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THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE 1. Berger, “Executive Privilege v. Congressional Inquiry," 12 U.C.L.A. Laro Reviere 1044 (1965).

2. Bishop, "The Executive's Right of Privacy,” 66 Yale Law Journal 477 (1958).

3. Collins, “The Power of Congressional Committees of Investigation to Obtain Information from the Executive Branch: The Argument for the Legislative Branch," 39 Georgetoun Law Journal 563 (1951).

4. Hardin, "Executive Privilege in Federal Courts," 71 Yale Law Journal 879 (1962).

5. Kramer & Marcuse, “Executive Privilege-A Study of the Period 19531960,” 29 George Washington Law Review, 623. 827 (1961).

6. Rogers, “The Papers of the Executive Branch," 44 American Bar Associ. ation Journal 941 (1958).

7. Schwartz, “A Reply to Mr. Rogers: The Papers of the Executive Branch," 45 American Bar A88ociation Journal 467 (1959).

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