIN DOMESTIC ANIMALS WHICH HAVE CROSSED THE BOUNDARY LINE MAY BE RETURNED DUTY FREE

May 7, 1935.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. DOUGHTON, from the Committee on Ways and Means, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 6143]

The Committee on Ways and Means, having had under consideration H. R. 6143, extending the time during which certain domestic animals which have crossed the boundary line may be returned duty free, report the same back to the House favorably with the recommendation that it be passed with the following amendments:

In line 10, after the comma following the word "animals”, insert the words “whether or not accompanying the parent animals."

In line 11 strike out the word “heretofore" and the words “Or" and "hereafter” in line 12

These amendments are in accordance with the suggestions contained in the letters of the Secretary of the Treasury, which are attached hereto and made a part of this report.

GENERAL STATEMENT

Provision is made by the Tariff Act of 1930 for the return duty free of domestic animals which have crossed the boundary line into foreign countries within a period of 8 months from the time such animals strayed or were driven across the boundary.

The recent severe and prolonged drought throughout the Southwest has necessitated the taking to Mexico of large numbers of cattle and sheep for temporary pasturage purposes and the time specified by the act and the regulations has proven too short to give the relief sought by the owners by taking their stock to Mexico. The purpose of the bill under consideration is to permit the return duty free at any time before June 30, 1936.

Your committee is advised that there were approximately 42,000 head of cattle moved into Mexico last year from western Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, and that most of the ranges from which these cattle were moved are still in the drought and dust-ridden areas.

This extension of time in which these cattle may be returned duty free is strongly urged by the stockmen of the States affected, as well as by the receiver of the First National Bank of El Paso, on behalf of the Government which either owns or has a lien on approximately one-third of the cattle involved. This extension is also approved by the executive committee of the American Live Stock Association in order to conserve these herds and allow sufficient time for the rehabilitation of the ranges from which these cattle were moved.

The letters of the Secretary of the Treasury, above referred to, are as follows:

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Washington, May 3, 1935. Hon. ROBERT L. DOUGHTON, Chairman Committee on Ways and Means,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I refer to your request of April 26, 1935, for such comment and recommendation as I may care to make with respect to H. R. 6143, a bill to extend the time during which domestic animals which have crossed the boundary line into foreign countries may be returned duty free.

This bill is identical in language with S. 1617, which was introduced in the Senate on February 4, 1935. I enclose for your information a copy of the Department's report on March 13 on S. 1617.

If H. R. 6143 is amended in accordance with the suggestions set forth in my report on S. 1617, it is not believed that it will present any new administrative difficulties. Very truly yours,

H. MORGENTHAU, Jr.,

Secretary of the Treasury. TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Washington, March 13, 1935. Hon. Pat HARRISON,

Chairman Committee on Finance, United States Senate. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I refer to your communication of February 5, 1935, requesting a report on S. 1617, a bill to extend the time during which domestic animals which have crossed the boundary line into foreign countries may be returned duty free.

This bill, if enacted into law, would provide for the free entry of horses, mules, asses, cattle, sheep, and other domestic animals which stray or are driven across the boundary line into a foreign country for temporary pasturage purposes only prior to November 1, 1935, and the offspring and increase of such animals if brought into the United States prior to June 30, 1936.

This bill is similar to Joint Resolution 101 of the Sixty-seventh Congress, 2 and 52 of the Sixty-eighth Congress, and 29 of the Sixty-ninth Congress, and is similar in purpose to House Joint Resolution 142, introduced into the present Congress by the Hon. R. E. Thomason and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives, United States.

It is noted that the bill as drafted would also authorize the free entry of the offspring and increase of domestic animals straying across the boundary line into a foreign country or driven across such boundary line for temporary pasturage purposes only, prior to November 1, 1935. If it is intended to authorize the free entry of the offspring and increase of such animals born while abroad, whether or not they accompany the parent animals, it is believed that there should be inserted in line 10 of the bill after the comma following the word “animals”, the following clause or words of similar import, “whether or not accompanying the parent animals.

As the customs regulations now in force are not consistent with all the provisions of the proposed bill, it is suggested that the word "heretofore” in line 1 of page 2, and the words “or" and "hereafter” in line 2 of page 2 be deleted.

if the bill is amended in accordance with the foregoing suggestions, I do not believe it will present any new administrative difficulties. Very truly yours,

H. MORGENTHAU, Jr.,

Secretary of the Treasury. O

APPROPRIATIONS FOR DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND FOR FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1936

May 7, 1935.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. SANDLIN, from the committee of conference, submitted the

following

CONFERENCE REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 6718]

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The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on certain amendments of the Senate to the bill (H. R. 6718) "making appropriations for the Department of Agriculture and for the Farm Credit Administration for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1936, and for other purposes", having met, after full and free conference have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses as follows:

That the Senate recede from its amendments numbered 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 16, 17, 34, 44, 47, 55, 56, 57, and 59.

That the House recede from its disagreement to the amendments of the Senate numbered 1, 2, 9, 10, 19, 21, 24, 27, 28, 30, 31, 32, 33, 43, 45, 46, 48, 49, and 52, and agree to the same.

Amendment numbered 11: That the House recede from its disagreement to the amendment of the Senate numbered 11, and agree to the same with an amendment, as follows:

In lieu of the matter inserted by said amendment, insert: or; and the Senate agree to the same.

Amendment numbered 12:

That the House recede from its disagreement to the amendment of the Senate numbered 12, and agree to the same with an amendment, as follows:

In lieu of the sum proposed, insert: $381,755; and the Senate agree to the same.

Amendment numbered 13:

That the House recede from its disagreement to the amendment of the Senate numbered 13, and agree to the same with an amendment, as follows:

In lieu of the sum proposed, insert: $11,313,419; and the Senate agree to the same.

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