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CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

In compliance with paragraph 2a of rule XIII of the House, the changes proposed by the bill (H. R. 6374) in existing law (39 U.S. C. 406) are shown as follows (the matter proposed to be stricken out by the bill is shown in black brackets and the new matter proposed to be inserted by the bill is shown by italics; the existing law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman):

The Postmaster General may regulate the period during which undelivered letters and parcels of the first class shall remain in any post office and when they shall be returned to the dead-letter office; and he may make regulations for their return from the dead-letter office to the writers when they cannot be delivered to the parties addressed. When letters and parcels of the first class are returned from the dead-letter office to the writers, a fee of [3] 5 cents shall be collected at the time of delivery, and in addition a charge shall be made of the minimum registry fee for the return of all ordinary dead letters containing $1 or more in cash, and parcels of the first class apparently valued at $1 or more, under such rules and regulations as the Postmaster General may prescribe.

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APPROPRIATION FOR CERTAIN MUNICIPAL EXPENSES INCIDENT TO THE CONVENTION OF THE IMPERIAL COUNCIL OF THE MYSTIC SHRINE IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA IN 1935

May 6, 1935.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. BUCHANAN, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. J. Res. 272]

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The Committee on Appropriations, to whom was referred the joint resolution "To enable the Commissioners of the District of Columbia to defray certain expenses incident to the convention of the Imperial Council of the Mystic Shrine, June 8 to 17, 1935, both inclusive" (H. J. Res. 272), report the measure without amendment and with a recommendation for its early consideration and enactment.

The joint resolution appropriates $54,000 to enable the Commissioners of the District of Columbia to furnish the additional municipal services and to perform the additional duties that will be imposed in connection with the holding in Washington during the second week in June of the convention of the Imperial Council of the Mystic Shrine. Vast throngs of people from all over the Nation are expected to attend this gathering and estimates of attendance in some authentic quarters run over 300,000. The Commissioners should be in a position properly to protect, direct, and handle the crowds in the city during this period.

The appropriation of $54,000 is payable wholly from the revenues of the District of Columbia pursuant to Public Resolution No. 14 of this Congress, approved April 24, 1935, and is composed of $50,000 for maintenance of public order and the protection of life and property and $4,000 for the establishment and operation of temporary publicconvenience stations, first-aid stations, and information booths.

The recommendation for the appropriation at this time is urgent, due to the fact that supplies and equipment must be advertised and contracted for and the necessary publication of special municipal regulations for the occasion may comply with legal requirements.

The amount recommended is pursuant to a Budget estimate submitted in House Document No. 169 of the present session. The committee has conducted hearings upon this request and has received from the representatives of the municipal government the details of the estimated expenditures contemplated under the special appropriation. The amount allowed is identical with the sum appropriated for a similar convention held in the District of Columbia in 1923.

PROGRAM OF FOREST LAND MANAGEMENT

May 6, 1935.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. Doxer, from the Committee on Agriculture, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 6914)

The Committee on Agriculture, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6914) to authorize cooperation with the several States for the purpose of stimulating the acquisition, development, and proper administration and management of State forests and coordinating Federal and State activities in carrying out a national program of forest-land management, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass.

STATEMENT

H. R. 6914 has the approval of the American Forestry Association, and a great many of the State foresters appeared before the subcommittee and testified in behalf of this proposed legislation.

Mr. F. A. Silcox, Chief of the Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, also appeared before the subcommittee and made a very comprehensive statement on the bill, thoroughly approved it, and endorsed in principle the plan set forth therein.

The purpose of the bill is to extend the forestry program through a cooperative set-up of the Federal Government and the States, to stabilize the State forestry departments, and to aid and stimulate the States that have not yet been able to build up their State forestry systems.

The bill provides for the acquisition, development, and management of State forests through the coordinated efforts of the Federal and State agencies. The bill is designed to safeguard the rights of the States as well as those of the Federal Government.

Under the bill, the States may acquire forest units under a longtime payment system which will pay back to the Federal Government the amount of money it spent for the lands.

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The selection of the forest areas is made by the State forest authorities and recommended to the Federal Forest Service which will go over the matter and then submit it to the National Forest Reservation Commission for final approval, which will authorize the purchase of the State forest unit as is now done with regard to the purchase of national forest units. The States do not have to match the money in any way. The Federal Government purchases the land outright and pays all expenses incident to the purchase. Then the purchased forest area is turned over to the State forest organizations by cooperative agreements signed by the Secretary of Agriculture and the proper State officials. The land thereafter is under the direct management of the State forest service with cooperative technical assistance and supervision from the Federal Government.

The Federal Government continues to own the land until the States buy the land back out of the resources derived from the land under the management of the States. In other words, it is a resale on the installment plan. The States are given an opportunity through this long-range program of securing these lands ultimately as State forests by being aided at this time by the Federal Government purchasing the lands and turning them over to the States to administer, the future cost of administering, developing, and managing to be paid by the States.

However, section 2 (k) of the bill provides that when tax-delinquent lands are acquired by the State and the Federal Government is relieved of the land-acquisition problem, the Government may aid the State by contributing annually out of any funds made available under this act not more than one-half the cost of administering, developing, and managing such forest lands, along the same line as the Government now contributes toward forest-fire protection throughout the country:

Under this bill a number of small areas may be set up so that participation in the forestry program will be distributed over the State. These widely scattered small areas within the State will act as demonstration areas, show how timberland should be managed and developed, and will serve as a laboratory station from which private owners may obtain valuable knowledge.

Under this bill, many small unproductive areas in a State can be made productive and a foundation be laid for permanent stability of communities through permanent forests.

There are adequate safeguards set up in this bill so that the State forest units will be properly managed. With State management of the lands and State income out of the lands, the States will gain in resources as well as in forestry knowledge.

Further, forest lands owned by the State may be used for the establishment of Civilian Conservation Corps camps for practically any kind of work of public interest.

The bill is as follows:

(H. R. 6914, 74th Cong., 1st sess.) A BILL To authorize cooperation with the several States for the purpose of stimulating the acquistioa.

development, and proper administration and management of State forests and coordinating Federal and State activities in carrying out a national program of forest-land management, and for other purposes

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the l'nited Status of America in Congress assembled, That for the purpose of stimulating the acquisition, development, and proper administration and management of State forests and of insuring coordinated effort by Federal and State agencies in carrying out a

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