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When the next holidays were in approach, Gemellus received the following letter from his brother. « BROTHER GEMELLUS,

you have duly repented of your behaviour « to me, and will signify your contrition, asking “ pardon as becomes you for the violence you “ have committed, I will intercede with my « father, and hope to obtain his permission for

your coming home in the ensuing holidays: “ If not, you must take the consequences and “ remain where you are, for on this condition “only I am to consider myself, « Your affectionate brother,

« GEMINUS." To this letter Gemellus returned an answer as follows.

“ DEAR BROTHER, “I am sorry to find you still bear in mind a, boyish quarrel so long past; be assured I have “ entirely forgiven your behaviour to me, but I “cannot recollect any thing in mine to you, “ which I ought to ask your pardon for : What“ ever consequences may befal me for not com“plying with your condition, I shall remain “ Your affectionate brother,

“ GEMELLUS."

N. LXIII.

ÑO LXIII.

T

Naturâ illi pater es, confiliis egou

(TERENT.) By nature yqu’re his father; I by counsel.

(COLMAN.) HIS letter fixed the fate of Gemellus: Re.

sentments are not easily dislodged from narrow minds; Euphorion had not penetration to distinguish between the characters of his children; he saw no meanness in the fly insidious manners of his homebred favourite, nor any sparks of generous pride in the steady inflexibility of Gemellus ; he little knew the high principle of honour, which even the youngest spirits come municate to each other in the habits and manners of a public school. He bitterly inveighed against his neighbour the lawyer for persuading him to such a fatal fyftem of education, and whenever they met in company their conversa. tion was engroffed with continual arguings and reproachings; for neither party receded from his point, and Gemellus's advocate was as little difpofed to give him up, as his father was to excufe him. At laft they came to a compromise, by which Euphorion agreed to charge his eftate VOL. III.

C

with

with an annuity for the education and support of Gemellus, which annuity during his nonage was to be received and administered by the faid awyer, and Geminus left heir of his whole fortune, this moderate encumbrance excepted.

The disinterested and proscribed offender was now turned over to the care of the lawyer, who regularly defrayed his school expences, and never failed to visit him at those periods, when country practitioners usually refort to town. The boy, apprized of his situation, took no further pains to assuage his father's resentment, but full of resources within himself, and possessed of an active and aspiring genius, pressed forward in his business, and soon found himself at the head of the school, with the reputation of being the best scholar in it.

He had formed a close friendship, according to the custom of great schools, with a boy of his own age, the fon of a nobleman of high distinction, in whole family Gemellus was a great favourite, and where he never failed to pass his holidays, when the school adjourned. His good friend and guardian the lawyer faw the advantages of this early connection in their proper light, and readily consented to admit his ward of the fame college in the university, when Gemellus and his friend had compleated their school

education.

education. Here the attachment of these young men became more and more solid, as they advanced nearer to manhood, and after a course of academical studies, in which Gemellus still improved the reputation he brought from Westminster, it was proposed that he should accompany his friend upon his travels, and a proper governor was engaged for that service. This proposal rather staggered Gemellus's guardian on the score of expence, and he now found it necessary for the first time to open himself to Euphorion. With this intent he called upon him one morning, and taking him afide, told him, he was come to confer with him on the subject of Gemellus-" I am sorry for it,” interposed Euphorion. “Hold, Sir,” answered the lawyer, “interrupt me not, if you please; tho' “ Gemellus is my ward, he is your son; and if

you have the natural feelings of a father, you « will be proud to acknowledge your right in “ him as such.”-As he was speaking these words, an awkward servant burst into the room, and staring with fright and confusion, told his master there was a great lord in a fine equipage had actually driven up to the hall door, and was asking to speak with him. Euphorion's surprize was now little less than his servant's, and not being in the habit of receiving visits from people

with an annuity for the education and fur: Gemellus, which annuity during his nona to be received and administered by t awyer, and Geminus left heir of his who tune, this moderate encumbrance except?

The disinterested and profcribed offend now turned over to the care of the lawye regularly defrayed his school expences, ai. ver failed to visit him at those periods, country practitioners usually resort to The boy, apprized of his situation, took ry ther pains to assuage his father's refentmen full of resources within himself, and pole an active and aspiring genius, pressed forv: his business, and soon found himself at the of the school, with the reputation of bein. best scholar in it.

He had formed a close friendship, acc to the custom of great schools, with a boy own age, the fon of a nobleman of high di tion, in whose family Gemellus was a gre. vourite, and where he never failed to pa holidays, when the school adjourned. His friend and guardian the lawyer faw the a. tages of this early connection in their y light, and readily consented to admit his wi. the same college in the university, when.Ge lus and his friend had co! at their í

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