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some persons in whom he could confide to the king at Oxford, to inform his majesty of the posture of his affairs in Ireland, and to know his pleasure in relation to those particulars of the treaty which remained to be adjusted, fixed upon lord Edward Brabazon, sir Henry Tichborne, and sir James Ware, as persons acceptable to the king, and not inclined to favour either the popish or parliamentary interest. They arrived at Oxford in the end of 1644, and, while here, such time as sir James could spare from the business on which he was sent, was employed by him in the libraries, or in the company of the men of learning. The uviversity complimented him with the bonorary degree of doctor of laws.

While these commissioners were returning to Ireland, they were taken by one of the parliament ships, and sir James, finding there were no hopes of escaping, threw overboard his majesty's dispatches to the marquis of Ormond. He and his companions were then brought to Lon- ! don and imprisoned ten months in the Tower, but were at last released, in exchange for some persons imprisoned in Dublin, for an attempt to betray the town of Drogheda to the Scotch covenanters. During bis tedious imprisonment, sir James amused bimself by writing “An imaginary voyage to an Utopian island,” which was never published, but the MS. remained for many years in the family. When discharged he returned to Dublin, and had an order from the lord-lieutenant and council on the treasury for 7181. for the expences of his journey. As the king's affairs now became desperate in both kingdoms, he sent instructions to the marquis of Ormond to make peace with the Irish catholics “ whatever it cost, so that bis protestant subjects there may be secured, and his regal anthority preserved." In what manner this was to be effected belongs to the history of the times. It was on the part of Charles an unfortunate measure, but it was thought a necessary one. Peace was accordingly concluded with the catholics by the earl of Glamorgan, whose conduct in the affair has been well illustrated by Dr. Birch in his “ Inquiry into the share. king Charles I. had in the Transactions of the earl of Glamorgan," Lond. 1747 and 1756, 8vo. In the mean time Glamorgan being thought to bave exceeded his commission, secretary Digby then in Ireland, accused him at the council-table, Dec. 26, 1645, of suspicion of treason. He was then arrested, and sir James, the earl of Roscommon,

and lord Lambert, were appointed a committee to inquire into bis conduct, and take his examination, which in Janu. ary following was transmitted to the king.

During the remainder of the troubles, sir James remained firm to the king's interest, and zealously adhered to the marquis of Ormond, who ever after entertained a great affection for him. He continued, in Dublin, till the marquis, by the king's orders, surrendered that place to the parliamentary power in June 1647. At this time sir James Ware was considered as a man of such consequence, that the parliament insisted on his being one of the hostages for the performance of the treaty; and accordingly he repaired, with the earl of Roscommon), and col. Arthur Chichester, to the committee for the management of Irish affairs at Derby-house, London; but as soon as the treaty was concluded, and the liostages permitted to depart, he returned to Dublin, and lived for some time in a private station, being deprived of his employment of auditor-general. He was, however, disturbed in this retirement by Michael Jones, the governor of Dublin, who, jealous of his character and consequence, sent him a peremptory order to depart the city, and transport himself beyond seas into what country he pleased, except England. Having chosen France for the place of his exile, Jones furnished hiin with a pass for himself, bis eldest son, and one servant, signed April 4, 1649. He landed at St. Malo's, whence he removed not long after to Caen in Normandy, and then 10 Paris, and contracted an acquaintance there with some of the literati, and particularly with Bochart, whose works he much esteemed, and thought bis “ Hierozoicon” a suitable present for the library of the university of Dublin. After continuing in France about two years, he left it in 1651, and by licence from the parliament came to London on private business, and two years after went to Ireland to look after his estates.

Having now leisure to prosecute his favourite studies, the return to which was now consoling as well as gratifying, he took several journeys to London to publish them, the art of printing being at that time in a very low condition in Ireland. In May 1654 he published the first edition of his antiquities, under the title of “ De Hibernia et antiquitatibus ejus Disquisitiones,” Lood. 8vo, and a much enlarged and corrected edition in 1658. He also callected the works ascribed to St. Patrick, and published them, with

notes, under the title “ Opuscula Sancto Patricio, qui Hibernos ad fidem Cbristi convertit, adscripta, &c." Lond. 1656, 8vo.

On the restoration, he was, by special order from his majesty, replaced in his office of auditor-general, and a parliament being summoned in May 1661, he was unanimously elected representative of the university of Dublin. He was very instrumental in the parliamentary grant of 30,0001. to the marquis, now duke, of Ormond, who distinguished bim in a very particular manner. By his grace's interest, he was made one of the four commissioners of appeal in causes of the excise, and new impost raised by the statute of 14th and 15th Charles II. with a salary of 1501. He was also appointed one of the commissioners for the execution of the king's declaration for the settlement of the kingdom, and for the satisfaction of the several interests of adventurers, soldiers, and others, and was, by the king's instructions, made of the quorum in this commission, without whose presence and concurrence no act could be done in execution of the declaration. His majesty, in consideration of his faithful services for a great number of years, and perhaps not forgetting a handsome sum of money which he had sent him in his exile, was graciously pleased to offer to create him a viscount of the kingdom of Ireland, but this he refused, and likewise a baronetcy. At his request, however, the king granted him two blank baronet's patents, which be filled up and disposed of to two friends, whose posterity, Harris says, “to this day enjoy the honours," but he does not mention their names,

