Dictionary of Americanisms: A Glossary of Words and Phrases Usually Regarded as Peculiar to the United States

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Little, Brown,, 1877 - Americanisms - 813 pages

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Page 403 - as a principle, in which the rights and interests of the United States were involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European power.
Page 99 - He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him. captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to more miserable death in
Page 669 - bright stars, through the perilous tight, O'er the ramparts we watch'd were so gallantly streaming? And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there; Oh ! say, does that
Page 432 - Union. The North in an unrestrained intercourse with the South, protected by the equal laws of a common government, finds in the productions of the latter great additional resources of maritime and commercial enterprise, and precious materials of manufacturing industry. The South, in the same intercourse, benefiting by the agency of the North, sees its agriculture grow and its commerce expand.
Page 669 - *'Oh ! say, can you sec, by the dawn's early light, What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming; Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous tight, O'er the ramparts we
Page 67 - But the hands that were played By that heathen Chinee, And the points that he made Were quite frightful to see,— Till at last he put down a right bower, Which the same Nye had dealt unto me. Bret Harte, The Heathen Chinee.
Page 184 - for the ship's use ; and asked me what I would have for it. I told him that I could not offer to make any price of the boat, but left it entirely to him ; upon which he told me he would give me a note of hand to pay me eighty pieces of
Page 704 - I regret to see that vile and barbarous vocable, talented, stealing out of the newspapers into the leading reviews and most respectable publications of the day. Why not shillinged, farthinged, tenpenced, &c. ? The formation of a participle passive from a noun is a license that nothing but a very peculiar
Page 265 - There are notes of joy from the hang-bird and wren, And the gossip of swallows through all the sky; The ground-squirrel gaily chirps by his den, And the wilding-bee hums merrily by. The
Page 107 - is in John Adams's Diary, under date of February, 1763, where he says : — This day learned that the caucus club meets, at certain times in the garret of Tom Dawes, the adjutant of the Boston regiment. — Works,

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