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panions. Randolph pleasantly treats the loss he had sustained in these verses : .

Arithmetic nine digits and no more
Admits of, then I still have all my store ;
For, what mischance hath ta'en froin my left hand
It seems did only for a cypher stand.
But this l'll say, for thee, departed joint,
Thou wert not given to steal, nor pick, nor point
At any in disgrace, but thou didst go
Untimely to thy death, only to shew
The other members what they once must do :
Hand, arm, leg, thigh, and all must follow too..
Oft didst thou scan my verse, where if I miss,
Henceforth I will impute the cause to this.
A finger's loss, (I speak it not in sport)
Will make a verse sometimes a foot too short.
Farewell, dear finger, much I grieve to see,
How soon mischance hath made a hand of thee.

He was much esteemed by the greatest wits of his time, particularly Ben Jonson, who adopted him for one of his sons, a pedantic usurpation by which that writer contrived to draw around him all the young men of talents of his day, who courted his conversation, trumpeted his praises, and flattered his vanity. The way in which Randolph introduced himself to Father Ben, who was already well acquainted with his performances, is thus related by Winstanley.*

“Mr. Randolph having been at London so

* Lives of the English Poets, 1687. 8vo. p. 133.

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. long as that he might truly have had a parley with his empty purse, [the title of one of his poems] was resolved to go and see Ben Jonson with his associates, which he heard at a set time kept a club together at the Devil tavern, near Temple Bar ;* accordingly at the time appointed, he went thither, but being unknown to them, and wanting money, which, to an ingenuous spirit is the most daunting thing in the world, he peeped into the room where they were ; which being espied by Ben Jonson, and seeing him in a scholar's thread-bare habit ; “ John Bo-peep,” says he, “ come in.” Accordingly he did, when immediately they began to rhyme upon the meanness of his clothes, asking him, “ If he could not make a verse ?” and withal to call for his quart of sack. There being four of them, he immediately replied :

I John Bo-peep, to you four sheep,

With each one his good feece,
If that you're willing to give me five shilling,

'Tis fifteen pence a-piece.

to DunWas so,

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* This tavern, which stood near Temple Bar, was so named from its sign being a representation of St. Dunstan taking the devil by the nose with a pair of red hot tongs. Ben Jonson has celebrated it by his Leges Conviviales, which he wrote for the regulation of a club of wits held there in a room dedicated to Apollo. In his time the tavern was kept by Simon Wadloe, who was nicknamed by Ben King of Skinkers. This tavern was purchased by Child's banking-house, and other buildings have been erected on the scite. Pennant's London, page 166.

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panions. Randolph pleasantly treats the loss he had sustained in these verses :

Arithmetic nine digits and no more
Adinits of, then I still have all my store ;
For, what mischance hath ta'en from my left liand
It seems did only for a cypher stand.
But this I'll say, for thee, departed joint,
Thou wert not given to steal, nor pick, por point
At any in disgrace, but thou didst go
Untimely to thy death, only to shew
The other members what they once must do :
Hand, arm, leg, thigh, and all must follow too.
Oft didst thou scan my verse, where if I miss,
Henceforth I will impute the cause to this.
A finger's loss, (I speak it not in sport)
Will make a verse sometimes a foot too short.
Farewell, dear finger, much I grieve to see,
How soon mischance hath made a hand of thee.

He was much esteemed by the greatest wits of his time, particularly Ben Jonson, who adopted him for one of his sons, a pedantic usurpation by which that writer contrived to draw around him all the young men of talents of his day, who courted his conversation, trumpeted his praises, and flattered his vanity. The way in which Rane dolph introduced himself to Father Ben, who was already well acquainted with his performances, is thus related by Winstanley.*

“Mr. Randolph having been at London so

* Lives of the English Poets, 1687. 8vo. p. 133.

long

ARCHBISHOP USHER.

1

This universal scholar and most excellent divine was a native of Dublin, and was born in 1580. His uncle, Dr. Henry Usher, was Archbishop of Armagh, and the principal promoter of the foundation of Trinity College in that city. Another uncle by the mother's side was Richard Stanihurst, a very learned man of the Romish persuasion who published some books against his nephew, but this difference in their sentiments did not emnbitter their disposition towards each other. On the contrary, they kept up a friendly correspondence, and were mutually assisting to each other in their literary pursuits.

James Usher had two aunts who were blind from their cradle and so continued to their deaths, and yet were blessed with admirable understandings, particularly in religion, and of such tenacious memories, that whatever they heard read out of the Scriptures, or was preached to them, they always retained, and became such proficients, that they were able to repeat much of the bible by art, and were the first who taught their nephew to read English. At the bottom of Vertue's portrait of the Archbishop, the two old ladies are represented in the act of instructing him, from a roll resembling a worked sampler.

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He discovered an extraordinary strength of understanding in his earliest years, and we are told that before he had attained his thirteenth year he had acquired a considerable knowledge of history and antiquities, to which study he was prompted by that passage of Cicero, Nescire quid . antea quam natus sis acciderit, id est, semper esse Puerum.

He was the first student who entered of Trinity College, and he made so quick a progress in learning there, that between the age of fifteen and sixteen he had drawn up in Latin an exact Chronicle of the Bible, as far as the Book of Kings, not much differing from the method of his great work entitled, Annals of the Old and New Testament.

When he was eighteen his father died, and he being the eldest son, the paternal estate of course descended to him, but he finding his brother and sisters indifferently provided for, gave up the inheritance to be divided between them; reserving only enough to inaintain him at college and to purchase some necessary books.

It was at this time that he entered the lists of disputation with a learned Jesuit, 'one Henry Fitz-Symonds, then a prisoner in the castle of Dublin, who had sent out a challenge defying the greatest champion and best learned to dispute with him about those points then in controversy between the Roman and Reformed Churches. This challenge was accepted by Usher, and they

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