Defense Aid Supplemental Appropriation Bill, 1941: Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Seventy-seventh Congress, First Session, on the Defense Aid Supplemental Appropriation Bill, 1941, Making Appropriations to Carry Out an Act to Promote the Defense of the United States (H.R. 1776-Public Law No. 11), Approved March 11, 1941

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 4 - Congress, or both, any defense article for the government of any country whose defense the President deems vital to the defense of the United States.
Page 30 - Notwithstanding the provisions of any other law, the President may, from time to time, when he deems it in the interest of national defense, authorize the Secretary of War, the Secretary of the Navy, or the head of any other department or agency of the Government...
Page 5 - ... those whom, in our own self-defense, we are determined thus to aid. The great problem of democracy is to organize and to use its strength with sufficient speed and completeness. The proposed legislation is an essential measure for that purpose. This bill will make it possible for us to allocate our resources in ways best calculated to provide for the security of this Nation and of this continent in the complex and many-sided conditions of danger with which we are and are likely to be confronted....
Page 29 - I think that certainly would be the wish of the committee. Mr. JOHNSON of West Virginia. If you have this central organization created, how large will it be? Do you have any idea how large it will be? Mr. SMITH. I do not at this time. Mr. JOHNSON of West Virginia. Would it be composed of two, three, four, five, or six people? Mr. SMITH. Are you speaking" now with respect to the organization in the Bureau of the Budget? Mr. JOHNSON of West Virginia. Yes. Mr. SMITH. I think that, so far as we are concerned,...
Page 4 - ... whose defense the President deems vital to the defense of the United States, including services and expenses in connection therewith, $175,000,000.
Page 58 - ... (1) Ordnance and ordnance stores, supplies, spare parts, and materials, including armor and ammunition and components thereof, $1,190,000,000.
Page 4 - States, including services and expenses in connection therewith, $200,000,000. (c) Not to exceed 20 per centum of any of the foregoing eight appropriations may be transferred by the President to any other such appropriation, but no appropriation shall be increased by more than 30 per centum. (d) For necessary services and expenses for carrying out the purposes of such Act not specified or included In the foregoing, $40,000,000. (e) For administrative expenses, $10,000,000.
Page 7 - Our safety and the success of the course upon which we have set ourselves demand the courage and the wisdom to go full out in furnishing adequate material aid to the nations whose defense is necessary to our defense. When we do this, we take the most effective step possible in the circumstances to keep war away from our hemisphere, from our own Nation. Doing this, we act in defense of our homes, our institutions, our liberties, our way of life. In this task, half measures will not suffice. There...
Page 5 - The present bill sets up machinery which will enable us to make the most effective use of our resources for our own needs and for the needs of those whom, in our own self-defense, we are determined thus to aid. The great problem of democracy is to organize and to use its strength with sufficient speed and completeness.
Page 4 - HULL, SECRETARY OF STATE Mr. Secretary Hull, the committee is very happy to have you here today, sir, and we will be very glad to have you make such statement as you feel appropriate to be made upon this occasion. GENERAL STATEMENT Secretary HULL.

Bibliographic information