Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed]
[graphic]
[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

SU BCOMMITTEE ON DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE APPROPRIATIONS

GEORGE H. MAHON, Texas, Chairman
ALBERT GORE, Tennessee

JOHN TABER, New York
ROBERT E. LAMBERT, Executive Secretary to Subcommittee

Printed for the use of the Committee on Appropri

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1952

326633
AS2
1953

COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

CLARENCE CANNON, Missouri, Chairman JOHN H. KERR, North Carolina

JOHN TABER, New York GEORGE H. MAHON, Texas

RICHARD B. WIGGLESWORTH, Massachusetts HARRY R. SHEPPARD, California BEN F. JENSEN, Iowa ALBERT THOMAS, Texas

H. CARL ANDERSEN, Minnesota MICHAEL J. KIRWAN, Ohio

WALT HORAN, Washington W. F. NORRELL, Arkansas

GORDON CANFIELD, New Jersey ALBERT GORE, Tennessee

IVOR D. FENTON, Pennsylvania JAMIE L, WHITTEN, Mississippi

LOWELL STOCKMAN, Oregon GEORGE W. ANDREWS, Alabama

JOHN PHILLIPS, California JOHN J. ROONEY, New York

ERRETT P. SCRIVNER, Kansas J. VAUGHAN GARY, Virginia

FREDERIC R. COUDERT, JR., New York JOE B. BATES, Kentucky

CLIFF CLEVENGER, Ohio
JOHN E. FOGARTY, Rhode Island

EARL WILSON, Indiana
HENRY M. JACKSON, Washington NORRIS COTTON, New Hampshire
ROBERT L. F. SIKES, Florida

GLENN R. DAVIS, Wisconsin
ANTONIO M. FERNANDEZ, New Mexico BENJAMIN F. JAMES, Pennsylvania
WILLIAM G. STIGLER, Oklahoma GERALD R. FORD, JR., Michigan
E. H. HEDRICK, West Virginia

FRED E. BUSBEY, Illinois
PRINCE H. PRESTON, JR., Georgia GEORGE B, SCHWABE, Oklahoma
OTTO E. PASSMAN, Louisiana

FRED G. AANDAHL, North Dakota
LOUIS C. RABAUT, Michigan
DANIEL J. FLOOD, Pennsylvania
CHRISTOPHER C. MCGRATH, New York
SIDNEY R. YATES, Illinois
FOSTER FURCOLO, Massachusetts
FRED MARSHALL, Minnesota
WINFIELD K, DENTON, Indiana
JOHN J. RILEY, South Carolina
ALFRED D. SIEMINSKI, New Jersey

GEORGE Y. HARVEY, Clerk

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

HON. THOMAS K. FINLETTER, SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE
HON. R. L. GILPATRIC, UNDERSECRETARY
GEN. HOYT S. VANDENBERG, CHIEF OF STAFF
GEN. NATHAN F. TWINING, VICE CHIEF OF STAFF
LT. GEN. C. B. STONE, III, DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF, COMPTROLLER
MAJ. GEN. MANUEL J. ASCENSIO, DIRECTOR OF BUDGET
BRIG. GEN. THETUS C. ODOM, DEPUTY FOR PROGRAM

Mr. Mahon. The committee will come to order.
We will begin our proceedings.

Secretary Finletter, we are pleased to have you and the Under
Secretary, Mr. Gilpatric, and the Chief of Staff, General Vandenberg,
and other members of your staff, including General Stone and General
Asensio.
Will you please proceed with your general statement at this time?

GENERAL STATEMENT OF SECRETARY FINLETTER
Secretary FINLETTER. Mr. Chairman and members of the committee,
we hereby present to Congress the Air Force budget for fiscal year1953.

This budget asks for new obligational authority for the fiscal year
1953 in the amount of $20.7 billion, exclusive of appropriations for
public works which are to be presented separately.

Under this $20.7 billion appropriation the Air Force would move from its presently authorized 80 combat wings, 15 troop-carrier groups, and support units toward a force of 126 combat wings, 17 troop-carrier groups, and support units.

The mere statement of numbers of wings does not tell the importance of this appropriations request. The importance lies in what this 126 combat-wing force, when it comes into being, will do to prevent the happening of war.

The Air Force today is already a strong force. It now consists of 75 combat wings, 15 troop-carrier groups, and support units. However, many of these wings and other units are not fully modernized.

The present force, as I have said, is a strong one. It is doing its part in making it obvious that the free world is capable of defending itself and that an attack on us would be most unprofitable.

The 126 combat-wing force looks ahead a few years and prepares for the different conditions of that time—a time when possible enemies will be stronger than now, especially in atomic weapons, a time when the power and carrying capacity of United States air also will have to be much greater than it is now, if we and the rest of the free world are to be safe.

« PreviousContinue »