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to provide a building over the existing equipment in substandard quonset huts.

Senator STENNIS. You do not have anything here for Cuba, do you?
Admiral Chew. We do not, sir.
Senator STENNIS. That is page 60.

NAVAL FACILITY, RAMEY AIR FORCE BASE, P.R.
Admiral Chew. Next is page 61.

The final shipyard facilities project is at the naval facility located. at the Ramey Air Force Base, P.R. It is for construction of a technical equipment building at the estimated cost of $200,000. This is needed for the same reason as the preceding project but on a smaller scale. The existing quonset hut houses only one set of terminal equipment. This hut is also deteriorated so much that damage to the equipment can only be prevented by construction of the proposed new structure.

Senator STENNIS. All right. Next item.

FLEET BASE FACILITIES JOINT U.S. MILITARY MISSION, GOLCUK, TURKEY

Admiral Chew. There is only one project in this class for an oversea activity. It is for construction of 27 sets of family housing at the estimated cost of $675,000. These units are for 7 married U.S. naval officers and 20 enlisted men and their families assigned to the joint U.S. military mission at Golcuk, Turkey. The mission of this Navy group is to provide to the Turkish Government advice and assistance in matters pertaining to naval operation, training, and maintenance for Turkish naval personnel related to ships, equipment, and ammunition. There are available now only four sets of quarters in quonset huts. Community housing in Golcuk is scarce and substandard. Some resentment is caused by the competition for the more desirable housing since U.S. naval personnel can better afford to pay higher rental charges than the Turkish naval personnel.

Senator STENNIS. You are going to fund those this year?

Admiral CHEW. Yes, sir; these were originally under Commodity Credit and this is to pay the Commodity Credit Corporation back, sir.

Senator STENNIS. Just a matter of bookkeeping?
Admiral Chew. This is bookkeeping; yes, sir.
Senator STENNIS. All right. Next item.

NAVAL WEAPONS FACILITIES Admiral CHEW. The third group of projects for oversea stationsis naval weapons facilities. These include 14 line items at 8 stations at a total cost of $11,718,000 in section 201 and 1 line item at a classified station in the amount of $66,000 in section 202 of the bill. All of these stations directly support the operating forces.

NAVAL AIR STATION, AGANA, GUAM, MARIANA

ISLANDS Page 63, Mr. Chairman. The first project is at the Naval Air Station, Agana, Guam, Mariana Islands, for improvements to aviation fuel system at the estimated cost of $822,000. Fuel delivered from the existing system is far below the quality required for safe flight of aircraft due to the presence of contaminants resulting from the pipeline sludge deposits. The present 8-inch pipeline from the Sasa Valley fuel farm to the air station requires alteration so that the line may be purged of the contaminants by scraping periodically, to guarantee the delivery of clean fuel. In addition, the existing fuel tanks are rusted beyond economical repair and must be replaced. This project will correct this unsafe condition by providing for scraper inserts, sludge tanks, three underground fuel tanks plus the related facilities needed to make this a usable system.

Senator STENNIS. Those are a few remnants that are left, Senator Engle, throughout the world. They have been modernizing, as you know, on this fuel system, and I think they are about through.

NAVAL STATION, ARGENTIA, NEWFOUNDLAND Admiral Chew. The next one is page 64 for construction of a communication land line at an estimated cost of $462,000.

Senator STENNIS. What is that?

Admiral Chew. These are underground cables between the two sections of the field, and they are deteriorated beyond economical replacement.

Senator STENNIS. Without objection.
Next item.

NAVAL AIR STATION, ATSUGI, JAPAN Admiral CHEW. Page 65. These are for two line items at Atsugi, Japan, for $416,000.

The first is for construction of a liquid oxygen plant, and the second is for electrical power plant at an estimated cost of $35,000—the former is at an estimated cost of $61,000, sir.

