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Mr. WHITTEN. Would you also provide for the record a detailed description of the construction history of each of these facilities? In terms of funding, this chart should show not only the amounts appropriated to date, but any known or anticipated future requirements.

[The information follows:]

Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center. -Operates from facilities at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, Maryland. The Center's programs have been accommodated at Beltsville over the years without any special construction. We anticipate a need for improving the animal room facilities of this Center during fiscal year 1981. A feasibility study is being conducted to determine how best to do this job and to estimate costs for various options.

Consumer Nutrition Center.-Operates from facilities leased by GSA at Hyattsville, Maryland, and one laboratory at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, Maryland. The Center will continue operating from these facilities and we do not anticipate any major construction requirements in this area.

Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center.—Construction of an addition contiguous to the present facility is underway and on schedule. The four floor addition is expected to be completed late in 1981. Due primarily to increased inflation levels additional funds must be added as shown below to complete the facility. Construction history for this facility is as follows: 1970 Original building was completed 1975 $225,000 appropriated for planning an addition of 55,000 square feet to the

facility 1976 $3.5 million appropriated for construction of addition 1980 $522,000 of Agency funds were added to construction funds for the addition 1981 $550,000 of Agency funds to be added for a minimum fourth level 1982 or later years $2.1 million needed to complete the shelled floors and to provide

adequate instrumentation.

Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University.-Construction is underway and on schedule. The 15 floor facility with 208,000 square feet is expected to be completed the Fall of 1982 except for the 3 floors which will only be shelled. Due principally to increased inflation levels, additional funds as shown below are needed to complete the facility. Construction history for this facility is as follows: 1978 $2.0 million appropriated for planning 1979 $21.1 million appropriated for construction 1980 $2.2 million of Agency funds were added to construction funds for the building 1982 $7.7 million needed to complete these shelled floors of the facility.

Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine. —The projected full program will require a new facility devoted exclusively to research. Temporary space is now being leased in a commercial building not designed for research purposes. Important considerations in determining the facility needs in Houston are: A facility feasibility study is being completed. $6.6 million planning funds would be needed if appropriated in fiscal year 1983. $66 million for construction needed in fiscal year 1985. As an alternative to federal construction, the Texas Medical Center is interested in

constructing a facility and leasing it to the Federal Government. $7-12 million additional funds would be needed to fund the full anticipated program

in a new facility.

Western Human Nutrition Research Center.-About 20,000 square feet of space was made available to USDA at the Letterman Army Institute of Research (LAIR). This space is being modified for use as laboratories and a metabolic unit. Any program expansion beyond the present authorized staff would require additional facilities. No additional space is available to us at LAIR. Full staffing of 40 scientists and support staff would require an additional 55,000 square feet of space and a total of $8,000,000 of continuing research program funds.

RESEARCH CENTERS FUNDS AND PERSONNEL Mr. WHITTEN. Would you please provide for the record a table showing the current funds and personnel assigned to each of these locations, as well as the total amount of funds and personnel required once each of these six centers become fuliy operational? (The information follows:]

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Human Nutrition Fund and Staffing Requirements

(FY 1981 Dollars)

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HUMAN NUTRITION PERSONNEL Mr. WHITTEN. What discussions have you had with the Office of the Secretary and with OMB with respect to acquiring additional personnel ceilings in support of the human nutrition laboratories?

Dr. BERTRAND. SEA has submitted their personnel needs to OMB. However, due to the constraints on federal employment levels we have not been successful in acquiring additional personnel ceilings for the nutrition laboratories.

WEEDS IN COTTON Mr. WHITTEN. Bermudagrass, johnsongrass and other weeds and grasses greatly increase the cost of cotton production. Furthermore, they greatly interfere with reduced tillage and no-till production. What is your current research program in this area?

Dr. BERTRAND. At Stoneville, Mississippi, where we have most of our research on these particular weeds, we are currently devoting a quarter of a scientist per year and about $20,000 on research to develop systems for the control of bermudagrass, johnsongrass, and other weeds and grasses. The development of the rope wick applicator has helped to reduce crop losses by controlling johnsongrass.

Mr. WHITTEN. What is included in the fiscal year 1982 budget for this work?

Dr. BERTRAND. There are no additional funds in the fiscal year 1982 budget for research to develop systems for control of bermudagrass, johnsongrass, and other weeds and grasses in cotton.

Mr. WHITTEN. Do you have any estimates of the potential savings that might result from this work?

Dr. BERTRAND. At our current level of reseach on these weeds in cotton, progress in developing improved control technology will be slow and it will take many years to achieve significant savings. Under an expanded program we could develop improved weed control technology for perennial weeds in cotton such as bermudagrass, nutsedge, spurred anoda, and johnsongrass. This technology would reduce yield losses, improve cotton yields and quality, and reduce weed control costs providing a savings of at least $120 million per year.

ENERGY RESEARCH CENTERS Mr. WHITTEN. What is the current status of the energy research centers?

Dr. BERTRAND. Funding for two agricultural energy centers was appropriated to the Science and Education Administration in fiscal year 1980. These centers were established at Tifton, Georgia, and Peoria, Illinois. The Southern Agricultural Energy Center is primarily concerned with on-farm energy production and use; the Northern Agricultural Energy Center is concerned with the selection, screening, and evaluation of energy crops and their conversion to alcohols and petrochemical substitutes. The centers assist with the coordination of energy programs among Science and Education Administration units in that Agricultural Research, Cooperative Research, and Extension personnel are located at the centers. They manage research on alternative energy sources at Agricultural Research satellite locations, conduct the peer review process and

monitor extramural grants, and conduct energy technology transfer programs. They also manage agricultural energy programs funded by the Department of Energy and coordinate these programs with those funded by the Science and Education Administration.

Mr. WHITTEN. Please provide for the record a detailed description of the activities being carried out at each energy center, the budget for the center and the plans for fiscal year 1982.

Dr. BERTRAND. A description of the activities being carried out in fiscal year 1981 will be provided for the record. Detailed plans for fiscal year 1982 have not been completed, but in the main they should be a continuation of fiscal year 1981 activities. No funding increase for the centers is requested in the fiscal year 1982 Science and Education Administration budget. The expected loss of passthrough funding from the Department of Energy in fiscal year 1982 will result in substantial program reductions, particularly for extramural projects.

[The information follows:]

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