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LABORATORY SPACE

Mr. WHITTEN. What laboratory space have you acquired during the past 12 months, and how is that space used?

Dr. BERTRAND. We will provide for the record a list of the laboratory space which was acquired during the past year and how it was used. [The information follows:] Laboratory space acquired in fiscal year 1980

Square feet Location and type of research:

Denver, Colo.-Arthropod research, animals .......
Poteau, Okla.-Tick research, animals ............

2,160

520

olal.......

Total ....

2,680 Mr. WHITTEN. Have you released any laboratory space during the past 12 months, and if so, how was that space used?

Dr. BERTRAND. No, sir, we have not released any laboratory space in the last year.

FERTILIZER RESEARCH Mr. WHITTEN. Would you also provide for the record an update of your research program in fertilizer research and development and tell us how that relates to the work of the Tennessee Valley Authority, which is the lead agency in fertilizer research?

Dr. BERTRAND. The responsibility for fertilizer development and testing, including chemical formulation and the development of processes that might be used industrially for the manufacture of fertilizer materials, was transferred to the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1966. Since that time, SEA-AR has not engaged in this activity. However, we do maintain liaison and work closely with the Tennessee Valley Authority on research on fertilizer use efficiency.

The Science and Education Administration, Agricultural Research does maintain an active research program to develop improved methods for assessing and predicting the fertilizer needs of crops for maximum long-term production without environmental damage. Research is also being conducted to develop improved crop management practices for more efficient use of fertilizer, energy, and water resources; and to develop improved ways to manage fertilizers and naturally occurring nutrients for high yield and nutritional quality of crops.

AIRCRAFT

Mr. WHITTEN. Would you please update the record on aircraft owned by Agricultural Research and show where the aircraft are located, the type of aircraft, how the aircraft was acquired, and how the aircraft is used? Also include how many hours you have actually used each aircraft during fiscal year 1980.

[The information follows:)

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PORK HANDBOOK NO. 8 Mr. WHITTEN. Would you please discuss with the Committee how you used the funds that were provided for the updating of Pork Handbook No. 8, and what your plans are for fiscal years 1981 and 1982?

Dr. BERTRAND. The analytical portion of the research project on fresh pork was completed in September 1980. This included investigation of the effects of retail marketing and the changes in composition due to cooking. Data on physical quality characteristics of carcasses and on the yield of edible portions from various cuts were recorded. The macro-nutrients, 7 of the B vitamins, 8 inorganic elements, 14 fatty acids, and cholesterol were chemically determined in over 250 nationally representative samples of pork. The preliminary statistical evaluations of these data were completed in February, 1981. The final evaluation of these data will be completed and the results released for publication by early fiscal year 1982. Plans have begun for the cured pork study. The analytical portion of this study will begin in mid-1981. It is anticipated that this project will be completed by the end of fiscal year 1982.

ENERGY RETROFIT

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Mr. WHITTEN. You are requesting $3.5 million for retrofitting of existing AR facilities. Would you please describe exactly how you plan to use these funds?

Dr. BERTRAND. The $3.5 million requested in fiscal year 1982 would be used for the following program elements: for Design Services, to complete approximately 42 percent of the total energy surveys-$1,000,000; and for Purchase of Equipment and Construction, to complete approximately 14 percent of the design services completed through fiscal year 1981-$2,500,000. Design Services provides engineering designs to implement the findings of energy surveys. Energy surveys, the foundation of energy management, provide conclusions as to cost-savings obtainable by modifying particular elements of building structure, fixtures, operating procedures, or maintenance.

The program is in the third year of a 6-year energy retrofit plan. Through fiscal year 1982, an estimated 10 percent—700,000 square feet-of the retrofittable space will have been completed. Still remaining is approximately 7 million square feet to be subject to the retrofit program

Specific areas to be involved under this program in fiscal year 1982 are: replacement of energy inefficient and deteriorated windows and doors frames and sashes; replacement of inefficient lighting and electrical systems; installation of energy management systems; modification and alteration of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems and associated controls; upgrading central boiler systems and replacing deteriorating steam lines, coils and plumbing; heat recovery from exhaust systems; installation of ceiling insulation and ceiling ventilation fans; and installation curtains and blankets for heat retention in greenhouses.