Returning again to his studies, he began with some pieces of the venerable Bede, published under the title of “ Venerabilis Bedæ epistolæ duæ, necnon vitæ abbatum Wiremutbensium et Gerwiensium, &c.” Dublin, 1664. The same year he published the Annals of Ireland for four reigns, “ Rerum Hibernicarum Annales regnantibus Henrico VII. Henrico VIII. Edwardo VI. et Maria, &c.” ibid. 1664, fol.; and the year following his history of the bishops of Ireland, entitled “ De Præsulibus Hiberniæ Commentarius, &c." ibid. 1665, fol. He was preparing orber matters respecting Ireland, but was prevented by his death which took place Dec. 1, 1666, in the seventy-third year of his age. He was buried in the church of St. Werburg, in the city of Dublin, in a vault belonging to his family.

As an antiquary, sir Jamies Ware must ever be held in

titled

Dollowing his histofaria, &c.” ibid.

and lord Lambert, were appointed a committee to inquire into bis conduct, and take his examination, which in Janu. ary following was transmitted to the king.

During the remainder of the troubles, sir James remained firm to the king's interest, and zealously adhered to the marquis of Ormond, who ever after entertained a great affection for him. He continued, in Dublin, till the marquis, by the king's orders, surrendered that place to the parliamentary power in June 1647. At this time sir James Ware was considered as a man of such consequence, that the parliament insisted on his being one of the hostages for the performance of the treaty; and accordingly he repaired, with the earl of Roscommon), and col. Arthur Chichester, to the committee for the management of Irish affairs at Derby-house, London ; but as soon as the treaty was concluded, and the liostages permitted to depart, he returned to Dublin, and lived for some time in a private station, being deprived of his employment of auditor-general. He was, however, disturbed in this retirement by Michael Jones, the governor of Dublin, who, jealous of his character and consequence, sent him a peremptory order to depart the city, and transport himself beyond seas into what country be pleased, except England. Having chosen France for the place of his exile, Jones furnished bin with a pass for himself, bis eldest son, and one servant, signed April 4, 1649. He landed at St. Malo's, whence he removed not long after to Caen in Normandy, and then 10 Paris, and contracted an acquaintance there with some of the literati, and particularly with Bochart, whose works he much esteemed, and thought his “ Hierozoicon” a suitable present for the library of the university of Dublin. After continuing in France about two years, he left it in 1651, and, by licence from the parliament caine to London on private business, and two years after went to Ireland to look after his estates.

Having now leisure to prosecute bis favourite studies, the return to wbich was now consoling as well as gratifying, he took several journeys to London to publish them, the art of printing being at that time in a very low condition in Ireland. In May 1654 he published the first edition of his antiquities, under the title of “ De Hibernia et antiquitatibus ejus Disquisitiones,” Lood. 8vo, and a much enlarged and corrected edition in 1658. He also collected the works ascribed to St. Patrick, and published them, with

notes, under the title “ Opuscula Sancto Patricio, qui Hibernos ad fidem Christi convertit, adscripta, &c." Lond. 1656, 8vo.

On the restoration, he was, by special order from his majesty, replaced in his office of auditor-general, and a parliament being summoned in May 1661, he was unanimously elected representative of the university of Dublin. He was very instrumental in the parliamentary grant of 30,000l. to the marquis, now duke, of Ormond, who distinguished bim in a very particular manner. By his grace's interest, he was made one of the four commissioners of appeal in causes of the excise, and new impost raised by the statute of 14th and 15th Charles II. with a salary of 1501. He was also appointed one of the commissioners for the execution of the king's declaration for the settlement of the kingdom, and for the satisfaction of the several interests of adventurers, soldiers, and others, and was, by the king's instructions, made of the quorum in this commission, without whose presence and concurrence no act could be done in execution of the declaration. His majesty, in consideration of his faithful services for a great number of years, and perhaps not forgetting a handsome sum of money wbich he had sent him in his exile, was graciously pleased to offer to create him a viscount of the kingdom of Ireland, but this he refused, and likewise a baronetcy. At his request, however, the king granted him two blank baronet's patents, which be filled up and disposed of to two friends, whose posterity, Harris says, "to this day enjoy the honours,” but he does not mention their names,

Returning again to his studies, he began with some pieces of the venerable Bede, published under the title of “ Venerabilis Bedæ epistolæ duæ, necuon vitæ abbatum Wiremut bensium et Gerwiensium, &c." Dublin, 1664. The same year he published the Annals of Ireland for four reigns, “ Rerum Hibernicarum Annales regnantibus Henrico VII. Henrico VIII. Edwardo VI. et Maria, &c." ibid. 1664, fol.; and the year following his history of the bishops of Ireland, entitled “De Præsulibus Hiberniæ Commentarius, &c.” ibid. 1665, fol. He was preparing other matters respecting Ireland, but was prevented by his death which took place Dec. 1, 1666, in the seventy-third year of his age. He was buried in the church of St. Werburg, in the city of Dublin, in a vault belonging to his family.

As an antiquary, sir James Ware must ever be held in

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