Normally, in the United States, we buy our liquid oxygen. Unfortunately in Japan, it is not up to our specifications and cannot be used, so we have to provide our own generating equipment for liquid oxygen in Japan.

Senator STENNIS. You have to put up your own powerplants there, too, is that right?

Admiral Chew. We are buying our power from the Japanese, but they have 50-cycle power, and certain of our electronic equipment needs 60-cycle power. This is to provide for those safety aids, radars, and so on, that operate on 60-cycle.

STENNIS. Is the powerplant to run the liquid oxygen plant?

No, sir.

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weathertight, are not structurally sound and are in a condition to be surveyed. The Air Force messhalls cannot accommodate the Navy's requirement. The proposed messhall will be designed to serve 702 enlisted men.

The final line item is for construction of bachelor officers' quarters at the estimated cost of $478,000. Existing BOQ's are structurally substandard and extremely overcrowded as they provide less than 50 percent of the standard space allowance. One of these BOQ's is adequate for accommodating 40 officers as compared to the estimated requirement for 104 spaces. The proposed BOQ, will relieve this deficiency to a considerable extent by providing space for 50 officers.

Senator STENNIS. We have to settle a basic situation here. Mr. Clerk, we want to find out with respect to the request of the Navy, the Air Force, and the Army, if there is any for this Okinawa situation.

I was amazed, gentlemen, to find for several years each of the main, the principal, political parties had had it in their platform on each election that they wanted to go back, to be a part of Japan or, that is, affiliate with Japan, and I just do not know. They seem to be dissatisfied.

I could imagine what was there since we went in, and to see what was there since, and the payrolls involved. But I have looked through your items here, and I think the detail is all right, but the basic question is still looming in my mind as to how far we are going to go on these matters.

Admiral CHEW. Well, I think, Mr. Chairman, as Admiral Wilson said, we have given this every consideration as to our permanency, and this is a genuine requirement, no question about it.

Senator STENNIS. Some say that Formosa is indispensable to our protection, it is our frontier, and we will have to support it; and others say, no, Okinawa; and someone else, thought we had in Subic Bay, where we could take care of most of the situations that could arise.

Admiral Wilson. That is a considerable distance there between Subic Bay and

Senator STENNIS. I know. But I am concerned about our political situations, if we may classify it that way, and I know you are.

I think you ought to make a special showing on that or get the State Department to make a special showing on it for us here, and wrap it all up.

Mr. Clerk, put it down. What do you suggest on that, Admiral ? Admiral WILSON. I certainly see no objection to it.

Senator STENNIS. I mean on this whole question, on this whole problem here? Is there anything you want to say, or someone else in the Navy, say something about it?

Admiral CHEW. I would suggest, Mr. Chairman, if it is agreeable with Admiral Wilson, that we provide a statement for the committee on this.

Senator STENNIS. I think it will take more than a statement. Anyone who has been over there gets an impression and a feeling, and I just

not think anything can be more uncertain than what our tenure I what our situation may be out there.

with asbestos siding; that is about as low-maintenance-type structure as you can build for that kind of facility.

Admiral Chew. And that again is a safety item, Senator Engle, because the present safety aids operate on 60-cycle current, and the present converters, and the hodgepodge of equipment are not reliable, and this was determined to be the cheapest way of doing it.

Senator ENGLE. I am relieved to know you have in mind that we may get the old heave-ho.

Admiral CHEW. Yes, sir.

Admiral PELTIER. However, on Okinawa you have typhoon conditions that you have to take into consideration.

Senator STENNIS. All right. Let us come back to Okinawa. That is page 67. NAVAL AIR FACILITY, NAHA, OKINAWA,

RYUKYU ISLANDS Admiral CHEW. Yes, sir. The fifth project consists of four line items for a total amount of $5,943,000 at the Naval Air Facility, Naha, Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands. The mission of this station is similar to those of the other U.S. Navy stations in the Western Pacific area. The Navy is responsible for providing its own "housekeeping" facilities as a tenant on a U.S. Air Force base, but uses the main airfield facilities in common with the Air Force.

