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THE

COTTAGER’S FRIEND,

AND

GUIDE OF THE YOUNG.

FOR THE YEAR 1843.

VOLUME VIL

LONDON:
PUBLISHED BY JOHN MASON,
AT THE WESLEYAN CONFERENCE OFFICE, 14, CITY-ROAD;

AT 66, PATERNOSTER-ROW.

ROCHE, PRINTER, 25, HOXTON-SQUARE, LONDON.

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MEMOIR OF FRANCES PARKER. FRANCES PARKER was born at Hastings, in the

year 1827. At a very early age she went to live with an uncle and aunt, both of whom soon after became members of the Wesleyan society. She was by them taught to fear God; nor were their instructions vain. When at the age of four years, she went with them to reside at Brighton; and at this place joined the Wesleyan Sunday-school, where her attendance was very regular; and, being a diligent child, she rapidly rose from the second to the highest class. But her perseverance by no means abated; for she committed to memory a larger number of portions of Scripture and hymns than any other child in the school; and being blessed with

very retentive memory, could answer almost any question that was put to her from the word of God. Her love for the Bible was very great, and she could not rest satisfied without having one of her own: this she at last procured entirely with tickets given to her as rewards for her good conduct and regular attendance at school.

The writer resided under the same roof with her for several

years ; and thus, as she was much under his own

B

observation, he had an opportunity of becoming well acquainted with her character. Her temper was exceedingly amiable, and her habits steady and consistent; indeed she was wise and thoughtful above her years. When talked to of Christ, the sinfulness of our nature, and the necessity of having a new heart, she would listen with deep concern, and frequently retired to urge her request at a throne of grace for mercy.

In 1838 the parents of Frances were about to leave England for Sydney. She was to accompany them ; and for that purpose left Brighton to join them. But when the time for sailing approached, she felt reluctant to leave her aunt, who had brought her up

from infancy; and, dreading the moment of parting, she said, " Aunt, I will go back with you to Brighton, if you will allow me." This was readily granted, and she accordingly returned. “And very much pleased we were,” said Mr. Ireland, the Secretary of the school, “ to see our old scholar again take her seat amongst us. looking forward to the time when she should become an efficient Teacher : but this was not to be."

A few weeks after her return, she became very poorly, and lost much of her cheerfulness and activity, On Wednesday, August the 15th, she went into the corn-fields for a walk, but soon returned home very weak. On Thursday she complained of considerable pain; but seemed to improve a little during the day. The next day, however, she was much worse, and it was deemed necessary to call in medical aid. The doctor immediately attended, and at once said that inflammation had taken place, and she was beyond the power of medicine. This did not alarm her; she heard it with resignation, and said, “ Then I shall go to heaven, and see my brother." On being asked why she thought she should go to heaven, her reply was, “Because Jesus Christ died for me, and I love him." Upon her aunt saying,

We were

“For you the elder brethren stay,”

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