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REPORT No. 1027

PRICE SUPPORT FOR TUNG NUTS AND HONEY

JULY 12, 1949.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

State of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. COOLEY, from the Committee on Agriculture, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 29)

The Committee on Agriculture, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 29) to amend the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended, to provide parity for tung nuts, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

The amendment is as follows:

Page 1, line 3, strike out everything after the enacting clause and substitute in lieu thereof the following:

That, notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary of Agriculture, through the Commodity Credit Corporation and other means available to him, is authorized and directed through loans, purchases, or other operations to support the price of honey, and of tung nuts produced on the acreage of tung-nut trees planted prior to the date of the enactment of this Act, at not less than 60 nor more than 90 per centum of the parity price as calculated pursuant to section 301 (a) of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended by the Agricultural Act of 1949. Appropriate adjustments may be made in the support price of honey or tung nuts for differences in grade, type, quality, location, and other factors.

In carrying out the provisions of this Act, compliance by the producer with production goals and marketing practices (including appropriate marketing agree ments and orders under the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937), as prescribed by the Secretary, may be required as a condition of eligibility for price support.

Amend the title to read as follows:
A bill to provide price support for tung nuts and honey, and for other purposes.

STATEMENT

The purpose of this bill is to provide a price-support program for two highly specialized agricultural commodities, both of which are of great importance to the national welfare. The two commodities are

PRICE SUPPORT FOR TUNG NUTS AND HONEY

JULY 12, 1949.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

State of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. COOLEY, from the Committee on Agriculture, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 29)

The Committee on Agriculture, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 29) to amend the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended, to provide parity for tung nuts, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

The amendment is as follows:

Page 1, line 3, strike out everything after the enacting clause and substitute in lieu thereof the following:

That, notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary of Agriculture, through the Commodity Credit Corporation and other means available to him, is authorized and directed through loans, purchases, or other operations to support the price of honey, and of tung nuts produced on the acreage of tung-nut trees planted prior to the date of the enactment of this Act, at not less than 60 nor more than 90 per centum of the parity price as calculated pursuant to section 301 (a) of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended by the Agricultural Act of 1919. Appropriate adjustments may be made in the support price of honey or tung nuts for differences in grade, type, quality, location, and other factors.

In carrying out the provisions of this Act, compliance by the producer with production goals and marketing practices (including appropriate marketing agreements and orders under the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937), as prescribed by the Secretary, may be required as a condition of eligibility for price support.

Amend the title to read as follows:
A bill to provide price support for tung nuts and honey, and for other purposes.

STATEMENT

The purpose of this bill is to provide a price-support program for two highly specialized agricultural commodities, both of which are of great importance to the national welfare. The two commodities are

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