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TRAVELING EXPENSES OF EMPLOYEES TO AND FROM

THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Mar 4, 1935.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. KOCIALKOWSKI, from the Committee on Insular Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 7025]

The Committee on Insular Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 7025) authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to furnish transportation to persons in the service of the United States in the Virgin Islands, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass with the following amendment:

At the end of the bill add:

The Secretary of the Interior is further authorized to provide free transportation of the bodies of deceased persons formerly appointed from the continental United States for employment in the service of the United States in the Virgin Islands, from the post of duty previously held in the Virgin Islands to such destination in the continental United States as may be requested by the deceased person's nearest relatives and/or friends.

Appended hereto is a letter from the Department of the Interior stating the facts.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, January 28, 1935. CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE ON INSULAR AFFAIRS,

House of Representatives, MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: Enclosed is a draft of a proposed bill to authorize payment of traveling expenses of employees to and from the Virgin Islands on authorized leave of absence, or after their separation from the service without prejudice.

When the administration of the Government of the Virgin Islands was placed under the supervision of the Secretary of the Interior by Executive order of Febru. ary 27, 1931, the President authorized the Secretary of the Interior to employ and fix salaries on the administrative force and to furnish to new appointees where necessary free transportation from port of departure in the United States. No return transportation however, was authorized. Under the administration in the Navy Department it was possible to return employees on termination of service or for vacation purposes on their own ships. This means, of course, is not avail. able to the Department of the Interior, and I feel that some liberalization of the present authority is advisable to restore to these employees privileges previously enjoyed and to place them on a more equitable basis with employees of other Government departments serving outside the continental limits.

In order to accomplish this purpose, it is requested that the proposed bill be placed before the House of Representatives for appropriate action. Sincerely yours,

HAROLD L. ICKES,

Secretary of the Interior. O

PROVIDING PUNISHMENT FOR KILLING OR ASSAULTING

FEDERAL OFFICERS

May 4, 1935.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

Mr. MILLER, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 7680]

The Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 7680) to amend the act of May 18, 1934, providing punishment for killing or assaulting Federal officers, after consideration, reports the same favorably to the House with the recommendation that the

bill do pass,

Public, No. 230 of the Seventy-third Congress of which H. R. 7680 is amendatory, makes it a Federal offense to assault or kill certain Federal officers whose duties include the apprehension of law violators. These officers, designated in the act are: United States marshals and their deputies, special agents of the Bureau of Investigation, post-office inspectors, secret-service operatives, officers and enlisted men of the Coast Guard, employees of United States penal and correctional institutions, officers of the Customs Service, the Internal Revenue service, immigrant inspectors, and immigration patrol inspectors.

It now seems desirable to add the following to this list, which is the purpose and effect of the reported bill: Any officer or employee of the Department of Agriculture designated by the Secretary of Agriculture to enforce any act of Congress for the protection, preservation, or restoration of game and other wild birds and animals, any officer or employee of the National Park Service, any officer or employee of or assigned to duty in, the Field Service of the Division of Grazing of the Department of the Interior, or any officer or employee of the Indian Field Service of the United States.

The Attorney General concurs in this proposal as will be observed from the following letter addressed by him to the Chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary. The draft to which the Attorney General refers in his letter was introduced in the House as H. R. 7680, which is the bill here reported.

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE,

Washington, D. C., April 17, 1935. Hon. HATTON W. SUMNERS, Chairman Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives,

Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: In accordance with your request of March 25, 1935, I have carefully considered the bill (H. R. 6476) to amend the act of May 18, 1934, which made it a Federal offense to kill or assault certain Federal officers, by including within its terms, officers and employees of the Department of Agriculture authorized to enforce laws for the protection of wild animals and birds.

I am advised that this proposal is in response to a very urgent need in the administration of the Bureau of Biological Survey of the Department of Agriculture, and I approve its purpose.

My attention has also been called to the necessity of affording similar protection to the personnel of several other groups, such as officers and employees of the National Park Service; officers, employees, and other persons assigned to duty in the Division of Grazing of the Department of the Interior, and officers and employees of the Indian Field Service.

I have prepared a new draft of the bill, which is enclosed herewith, embodying the above-mentioned suggestions as well as certain clarifying amendments, and I recommend the enactment of the bill as so amended. Sincerely yours,

HOMER CUMMINGS,

Attorney General. In compliance with clause 2 A of the rule XIII, there is printed below the existing law with matter proposed to be stricken out in brackets and new matter proposed to be inserted in italics.

"That whoever shall kill, as defined in sections 273 and 274 of the Criminal Code, any United States marshal or deputy United States marshal, special agent of the [Division] Federal Bureau of Investigation of the Department of Justice, post-office inspector, Secret Service operative, any officer or enlisted man of the Coast Guard, any employee of any United States penal or correctional institution, any officer of the Customs Service or of the Internal Revenue Service, any immigrant inspector or any immigration patrol inspector, any officer or employee of the Department of Agriculture to enforce any Act of Congress for the protection, preservation, or restoration of game and other wild birds and animals, any officer or employee of the National Park Service, any officer or employee of, or assigned to duty in, the Field Service of the Division of Grazing of the Department of the Interior, or any officer or employee of the Indian Field Service of the United States, while engaged in the performance of his official duties, or on account of the performance of his official duties, shall be punished as provided under section 275 of the Criminal Code."

O

COMPENSATING THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT FOR THE RETURN OF UNDELIVERABLE LETTERS AND VALUABLE PACKAGES

MAY 4, 1935.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. DOBBINS, from the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 6374)

The Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, having had under consideration the bill (H. R. 6374) providing compensation for the Post Office Department for the extra work involved in the return of valuable packages from the dead-letter office to the writers, report the same back to the House with the recommendation that the bill do pass.

The purpose of the bill is for increasing the fee for the return of ordinary dead letters from 3 to 5 cents, to eliminate to some extent the present cost of handling. During the past year over 11,000,000 dead letters were handled by the Postal Service. The fees for the return of those found returnable provided a revenue of $4.33 per thousand letters, based upon the total number of letters handled; the actual cost of handling was $10.58 per thousand.

The authority requested for the charge of the minimum registration fee of 15 cents for ordinary letters found to contain $1 or more in cash, or first-class parcels containing valuable inclosures, is to offset the present cost of slightly over 29 cents for official registration. Last year the approximate cost of returning dead letters by official registered mail was about $6,000, and the proposed charge of 15 cents in addition to the 5-cent fee will produce about $3,000 in additional revenue to offset the deficit.

This legislation is recommended by the Post Office Department in the following statement:

It is believed that the Post Office Department should be compensated for the extra work involved in the return of valuable parcels from the dead-letter office to the vriters.

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