Sir Edward Seaward's Narrative of His Shipwreck, and Consequent Discovery of Certain Islands in the Caribbean Sea: With Details of His Residence There, and of Various Extraordinary and Highly Interesting Events in His Life, from the Year 1733 to 1749, as Written in His Own Diary, Volume 1

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Page 57 - Lord; and thou didst deliver us out of our distress. Blessed be thy name, who didst not despise the prayer of thy servants; but didst hear our cry, and hast saved us. Thou didst send forth thy commandment ; and the windy storm ceased, and was turned into a calm.
Page 57 - The waters of the sea had wellnigh covered us ; the proud waters had wellnigh gone over our soul. The sea roared; and the stormy wind lifted up the waves thereof. We were carried up as it were to heaven, and then down again into the deep ; our soul melted within us, because of trouble.
Page 57 - Praised be the Lord daily ; even the Lord that helpeth us, and poureth his benefits upon us. He is our God, even the God of whom cometh salvation : God is the Lord, by whom we have escaped death. Thou, Lord, hast made us glad through the operation of thy hands ; and we will triumph in thy praise.
Page 45 - I will go cheerfully now." I took two of the muskets, and gave to her a boarding-pike to carry as a staff, and to have recourse to for defence, if necessary ; and, with our faithful little dog, we descended at one step from the brig's side to the rock. I shouldered...
Page 47 - We lay down in peace and thankfulness ; but notwithstanding this happy frame of mind, our slumbers were disturbed, by the noises of the preceding night yet ringing in our ears. We arose with the dawn, the cool freshness of which was truly delightful : a couple of oranges, with biscuit, was our breakfast ; and, still finding water in the tea-kettle, we drank some of it, mixed with a little wine. " Now, my Eliza," said I, " will you venture on shore, and let us explore the other side of the isthmus?"...
Page 35 - I now looked earnestly around me ; the mainmast was gone, but the stump was standing ; the wreck of it had been cleared away ; the foremast remained, but the fore-topmast had gone, and was hanging by its rigging forward ; the booms were gone, the boats were gone, the gabbose, for cooking, gone, the binnacle gone : the hen-coops alone remained in their places ; but all the fowls...
Page 35 - I discovered high land a-head and a-stern, and a fine sandy beach a--breast of us, little more than a mile off. I hastened below to my dear wife, into the dark cabin, exclaiming, " Come to me, my love; come on deck ; it is daylight !" Without a word, she made her way to me, and ascended the ladder. On emerging from darkness into light, her feelings overcame her, and she poured forth her heart to God. After a few moments of abstraction, she crept down to the lee gunwale of the quarter-deck; " Where...
Page 35 - ... rigging forward ; the booms were gone, the boats were gone, the gabbose, for cooking, gone, the binnacle gone : the hen-coops alone remained in their places ; but all the fowls, and guinea-fowls, that were in the coop to leeward, were drowned : the ducks which were in the other coop survived, and also four fowls; yet these seemed more dead than alive. All was desolation on deck and aloft; but the day had dawned, and the morning smiled serenely on us, while a gentle calm spread itself over the...
Page 33 - Fidele, howled mournfully as he was driven to the further end of the cabin : this, at such a moment, had a powerful effect on us. " We are indeed lost ! " said my wife, as she recovered a little from the fall she had just received. I did not now wait to console her by my words : I renewed my efforts to force the companion door, and get upon deck ; but it was perfect darkness where we were, and I could not find...
Page 32 - I feel that we are safe, notwithstanding this dreadful hurricane : but," added she, pressing my hand and moving it to her lips, " if we should be drowned, we shall die together and we shall not be separated : we shall meet, where where we can part no more." Her feelings now overpowered her, and she fell on my neck and wept. I kissed away the tears from her eyes, saying, " We will trust in the Almighty.

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