The Concept of Consciousness

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Cosimo, Inc., Nov 1, 2005 - Philosophy - 364 pages
The present volume does not aim to be a system. It does profess not to forget the initial quest of philosophy.Its scope is limited, for it proposed only to give a consistent account, a definition, of one very common yet perplexing feature of the universe - consciousness" -from The Preface By 1914, when he completed The Concept of Consciousness, Holt believed that objects are as initially perceived, that one could relate conscious experience to physical references and that environment is the determining force in life. Contents of this volume include: .The Renaissance of Logic .Objections to the Programme of Logic .Correspondence: The Particular and The Universal .Further Implications of the Programme of Logic .Our Universe at Large .The Substance of Ideas .The Substance of Matter .The Neutral Mosaic .The Concept of Consciousness EDWIN B. HOLT, (1873-1946) born in Winchester, Massachusetts, was an undergraduate at Amherst College, but transferred to Harvard, receiving his A.B. in 1896. Thereafter, he studied with William James, receiving a doctorate in psychology in 1901. Holt taught at Harvard until 1918, and later served for nearly a decade as a Visiting Professor of Psychology at Princeton, where he was widely acclaimed for his brilliant lectures.
 

Contents

CONTENTS
13
CHAPTER II
19
CHAPTER III
37
CHAPTER IV
53
CHAPTER V
77
CHAPTER VI
91
CHAPTER VII
115
CHAPTER VIII
135
THE EMPIRICAL PROPERTIES OF CONSCIOUSNESS
185
CHAPTER XI
208
CHAPTER XII
223
CHAPTER XIII
259
CHAPTER XIV
282
CHAPTER XV
305
INDEX
341
Copyright

CHAPTER IX
166

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