Senator STENNIS. You have $4,358,000 of appropriated money for family housing. · Admiral CHEW. The first line item is for 200 units of family housing, Mr. Chairman. I believe it is plainly evident that the need for these family housing units is very urgent.

To include this line item in a small, tight and austere program, and to forego efforts to secure other essential operational faciltiies in favor of this item, I think, is indicative of its pressing need.

Married officers and enlisted men, separated from their families for extended period in other than wartimes, do not perform well, and we have a terrific situation. As you went through in Okinawa, I am sure they showed you the 31 quonset huts at the naval air facility which are almost a disgrace.

Senator STENNIS. Yes. • Admiral Chew. This is to provide housing for our personnel in Okinawa.

The second line item is for construction of barracks, at the estimated cost of $809,000, for berthing 332 enlisted men. There are now permanent barracks for housing 370 enlisted men. However, approximately 568 permanently based enlisted men are living in quonset huts at the station. In this climate the huts deteriorate rapidly and afford poor protection against the prevalent dampness and torrential rains. Completion of the new barracks will serve to remove the present berthing inequities and boost the morale of the men serving on this remote island. The substandard huts will then be demolished.

The third line item is for construction of messhall at the estimated cost of $298,000. The existing messhall consists of World War II quonset huts loaned to the Navy by the Air Force, located about 1 mile from the existing permanent Navy barracks. The huts are not

weathertight, are not structurally sound and are in a condition to be surveyed. The Air Force messhalls cannot accommodate the Navy's requirement. The proposed messhall will be designed to serve 702 enlisted men.

The final line item is for construction of bachelor officers' quarters at the estimated cost of $478,000. Existing BOQ's are structurally substandard and extremely overcrowded as they provide less than 50 percent of the standard space allowance. One of these BOQ's is adequate for accommodating 40 officers as compared to the estimated requirement for 104 spaces. The proposed BOQ will relieve this deficiency to a considerable extent by providing space for 50 officers.

Senator STENNIS. We have to settle a basic situation here.

Mr. Clerk, we want to find out with respect to the request of the Navy, the Air Force, and the Army, if there is any for this Okinawa situation.

I was amazed, gentlemen, to find for several years each of the main, the principal, political parties had had it in their platform on each election that they wanted to go back, to be a part of Japan or, that is, affiliate with Japan, and I just do not know. They seem to be dissatisfied.

I could imagine what was there since we went in, and to see what was there since, and the payrolls involved. But I have looked through your items here, and I think the detail is all right, but the basic question is still looming in my mind as to how far we are going to go on these matters.

Admiral CHEW. Well, I think, Mr. Chairman, as Admiral Wilson said, we have given this every consideration as to our permanency, and this is a genuine requirement, no question about it.

Senator STENNIS. Some say that Formosa is indispensable to our protection, it is our frontier, and we will have to support it; and others say, no, Okinawa; and someone else, thought we had in Subic Bay, where we could take care of most of the situations that could arise.

Admiral Wilson. That is a considerable distance there between Subic Bay and

Senator STENNIS. I know. But I am concerned about our political situations, if we may classify it that way, and I know you are.

I think you ought to make a special showing on that or get the State Department to make a special showing on it for us here, and wrap it all up. Mr. Clerk, put it down. What do you suggest on that, Admiral? Admiral WILSON. I certainly see no objection to it.

Senator STENNIS. I mean on this whole question, on this whole problem here? Is there anything you want to say, or someone else in the Navy, say something about it?

Admiral CHEW. I would suggest, Mr. Chairman, if it is agreeable with Admiral Wilson, that we provide a statement for the committee on this.

Senator STENNIS. I think it will take more than a statement. Anyone who has been over there gets an impression and a feeling, and I just do not think anything can be more uncertain than what our tenure is or what our situation may be out there.

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