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CREDITING SUPERINTENDENTS AT CLASSIFIED POST OFFICE STATIONS WITH SUBSTITUTES SERVING UNDER THEM

May 2, 1935.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed:

Mr. ROMJUE, from the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 1993)

The Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, having had under consideration the bill (H. R. 1993) giving superintendents at classified post-office stations credit for substitutes serving under them, report the same back to the House with the following amendments:

In line 10 strike out the comma and insert a colon in lieu thereof.

In lines 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 strike out "and each two thousand four hundred and forty-eight hours of time served by substitutes during the calendar year, including time served as special-delivery messengers, shall be considered as entitling a classified station to å credit of one employee." and insert in lieu thereof the following: Provided, That in determining the number of employees at a classified station credit shall be allowed for service performed by regular employees, substitute employees, temporary employees, and special-delivery messengers assigned to the station, and for each two thousand one hundred and twenty hours of service performed by such employees the station superintendent shall be allowed credit for one additional employee.

Add a new section reading as follows:

Sec. 2. The second proviso of the first paragraph of section 4, the sixth paragraph of section 7, and the eighth and eleventh paragraphs of section 11 of the Act entitled “An Act reclassifying the salaries of postmasters and employees of the Postal Service, readjusting their salaries and compensation on an equitable basis, increasing postal rates to provide for such readjustment, and for other purposes”, approved February 28, 1925, as amended, are amended by striking out the words “three hundred and six days" wherever such words appear in such proviso and in each such paragraph, and inserting in lieu thereof the words “two hundred and sixty-five days”.

So amended, the committee recommends that the bill do pass.

The law provides that the salary of superintendents of classified post-office stations shall be based on the number of employees assigned thereto and the annual postal receipts, each $25,000 of postal receipts being considered equal to one additional employee. No credit, however, is allowed the superintendents for the substitutes serving under them.

It is believed that a station superintendent should have credit for all the employees under his supervision, both regular employees and substitutes, and the committee therefore recommends the passage of the proposed legislation.

The committee amendments are for the purpose of clarifying the language of the bill and also to change the yearly time basis of service so as to bring it in line with present-day conditions.

All the present acts of Congress set up 306 days a year, 8 hours to a day, or 2,448 hours as a year's work for an employee. This is used particularly in providing time credits to substitutes advanced to regular positions. But under present-day conditions, with credit for Sundays, 7 national holidays, 15 days' annual leave, and one-half day each week under the 44-hour week bill, regular employees work but 265 days a year, making a total of 2,120 hours. The bill, therefore, has been amended by the committee in this respect, and similar changes are suggested in existing law to conform thereto.

Hearings were held on the bill at which the Post Office Department's representative voiced the Department's approval of the measure. The Postmaster General's report on the bill reads as follows:

OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER GENERAL,

March 15, 1935. Hon. James M. MEAD, Chairman Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. MEAD: The receipt is acknowledged of your request for a report on H. R. 1993, a bill giving superintendents at classified post-office stations credit for substitutes serving under them.

Pursuant to the act of February 28, 1925, reclassifying the salaries of postmasters and employees of the Postal Service, the Department has considered only regular employees, clerks, carriers, laborers, and other employees who are paid an annual salary and employed regularly 8 hours per day, plus credit for the number of additional employees warranted by the postal receipts in fixing the salary of superintendents and assistant superintendents of classified stations.

The proposed bill amending paragraph 4 of section 3 of the aforementioned named act provides that “Each two thousand four hundred and forty-eight hours of time served by substitutes during the calendar year, including time served as special-delivery messengers, shall be considered as entitling a classified station to a credit of one employee.

While substitute employees may be regularly assigned to stations, their employment is contingent upon no. 1, “The absence of regular employees", and no. 2, “The use of auxiliary to augment the regular forces."

The proposed amendment contemplates that all substitute service be credited to a station. Substitute time used in place of regular men absent for any cause cannot consistently be considered and reckoned in figuring the manpower of a station because the substitute time in question covers only absenteeism and does not increase the number of employees to be supervised even though in some instances it is necessary to employ a substitute 8 hours in place of an absent employee. Therefore, such auxiliary time could not consistently be included in the number of employees used in fixing the salaries of superintendents and assistant superintendents of classified stations.

However, as it is recognized that the regular assignment of substitute employees to a station, including time served as special-delivery messengers, adds to the supervisory responsibility of the superintendent and assistant superintendent, the Department would have no objection to a bill specifically covering “The use of auxiliary to augment the regular forces, including time served as special messengers.”

In other words, the auxiliary hours used in the absence of regular employees shall not be included as a basis for fixing the salary of superintendents and assistant superintendents of classified stations.

It is therefore suggested that following the colon in line 11 of the bill, the following language be substituted:

“And each two thousand four hundred and forty-eight hours of time served by substitutes to augment and not in lieu of the regular forces, including the time served as special-delivery messengers, shall be considered as entitling a classified station to a credit oí one employee.” Very truly yours,

James A. FARLEY,

Postmaster General.

CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

In compliance with paragraph 2a of rule XIII of the House, the changes proposed by the bill (H. R. 1993) in existing law (fourth paragraph of sec. 3 of the act approved Feb. 28, 1925; U.S. C., title 39, sec. 93) are shown as follows (the matter proposed to be stricken out by the bill is shown in black brackets and the new matter proposed to be inserted by the bill is indicated by italics; the existing law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman:)

The salary of superintendents of classified stations shall be based on the number of employees assigned thereto and the annual postal receipts. No allowance shall be made for sales of stamps to patrons residing outside of the territory of the stations. At classified stations each $25,000 of postal receipts shall be considered equal to one additional employee[.) , and each two thousand four hundred and forty-eight hours of time served by substitutes during the calendar year, including time served as special-delivery messengers, shall be considered as entitling á classified station to a credit of one employee.

As amended by the committee, the above would read as follows:

The salary of superintendents of classified stations shall be based on the number of employees assigned thereto and the annual postal receipts. No allowance shall be made for sales of stamps to patrons residing outside of the territory of the stations. At classified stations each $25,000 of postal receipts shall be considered equal to one additional employee [.] ;. Provided, That in determining the number of employees at a classified station credit shall be allowed for service performed by regular employees, substitute employees, temporary employees, and special delivery messengers assigned to the station, and for each two thousand one hundred and twenty hours of service performed by such employees the station superintendent shall be allowed credit for one additional employee.

The other amendments suggested by the committee are also compared with existing law, as follows (the matter proposed to be stricken out by the amendments is indicated by black brackets and the new matter proposed to be inserted by the amendments is indicated by italics; the existing law in which no change is proposed is indicated by roman):

Second proviso of the first paragraph of section 4 of the act approved February 28, 1925 (43 Stat. 1059), as amended by the act of February 28, 1929 (45 Stat. 1405), and the act approved June 27, 1934 (48 Stat. 1265):

Provided further, That hereafter substitute clerks in first and second class post offices and substitute letter carriers in the City Delivery Service when appointed regular clerks or carriers shall have credit for actual time served, including time served as special-delivery messengers, on a basis of one year for each (three hundred and six days] two hundred and sixty-five days of eight hours served as substitute or messenger, and shall be appointed to the grade to which such clerk or carrier would have progressed had his original appointment as substitute been to grade 1. Any fractional part of a year's substitute service will be included with his service as a regular clerk or carrier in the City Delivery Service in determining eligibility for promotion to the next higher grade following appointment to a regular position:

Sixth paragraph of section 7 of the act approved February 28, 1925 (43 Stat. 1062):

All original appointments shall be made to the rank of substitute railway postal clerk, and promotions shall be made successively at the beginning of the quarter following a total satisfactory service of [three hundred and six days] two hundred and sixty-five days in the next lower grade.

Eighth paragraph of section 11 of the act approved February 28, 1925 (43 Stat. 1065):

Substitute clerks in first- and second-class post offices and the Railway Mail Service and substitute letter carriers in the City Delivery Service when appointed regular clerks, railway postal clerks, or carriers shall have credit for actual time served on a basis of one year for each [three hundred and six days] two hundred and sixty-five days of eight hours served as substitute, and appointed to the grade to which such clerk or carrier would have progressed had his original appointinent as substitute been to grade one.

Eleventh paragraph of section 11 of the act approved February 28, 1925 (43 Stát. 1065) as amended by the act approved December 8, 1928 (45 Stat. 1016):

Substitue clerks, substitute garage-men drivers, substitute driver-mechanics, and substitute general mechanics, when appointed regular clerks, garage-men drivers, driver-mechanics, or general mechanics in the motor-vehicle service, shall be given credit for the actual time served as a substitute on the basis of one year for each [three hundred and six days] two hundred and sixty-five days of eight hours, and shall be appointed to the grade to which such clerk, garageman driver, driver-mechanic, or general mechanic, would have progressed had his original appointment as a substitute been made to grade one. Substitute service shall be computed from the date of original appointment as a regular classified substitute, and the salaries of the employees shall be fixed accordingly upon the date of their advancement to a regular position under the Act of February 28, 1925, and thereafter.

O

REFINANCING OF FARM MORTGAGES

MAY 3, 1935.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. GILCHRIST, from the Committee on Agriculture, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 2066)

The Committee on Agriculture, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 2066) to liquidate and refinance agricultural indebtedness at a reduced rate of interest by establishing an efficient credit system, through the use of the Farm Credit Administration, the Federal Reserve banking system, and creating a Board of Agriculture to supervise the same, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass.

STATEMENT

It must be understood at the outset that the bill is not intended to increase farm indebtedness. If a farmer is out of debt he should not be encouraged to go into debt. The bill is designed to refinance existing farm mortgages at low rates of interest and extend them over a long amortization period so that the farmer can keep a home for himself and his wife and children and not suffer them and him to be cast out by the sheriff. The bill will not increase farm debts. It wil however come to the relief of worthy farm people who, in the aggregate, number about one-fourth of our entire population.

Facilities for getting the farmer into debt are already quite adequate, but facilities for getting him out of debt are inadequate. It has now become our duty to provide farm credit at such rates and on such terms as will get farmers out of debt. Then, and not until then, will they acquire buying power and be enabled to enter the markets and take part in business activity and in the restoration of prosperity to the whole country and to all classes of people.

The farmer needs lower rates and better terms. The last issue of the Yearbook of Agriculture (1934) points out that while ordinarily a raduction of indebtedness is a favorable siga, nevertheless the small

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