Advances in Molecular Toxicology

Front Cover
Elsevier, Mar 10, 2008 - Medical - 275 pages
Advances in Molecular Toxicology features the latest advances in all of the subspecialties of the broad area of molecular toxicology. Toxicology is the study of poisons and this series details the study of the molecular basis by which a vast array of agents encountered in the human environment and produced by the human body itself manifest themselves as toxins. Not strictly limited to documenting these examples the series is also concerned with the complex web of chemical and biological events that give rise to toxin-induced symptoms and disease. The new technologies that are being harnessed to analyze and understand these events will also be reviewed by leading workers in the field.
Advances in Molecular Toxicology will report progress in all aspects of these rapidly evolving molecular aspects of toxicology with a view toward detailed elucidation of both progress on the molecular level and on advances in technological approaches employed

* Cutting edge reviews by leading workers in the discipline.
* In depth dissection of molecular aspects of interest to a broad range of scientists, physisicans and any student in the allied disciplines.
* Leading edge applications of technological innovations in the chemistry, biochemistry and molecular medicine.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter 1 Genotoxicity of Chromate
1
Learning from Recent Cases of Drug Attrition
25
Chapter 3 GlucuronidationDependent Toxicity and Bioactivation
57
Chapter 4 Allergic Contact Dermatitis A Common Skin Disease Caused by Allergic Reactions to Chemicals in Our Environment
87
Chapter 5 Inorganic Molecular Toxicology and Chelation Therapy of Heavy Metals and Metalloids
123
Chapter 6 Pyrimidine Damage and Repair
153
Chapter 7 Formation Persistence and Significance of DNA Adduct Formation in Relation to Some Pollutants from a Broad Perspective
183
Subject Index
241
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 114 - Bonecchi R, Bianchi G, Bordignon PP, D'Ambrosio D, Lang R, Borsatti A, Sozzani S, Allavena P, Gray PA, Mantovani A, Sinigaglia F: Differential expression of chemokine receptors and chemotactic responsiveness of type 1 T helper cells (This) and Th2s.
Page 149 - Molecular mimicry in virus infection: Crossreaction of measles virus phosphoprotein or of herpes simplex virus protein with human intermediate filaments. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.
Page 117 - Are free radicals and not quinones the haptenic species derived from urushiols and other contact allergenic mono- and dihydric alkylbenzenes? The significance of NADH, glutathione, and redox cycling in the skin. Arch Dermatol Res 1990; 282:56-64.
Page 120 - Schuler, G. (1996) Generation of mature dendritic cells from human blood: an improved method with special regard to clinical applicability. J. Immunol. Methods 196, 137-151.
Page 79 - Acyl glucuronides revisited: is the glucuronidation process a toxification as well as a detoxification mechanism?, Drug Metab.
Page 20 - H2O2 generation in perfused rat liver and the reaction of catalase compound I and hydrogen donors. Arch. Biochem. Biophys.
Page 84 - WHO cooperative trial on primary prevention of ischaemic heart disease using clofibrate to lower serum cholesterol: mortality follow-up.
Page 53 - Studies on the metabolism of troglitazone to reactive intermediates in vitro and in vivo. Evidence for novel biotransformation pathways involving quinone methide formation and thiazolidinedione ring scission. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 14, 62-70. Kennett, DJ, and Winterhalder, B. (2006). "Behavioral Ecology and the Transition to Agriculture.
Page 227 - Variation in DNA repair is a factor in cancer susceptibility: a paradigm for the promises and perils of individual and population risk estimation?
Page 114 - Cher, DJ, and Mosmann, TR (1987) Two types of murine helper T cell clone. II. Delayed-type hypersensitivity is mediated by TH1 clones. J. Immunol.

About the author (2008)

Dr. James Fishbein works at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland.

Bibliographic information