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Sections 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 describe machinery and procedure. The gist of this is that a board of agriculture is created consisting of one member from each State. Members will receive $15 per day and necessary traveling expenses while on official business. They will elect an executive committee of three, each of whom will receive $7,500 per annum.

This executive committee is to advise with the Farm Credit Administration and supervise the work of refinancing farm mortgages. Neither the board nor the executive committee is given absolute power but on the contrary these bodies are cooperative. They receive complaints, report_delinquencies to the executive division of the Government or to the President and act as a go-between. They are really an advisory body. The real truth is that Congressmen now act as chore boys for the people in performing the very work that this board and this executive committee will do after the bill is enacted into law. It is believed that actual experience will prove that little new machinery will be required to operate the act because the bill uses the present set-up of the Farm Credit Administration.

Section 17 extends the benefits of the act to those who have lost their farms since 1921 and to those who desire to repurchase their land or another like farm. Like benefits are also extended to tenants and members of their families.

Provision is made in section 18 for extensions of time of payment in case of crop failures and for other meritorious reasons providing the mortgagor keeps up the payment of all taxes. The bill should be enacted.

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DEEPEN IRRIGATION CHANNEL BETWEEN CLEAR LAKE

AND LOST RIVER, COLO.

MAY 3, 1935.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. ROBINSON, from the Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 6773]

The Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6773) to deepen the irrigation channel between Clear Lake and Lost River, in the State of California, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass.

The purpose of this legislation is to authorize the deepening of the irrigation channel between Clear Lake and Lost River, in the State of California, so as to permit water to be drained from such lake into such river for delivery to the Langell Valley irrigation district, at the Malone Diversion Dam, Klamath County, Oreg., by the Bureau of Reclamation, the cost of which is to be borne by the reclamation fund and repaid to same by the irrigation district.

The passage of this bill was recommended by the Secretary of the Interior in his report of April 23, 1935, which is attached hereto and made a part of this report.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, April 23, 1935. Hon. COMPTON I. WHITE, Chairman Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I have received your letter of March 19 to which is attached a copy of H. R. 6773, introduced by Mr. Pierce, entitled “A bill to deepen the irrigation channel between Clear Lake and Lost River, in the State of California, and for other purposes.

The bill was referred to the Acting Director of the Bureau of the Budget who states that the proposed legislation would not be in conflict with the financial program of the President. Therefore I recommend favorable consideration of the bill. Sincerely yours,

T. A. WALTERS, Acting Secretary of the Interior. O

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MAY 3, 1935.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. SWEENEY, from the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 5723]

The Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, having had under consideration the bill (H. R. 5723) to give certain railway postal clerks the same time credits for promotion purposes as were given others who were promoted on July 1 when automatic promotions were restored, report the same back to the House with the recommendation that the bill do pass.

This bill proposes that those terminal clerks who had earned promotions up to grade 5 on April 1, 1934, but who were prevented from receiving such promotions on account of the economy laws, be advanced to grade 5 regardless of the act of June 14, 1934. The number involved is approximately 550. Had the classification of the terminals not been enacted until after July 1, 1934, this group would have been in grade 5, and except for the prohibition on automatic promotions, which was later lifted and credit given for all time served during that 2-year period, they would also have been in grade 5 on April 1, 1934.

The suspension of promotions under the economy act penalized these employees doubly. They suffered the pay cuts and the loss of promotions. Had not the act of June 14, 1934, been passed, these employees would have received these promotions, but that act permanently deprives them of these earned promotions that would have been made prior to or on April 1, 1934, except for the temporary suspension of promotions under the economy act, which temporary suspension was lifted on July 1, 1934, and promotions were made on July 1, giving credit for service between July 1, 1932, and July 1, 1934, toward earned promotions. Such should be done with all promotions earned but withheld and finally annulled by the provisions of the June 14 act and the decision of the Comptroller General (A-55507).

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