CONTINGENCY RESEARCH FUND

Mr. WHITTEN. For the record, please provide each project and each activity to which resources were diverted from the Contingency Research Fund during the calendar year 1980. [The information follows:]

Projects funded from contingency research fund, calendar year 1980–project and

activity Amount Animal production efficiency research: Purchase of small animal cages to meet Federal requirements $35,000 Initiate tick research in Puerto Rico................................................ - 30,000 Steamlines/Fargo, N. Dak.......................................................................... 18,000 Emergency f purchase as a result of severe range drought in eastern Montana....................................................................................... 126,500 Importation of sheep from Canada to the United States under a memorandum of understanding between Canada and the USDA relative to evaluation of breeds of livestock both exotic and domestic....~~~~~ 50,000 Energy saving perchloric acid fume hood................................................ 24,000 Crop production efficiency research: Replacement of equipment and erection of temporary greenhouses estroyed by fire at Stillwater, Okla..................................................... 36,000 Inhibition of chitin synthesis in insects....................................... - 80,000 Emergency identification of exotic mite pests on honey bees 19,000 Repair hail-damaged roof at the Crops Laboratory in Fort Collins, §. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1,000 Replacement of bee research equipment and supplies lost in flooding at Baton Rouge, La............................................................................ 10,000 Reactivate fermentation recovery phase of research program by replacement of explosion-prone centrifuge......................................... 8,000 Partial cost of peptic synthesizer for preparing analogs of insects brain hormones. 15,000 Genetic analysis of heliothis mitochondrial, DNA................................. 48,500 Processing, storage, distribution efficiency research: Emergency repairs to the refrigerated storage facility at WRRC, Albany, Calif..... 53,000 Research on trypsin inhibitors on soybean and other vegetable products..... 116,000 Research to improve human health and safety: Treating food waste by fermentation process to destroy harmful organisms 65,000 Origin of Clostridium botulinum spores in honey.................................. 20,000 Specialty chemicals for fire ant control................................................... 45,000 Research on conservation and watershed: Laboratory and headhouse/greenhouse equipment at Watkinsville, Ga.....~... 100,000 Automated system for rearing Mediterranean Fruit Fly..................... 100,000 Total, 1980 obligations, contingency research fund............................ $1,000,000

GUAYULE AND JOJOBA

Mr. WHITTEN. Would you please bring the Committee up to date on what is being done in the area of guayule research and what your plans are for fiscal year 1982?

Dr. BERTRAND. We are determining soil water regimes and irrigation practices needed to establish stands and maximize rubber and/ or resin production per unit of water consumed. We are quantitatively determining the water consumed in establishing seedlings, developing stands and producing high yields of rubber under different climatic regions. These data are very important to potential growers as water costs will be a major component of production costs and these data are needed to assist in predicting yield levels for siting processing plants. We will be obtaining quantitative data on salt tolerance and interactive effects of salt stress on rubber production since water quality will be a major factor that must be considered. We are continuing our studies on use of bioregulators to stimulate yield and quality of rubber and the effects of bioregulators on disease resistance and plant tolerance to cold and salinity. Our laboratory at Peoria, Illinois, is developing a standard analytical technique for measuring quantity and quality of rubber in plants and will be exploring new processing techniques. We will be developing guayule cropping system technology since farmers do not have experience growing guayule as they have with most other crops. Most of the guayule rubber produced in the past has been from native stands. SEA has initiated a seed increase program to develop foundation seed for increase by seed growers at the appropriate timing for planting large-scale commercial acreages. The Department of Energy provided $350,000 of pass-through funds in fiscal 1981 for the seed increase program. The research of SEA-AR and SEA-CR is fully coordinated with projects conducted by the Department of Commerce, the National Science Foundation grants, and with Mexico's scientists. Since our programs are just getting underway, they will not change significantly in fiscal year 1982.

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Mr. WHITTEN. Would you please discuss the current situation with respect to jojoba research and what your plans are for fiscal year 1982?

Dr. BERTRAND. We terminated our research on jojoba in 1979. A variety of commercialization activities have progressed to the point where no further utilization research is necessary in our laboratories. We still respond to inquiries and are still assisting in technology transfer under our new crops program. We have no plans for jojoba research in fiscal 1982.

NATICK LAB

Mr. WHITTEN. Last year you were negotiating with the Department of the Army for research on irradiated foods at the Natick Laboratory. What was the outcome of these negotiations? What are the plans for work at the Natick Laboratory during fiscal year 1982 and what will be the role of AR2

Dr. BERTRAND. The responsibility for all future radiation research on foods has been transferred to the Department of Agriculture. Research to meet Defense Department needs will be carried out by USDA under reimbursable agreements. The transfer is in its final stages.

We have no plans for work on irradiated foods at Natick in fiscal year 1982. We expect work on low dose, low nitrite bacon to be completed in fiscal year 1982 in SEA-AR laboratories. We expect the research to establish whether radiation treatment can be used to eliminate nitrite from bacon.

EMPLOYMENT

Mr. WHITTEN. For fiscal years 1980, 1981, and 1982, provide for the record a table which shows line-type people versus administrative or supervisory people.

[The information follows:]

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