Explaining Auschwitz and Hiroshima: History Writing and the Second World War 1945-1990

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Psychology Press, 1994 - History - 262 pages
Explores the way in which the main combatant societies of the Second World War have historicised that experience. Bosworth argues that the traumatic history of the war has remained crucial to the politics of post-war societies.In this topical book, Bosworth explores the ways in which the main combatant societies of the Second World War have historicised that experience. He argues that in Britain, France, Italy, the USSR and Japan, as well as Germany, the traumatic history of the 'long Second World War' has remained crucial to the culture and politics of their post-war societies. Bosworth examines when, why and with what effect interpretations of the war have shifted, and he analyses major controversies in history writing. Combining a wide-ranging and flexible use of sources from history, documentary and feature film with a unique overview of the historiographical controversies of six countries, Bosworth provides a stimulating and thought provoking excursion into comparative history.

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Contents

The Second World War and the historians
8
The origins of the Third World War and the making of English social history
31
Germany and the Third Second and First World Wars
53
The Historikerstreit and the relativisation of Auschwitz
73
The sorrow and the pity of the fall of France and the rise of French
94
The eclipse of antiFascism in Italy
118
Glasnost reaches Soviet historiography
142
under eastern eyes
167
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