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Of these, Messrs. Lansing, Lane, Gregory, and Redfield have passed on. This act provides that burial shall be without cost to the United States. Following is report from War Department:

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, March 27, 1934. Hon. MORRIS SHEPPARD, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

United States Senate. DEAR SENATOR SHEPPARD: Careful consideration has been given to the bill (S. 3023, 73d Cong.) to amend section 4878 of the United States Revised Statutes as amended, relating to burials in national cemeteries, which was transmitted to the War Department under date of March 12, 1934, with request for information and the views of the Department relative thereto.

The existing law which would be affected by the bill is section 4878 of the United States Revised Statutes.

The bill in question, if enacted into law, would permit the burial in national cemeteries of members of the Cabinet of the President of the United States during the period between April 6, 1917, and November 11, 1918. The War Department has no objection to the passage of the bill. Sincerely yours,

Geo. H. DERN, Secretary of War. The War Department has no objection to the passage of this bill. Letter from the Secretary of War under date of February 15, 1935, giving the views of the Department on S. 1712, follows:

FEBRUARY 15, 1935. Hon. MORRIS SHEPPARD, Chairman Committee on Military Afairs,

United States Senate, DEAR SENATOR SHEPPARD: Careful consideration has been given to the bill (S. 1712, 74th Cong.) to amend section 4878 of the United States Revised Statutes, as amended, relating to burials in national cemeteries, which was transmitted to the War Department under date of February 8, 1935, with request for information and the views of the Department relative thereto.

The existing law which would be affected by the bill is section 4878 of the United States Revised Statutes.

The bill in question, if enacted into law, would permit the burial in national cemeteries of members of the Cabinet of the President of the United States during the period between April 6, 1917, and November 11, 1918. The War Department has no objection to the passage of the bill. Sincerely yours,

Geo, H. DERN, Secretary of War.

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SAFETY ON THE PUBLIC HIGHWAYS OF THE DISTRICT

OF COLUMBIA

APRIL 26, 1935.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. PALMISANO, from the committee of conference, submitted the

following

CONFERENCE REPORT

[To accompany S. 408)

The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the House to the bill (S. 408) to promote safety on the public highways of the District of Columbia by providing for the financial responsibility of owners and operators of motor vehicles for damages caused by motor vehicles on the public highways in the District of Columbia; to prescribe penalties for the violation of the provisions of this Act, and for other purposes, having met, after full and free conference, have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses as follows: That the House recede from its amendment.

VINCENT L. PALMISANO,
WRIGHT PATMAN,

EVERETT M. DIRKSEN,
Managers on the part of the House.

WILLIAM H. KING,
Royal S. COPELAND,

ARTHUR CAPPER,
Managers on the part of the Senate.

STATEMENT OF THE MANAGERS ON THE PART OF THE HOUSE

The managers on the part of the House at the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendment of the House to the bill (S. 408) to promote safety on the public highways of the District of Columbia by providing for the financial responsibility of owners and operators of motor vehicles for damages caused by motor vehicles on the public highways in the District of Columbia; to prescribe penalties for the violation of the provisions of this Act, and for other purposes, submit the following statement in explanation of the effect of the action agreed upon and recommended in the accompanying conference report:

The Senate bill contained a provision that the operation of a motor vehicle in the District of Columbia by a nonresident or his agent should be deemed equivalent to the appointment of the director of vehicles and traffic as the agent of such nonresident for the service of legal process in any action growing out of an accident or collision. The procedure to be followed in connection with any such service was also set forth in the same provision. The House amendment struck out this provision; and the House recedes.

VINCENT L. PALMISANO,
WRIGHT PATMAN,

EVERETT M. DIRKSEN,

Managers on the part of the House. 2

O

NATURALIZATION OF CERTAIN ALIEN VETERANS OF

WORLD WAR

APRIL 26, 1935.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. KRAMER, from the Committee on Immigration and Naturaliza

tion, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 7170)

On page.

The Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 7170) to authorize the naturalization of certain resident alien veterans of the World War, having considered the same, report it back to the House with certain amendments and recommends that bill as amended do pass.

The committee amendments are as follows:

On page 2 in line 4, after the word "April", strike out the numeral “9” and insert in lieu thereof the numeral “6”;

2 in line 7, after the word "service", strike out the semicolon and insert the words "for any reason other than his alienage and insert after the word "alienage” a semicolon;

On page 3 in line 2 after the comma following the word "Act", insert the words "and orders or judgments authorizing such certificates" and insert after the word "certificates" a comma; On

page 3 in line 4, after the word "stamped”, strike out the balance of line 4, insert a comma and the words “declaring their validity under this Act, by the”.

There is no immigration question involved within the provisions of this bill, as reported from the committee, since no one who is not within the United States or not within the Territories of the United States on the date this bill becomes law in its present form will be able to claim any benefits under this legislative measure.

Your committee feels sure this measure, as reported to the House, will not result in any immigration of persons, from oriental countries, who are now excluded under the immigration laws from admission to the United States or Territories thereof.

Unless, independent of the enactment of this bill and in their own rights, they would now be eligible to admission to this country pur

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suant to the limitations of subdivision (c) of section 13 of the Immigration Act of 1924, as amended, the wives and children of such oriental resident World War veterans benefited by this act would not solely by reason of the enactment of this bill thereby gain any additional privilege of admission under the immigration laws.

No oriental World War veteran, otherwise eligible to the benefits of this act, will benefit through the provisions of this act if he is not here in this country when this bill becomes effective by proper enactment.

Paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), and (e) of section 1 of this act define very specifically five prerequisite facts which must first be established before consideration may be given to any application for naturalization under this act. Having first established those prerequisite facts, an applicant seeking original naturalization under this act will then be further required to comply with all the requirements of the uniform naturalization law, that is the naturalization law of June 29, 1906, as amended, except that the applicant will not be required to submit a certificate of arrival nor file a declaration of intention but the applicant is limited in time for the filing of petition for certificate of citizenship. He must file his petition with an appropriate court before January 1, 1937; no petitions for certificates of citizenship may be filed under this act after December 31, 1936.

The necessity for the enactment of this measure arises from a widespread judicial interpretation of certain acts approved in 1918 and 1919, under which interpretations approximately 400, more or less, alien veterans, of oriental racial origin, honorably discharged from service with the armed forces of the United States during the period this country was a participant in the recent World War, had been granted admission to citizenship and had received certificates of citizenship. There are a few additional alien veterans of oriental racial origin who are equally eligible to the benefits of this act on account of their service rendered this country in time of war but who have not heretofore applied for the benefits of previous laws under favorable interpretations as heretofore mentioned.

Notwithstanding the fact that, in several jurisdictions in continental United States and

in Hawaii, Federal courts have granted certificates of citizenship to these veterans of oriental racial origin, the committee was informed officially that proceedings to cancel such certificates, under another section of the naturalization law, have been instituted in only about six cases. However, all of these outstanding certificates have been placed in jeopardy by reason of a decision handed down by the United States Supreme Court in 1925 (Toyota v. United States, 268 U. S. 402), the effect of which was to hold these veterans are not eligible to citizenship, because they are not free, white persons, nor aliens of African nativity, nor persons of African descent. That decision, unless this legislative measure is promptly enacted, may be used as the basis upon which to institute proceedings to cancel these outstanding certificates.

It is the opinion of your committee that, instead of permitting that jeopardy to continue, these certificates should now be made valid by legislative approval of the judicial orders and judgments by which they were originally issued. This purpose will be accomplished by the enactment of section 2 of this act, solely insofar as the racial origin of the veteran is a factor in the validation. By implication the time limit for this validation is fixed as before January 1, 1937, since

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