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was settled at Trumpington near Cambridge, and left two sons, both of whom died unmarried. His second wife was Frances, daughter of lord Willoughby of Parham, by whom he had nine children. His third wife was Mrs. Wilson, a widow, whose maiden name was Carleton. She survived him, and by her also he bad several children. The eldest of this last marriage inherited Chilton Park.

The editor of his “Memorials" gives him this character. “ He not only served the state in several stations and places of the highest trust and importance both at home and in foreign countries, and acquitted himself with success and reputation answerable to each respective character; but likewise conversed with books, and made himself a large provision from his studies and contemplation. Like that noble Roman, Portius Cato, as described by Nepos, he was "Reipublicæ peritus, et jurisconsultus, et magnus imperator, et probabilis orator, cupidissimus literarum :' a statesman and learned in the law, a great commander, an eminent speaker in parliament, and an exquisite scholar. He had all along so much business, one would not imagine he ever had leisure for books; yet who considers his studies might believe he had been always shut up with his friend Selden, and the dust of action never fallen on his gown. His relation to the public was such throughout all the revolutions, that few mysteries of state could be to him any secret. Nor was the felicity of his pen less considerable than his knowledge of affairs, or did less service to the cause he espoused. So we find the words apt and proper for the occasion; the style clear, easy, and without the least force or affectation of any kind, as is shewn in his speeches, bis narratives, bis descriptions, and in every place where the subject deserves the least care or consideration." Lord Clarendon has left tbis testimony in favour of Whitelocke : whom, numbering among his early friends in life, he calls, a man of eminent parts and great learning out of his profession, and in his profession of signal reputation. And though,” says the noble historian, “he did afterwards bow his knee to Baal, and so swerved from his allegiance, it was with less rancour and malice than other men. He never led, but followed ; and was rather carried away with the torrent than swam with the stream; and failed through those infirmities, which less than a general defection and a prosperous rebellion could never have discovered.” Lord Clarendon has elsewhere described him, as “ from the beginning concurring with the parliament, without any inclinations to their persons or principles; and,” says be, “ he bad the same reasons afterwards not to separate from them. All his estate was in their quarters; and he had a nature, that could not bear or submit to be undone : though to his friends, who were commissioners for the king, he used his old openness, and professed his detestation of all the proceedings of his party, yet could not leave them.”

The first edition of his " Memorials of the English Affairs," was published in 1682, and the second, with many additions and a better Index, in 1732: called “An historical Account of what passed from the beginning of the reign of king Charles the First to king Charles the Second his happy Restauration ; containing the public transactions civil and military, together with the private consultations and secrets of the Cabinet,” in folio, Besides these memorials, he wrote also “Memorials of the English Affairs, from the supposed expedition of Brute to this island, to the end of the reign of king James the First. Published from bis original manuscript, with some account of his life and writings, by William Penn, esq. governor of Pennsylvania ; and a preface by James Welwood, M.D. 1709," folio. There are many speeches and discourses of Mr. Wbitelocke to be found. in his "Memorials of English Affairs," and in other collections. Oldmixon, who stands at the bead of infamous historians, bas drawn a comparison between Whitelocke and Clarendon; there is also an anonymous pamphlet entitled “ Clarendon and Whitelocke farther compared," which was written by Mr. Jobn Davys, some time of Harthall, Oxford. It ought to be remarked that our author's “ Memorials" are his Diary, and that be occasionally entered facts in it when they came to his knowledge : but not always on those days in which they were transacted. This has led his readers into some anachronisms. It has been remarked also that his " Memorials" would have been much more valuable, if his wife had not burnt many of his papers. As they are, they contain a vast mass of curious information, and are written with impartiality.'

1

Biog. Brit.--His “ Memorials” and Swedish Embassy.

INDEX

TO THE

THIRTY-FIRST VOLUME.

Those marked thus * are new.
Those marked † are re-written, with additions.

Page
+Wall, John..

+Ward, Edward ...
t

John.
十 Samuel

Seth ...

