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no one would be eligible to the benefits of section 2 who was not eligible to the benefits of section 1, which fixes this time limitation.

This act is also comparable with other acts which serve to expedite naturalization of other veterans of the World War in that the veterans benefited by this act are not required to pay the Government the usual naturalization fees.

During announced public hearings on this bill conducted by your committee, no witness appeared to testify in opposition to the enactment of this measure. On the other hand, resolutions adopted at the recent national conventions, respectively, of both the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars were submitted for public record of the hearings and both of these organizations petitioned Congress to enact laws making possible the naturalization of these resident veterans of oriental racial origin. Furthermore, endorsement for this particular bill (H. R. 7170) was submitted, for the public record of the hearings, in the form of a telegram signed “California Joint Immigration Committee”, signed by the chairman and the executive secretary of that group which has been unswerving in advocating the exclusion of orientals under the immigration laws.

In conclusion, your committee feels sure that the prompt enactment of this measure, in the form reported to the House, is simply a measure of justice to resident persons who rendered service in our own armed forces during war time, who notwithstanding racial differences entered our armed forces and fought for this country—some even having seen active service in the fighting zone on foreign soil under the American flag. Some of these oriental veterans of the World War have been so long in the United States or Hawaii that a return to their native country would be almost equivalent to a visit to a foreign or alien country—these are today very largely products of the environments of the United States, and qualified to serve this country acceptably in peace, as citizens, as they did in war, as aliens who declared their allegiance by their oath upon entrance to our armed forces.

Communications relative to facts about these oriental alien veterans of the World War as received by the committee from Government departments are herewith submitted as parts of this report and are as follows: HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS,

Washington, April 6, 1935. Hon. SAMUEL DICKSTEIN, Chairman Committee on Immigration and Naturalization,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. DICKSTEIN: In reply to your letter of April 2 requesting a report giving the number and the names of veterans who served in the Marine Corps and received honorable discharges from service rendered between April 9, 1917. and November 11, 1918, and whose racial origin would entitle them to the benefits of H. R. 7107 if it were enacted into law, I have the honor to inform you that the bill would not apply to any former member of the Marine Corps. Sincerely yours,

John H. RUSSELL, Major General Commandant.

WAR DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF THE NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU,

Washington, April 9, 1935.
Hon. SAMUEL DICKSTEIN,
Chairman Committee on Immigration and Naturalization,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. DICKSTEIN: Receipt is acknowledged of your letter dated April 2, 1935, concerning H. R. 7170, a bill to authorize the naturalization of certain

resident alien World War veterans. The National Guard Bureau has no record
of the veterans of the World War who served in National Guard units. It is
regretted that this Bureau is unable to furnish the list of veterans by names who
would be entitled to the benefits of this act if it were enacted.
Sincerely yours,

E. A. FRY,
Colonel, National Guard Bureau,

(For and in the absence of the

Chief, National Guard Bureau.)

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, April 17, 1935. Hon. SAMUEL DICKSTEIN, Chairman Committee on Immigration and Naturalization,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. DICKSTEIN: Further reference is made to your letter of April 2, 1935, requesting a report on the bill H. R. 7170, Seventy-fourth Congress, first session, to authorize the naturalization of certain resident alien World War veterans, as to the number who served under the jurisdiction of the War Department in the armed forces of the United States and who received honorable discharges from service rendered between April 9, 1917, and November 11, 1918, and whose racial origin would entitle them to the benefits provided in the bill if enacted.

You are advised that the War Department has no compilation from which the information which you desire may be found. To obtain the statistics it would be necessary to examine the individual records of each of the 4,057,101 soldiers of the World War, which, on account of the time required and the expense involved, would be impracticable. I regret that a more favorable report cannot be furnished. Sincerely yours,

Geo. H. DERN, Secretary of War.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
UNITED STATES Coast GUARD,

Washington, April 6, 1935.
Hon. SAMUEL DICKSTEIN,
Chairman Committee on Immigration and Naturalization,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. Sır: In reply to your letter of April 2, 1935 transmitting a copy of H. R. 7170, you are advised that the following-named persons, whose racial origin entitle them to the benefits of the act, served in the Coast Guard between April 9, 1917, and November 11, 1918: Yosokichi Oka, cook

Japan.

Do.
Teddy Hisato Okamato, cabin steward.
Matsunosuke Ono, chief commissary steward.

Do.
Frank Shibata, cabin steward...

Do. Kosuhuburo Shibata, officers' steward, first class.

Do. Somatsu Takamura, cabin steward..

Do. Harry Sanro Takeuchi, seaman.

Do. Kidemitsu, Toyota, commissary steward.

Do. Isbi Watanabe, cook..

Do. Umeshichi Yamabe, wardroom steward.

Do.

Do.
Sehsh Heado, officers' steward, first class.
Toyokichi Kato, cook.---.

Do.
Buichf Matsuura, boy, first class.

Do. Toichi Nishimura, steerage cook.

Do, Unosuko Nishiura, ship's cook-

Do. Frank Fukuhara, wardroom steward.

Do. Eng Seeki Tuen, mess attendant..

China Lew Doom Yang Yen, mess attendant.

Do.
Respectfully,

H. G. HAMLET,
Rear Admiral, United States Coast Guard,

Commandant.