Thomas
+Ware, James,

Robert,
Wargentin, Peter..
+Warham, William.
*Waring, Edward
+Warner, Ferdinando.

Dr. John..
John ..
Joseph
· Richard

William
Warton, Thomas

Joseph
Warwick, Philip
*Wase, Christopher
*Washington, George.
*Wasse, Joseph ...
*Waterhouse, Edward
+Waterland, Daniel .
Watson, David

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*

*

1
William

3
*Wallace, sir William.

4
Waller, Edmund

6
sir William. . 25
+Wallis, John...

28
- John, botanist. . 47
*Walmesley, Charles

48
Walpole, sir Robert .. 49

Horatio, lord Wal-
pole ...

55
-Horace, lord Orford 56
*Walsh, Peter ...

67
William.

68
+Walsingham, Francis,

69
十 +

Thomas. 78
*Walstein, Albert....

ib.
Walton, Brian..

80
George

S4
Isaac..

.85
*Wandesford, Christopher ... 91
+Wanley, Humphrey

93
Wansleb, John Michael . 96
*Warburton, John ..... 97

William 100

Page
129
123

127
: 129
. 136
, 137
145
146

ib.
152
155
. 157

158
. 169

..163

. 164
. 167
.. 185

196
199
. 201

. 210

212
213

..219

John.

Page

Page
*Watson, Henry..

219 *Weston, Edward ... .320
James, printer ...223 *Wetenhall, Edward. .. ib.
James, lawyer ... 224 · Wetstein, John James ....322
296

John Rodolph .. 324
Richard ..

229 *Whalley, Peter .... ib.
Robert

237 *Wharton, Thomas, marquis 326
- Thomas, bishop . . 239

Philip, duke.... 330
Thomas, noncon. 240

sir George. . 337
William
241 +

Henry... 338
Watteau, Anthony.. 248

Dr. Thomas. 349
+Watts, Isaac ..

249

+Whately, William .. 350
William
254 Wheare, Degory

352
*Waynflete, William . 255 *Wheatley, Charles.. 353
Webb, Phil. Carteret 258

Francis.. 354
*Webbe, George.

261 *Wheelocke, Abraham 355
*Webber, John.

262 Wheler, sir George. 356
+ Webster, William

. ib. *Whethamstede, John. 358
Wechel, Christopher. . 264 *Whetstone, George.. 359
Andrew.

265 Whichcote, Benjamin 360
*Wedderburn, Alex..

ib. Whiston, William.. 366
*Wedgwood, Josiah 268 *Whitaker, John

..378
Weever, John..

071
- William

.383
*Weisse, Christopher Felix. . 272 Whitby, Daniel. .. 388
*Welchman, Edward . .. ib. *White, Gilbert

396
*Wells, Edward

274

Henry Kirke.. 397
Samuel ...

275 t-

John, bishop. 401
Welsted, Leonard.

276

John, lawyer. 403
Welwood, James ..

278

John, patriarch ... 404
+Wentworth, Thomas ...279

Joseph ..

406
Thom, lawyer 294 +

Richard

414
*Wepfer, John Janies. 295

Robert.

415
*Werenfels, Sam..

. ib.

sir Thomas .. 416
+ Wesley, Sam..

296

Thom, of Sion coll. 420
t-
Sam. jun..

298 + --- Thomas, Albius ... 492

299 *Whitefield. George.. 428
Charles.
310 *Whitehead, David.

433
*Wesselus, John.

311

George 434
+ West, Gilbert.

..313

John

437
James
315 t-

Paul.

438
Richard
316 +

William. 445
Thomas

317 +Whitehurst, John.. 458
Westfield, Thomas

318 Whitelocke, James . 463
*Weston, Eliz. Jane .......319 ti --- Bulstrode
Stephen..

ib.

John...

... 465

END OF THE THIRTY-FIRST VOLUME.

Printed by Nichols, Son, and Bentley,
Red Lion Passage, Fleet Street, London.

55 S80

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