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TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
UNITED STATES Coast GUARD,

Washington, April 8, 1935.
Hon. SAMUEL DICKSTEIN,
Chairman Committee on Immigration and Naturalization,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. SIR: Supplementing our letter of April 6, 1935, you are advised that all the men mentioned therein, with the exception of Toyokichi Kato who deserted, were discharged from the Coast Guard under honorable conditions. Respectfully,

H. G. HAMLET,
Rear Admiral United States Coast Guard,

Commandant.

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY,

Washington, April 15, 1935. The CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE ON IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: H. R. 7170 “To authorize the naturalization of certain resident alien World War veterans”, was forwarded to the Navy Department by the committee on April 2, 1935, with a request for a report giving the number of veterans who served under the jurisdiction of the Navy Department in the armed forces of the United States, and who received honorable discharges from service rendered between April 9, 1917, and November 11, 1918, and whose racial origin would entitle them to the benefits sought to be conferred by the bill, if enacted into law.

The records of the Navy Department show a total of 483 aliens, heretofore ineligible to citizenship because not of a free white person or of African nativity or descent, who served honorably in the United States naval service during the period from April 9, 1917, and November 11, 1918, and who subsequently were honorably discharged from this service. Of this number 420 were Chinese and Japanese, most of whom have since returned to the Orient and thus would not be eligible to the benefits proposed by this bill. Others have died or returned to foreign residences. It is estimated that not more than 25 or 30 remain, out of the total of 483, who might be affected by the enactment of this bill.

To obtain the names of those 25 or 30 men, who might be affected, would require a search of records lasting about 3 weeks. It would then be necessary to ascertain whether each one has maintained a residence within the United States, or any territory thereof, since the date of his discharge, in order to determine the number that would actually be affected. With the limited clerical force available, it is impracticable to give the committee the list of these veterans by name. Sincerely yours,

CLAUDE A. SWANSON.

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE,

Washington, April 22, 1935.
Hon. SAMUEL DICKSTEIN,
Chairman Committee on Immigration and Naturalization,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR CONGRESSMAN DICKSTEIN: As requested in your letter of April 2, I am submitting approximate figures of the number of alien veterans of the World War who have received certificates of naturalization, although racially ineligible for naturalization, and who apparently would be eligible to the benefits of section 2 of bill H. R. 7170, introduced by Congressman Lea. Apparently no complete and accurate lists were kept here of these groups at the time their cases arose, and it has been necessary to make a careful examination of each individual case from incomplete lists which have been located in the files.

Other than the cases of Filipinos, which will be referred to later, the records show 194 alien veterans who rendered the required service in the Army, 105 in the Navy, and 1 in the Coast Guard, a total of 300. In addition to the foregoing, the cases of 73 persons who served in the Army and 26 in the Navy, making 99 possible additional cases, are now being checked by the War and Navy Departments to determine whether the service, rendered by them brings them within

the terms of the bill. As to the Filipinos, the records show 14 of them as having served in the Army and 102 in the Navy, a total of 116.

Lists of the veterans by name, number of certificate issued to each, and the final result upon any final proceedings relating to cancelation, are incomplete, but it is hoped to have their compilation completed and the lists in the hands of your committee by 10:30 tomorrow morning, at the time of the hearing.

This bill appears to be a matter which should be decided by the committee in accordance with the policy with reference to naturalization of veterans who have served in the armed forces of the United States during the World War. Mr. Henry B. Hazard, my assistant, has been instructed to appear before the committee to answer any questions on the technical features of the bill and to furnish you with such statistics as may be desired. Cordially yours,

D. W. MacCORMACK, Commissioner.

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE,

WASHINGTON

Recapitulation
(Submitted during hearings by Mr. Henry B. Hazárd on Apr. 23, 1935)

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Unlisted cases (being verified by War and Navy Departments)

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Unlisted cases (being verified by War and Navy Departments)-Continued

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OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL,

Washington, D. C., April 22, 1935. Hon. SAMUEL DICKSTEIN, Chairman Committee on Immigration and Naturalization,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I have your invitation of April 18 to be represented at a hearing on the bill to authorize the naturalization of certain World War veterans (H. R. 7170).

I find that the effect of the bill is to permit the naturalization of certain aliens, who have been held ineligible to citizenship. Whether the bill should be enacted involves questions of legislative policy as to which I prefer not to express any views, and for that reason I shall not avail myself of your invitation. Sincerely yours,

HOMER CUMMINGS,

Attorney General. In compliance with paragraph 2-A of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, modifications in existing law made by the bill are shown as follows: Pertinent provisions of existing laws are shown in roman; modifications proposed by this bill to be in effect until January 1, 1937, are shown in italics.

NATURALIZATION, CITIZENSHIP, LAWS

CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS

WHO ARE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES Sec. 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.

(Constitution, amendment, Art. XIV.)

STATUTORY PROVISIONS

CITIZENSHIP BY BIRTH IN THE UNITED STATES

(Act of April 9, 1866) SEC. 1992. All persons born in the United States and not subject to any foreign power, excluding Indians not taxed, are declared to be citizens of the United States. (Rev. Stat. 1878; U. S. C. t. 8, sec. 1.)

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