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Rochester German Ins. Co.

ROCHESTER, N. Y.

January 1st, 1904.

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Net

Net
Net

Losses
YEAR Assets
Premiums

Net
YEAR Assets
Paid

Losses
Surplus

Premiums
Received

Paid 1872 $120,425 $19,225 $21,847 $1,560 1888

$712,826 $209 060 $364,226 $216,344 1873. 165,352 27,657 73.744 15,944 1889

751,385 218,520 389,961 225.400 1874. 314,331 33.248 153,161 57,197 1890

815,396 238,838 438 713

226,047 1875. 344,498 47,407 176,862 102 960 1891

894,534 280 864 433,677 220,245 1876. 367,184 57,066 204.655 119,173 1892

962,137 240,829 570,673 326,396 1877. 369,103 70,856 171,971 108,991 1893.

915,899 212,173 520,240 378,086 1878. 409,620 115,547 161,146 73.892 1894

858,561 282,504 398, 742 310,914 1879. 437,265 120,072 207,352 110.278 1895

911,783 383,555 382 350 190 205 1880 468,983 123,509 235,551 133,227

1896

952,879 461,043 359,745 158,594 1881. 493,785 135 445 261.995 170,356 1897

1,026,505 485,162 307,673 127,993 1882 504,512 124,097 281,588 184,335 1898.

1.095,023 566,706 304,886 145,778 575 028 135 319 826,624 162,327 1899.

1,154,457 563,861 368,944 183,091 1884 637,143 127.564 451,172 243,143 1900.

1,205,710 571,921 466,307 238,373 649,936 141,131 439,655 289,392 1901

1,289,983 521,595 599,548 323,537 658,481 172.625 360,085 239,649 1902.

1,461,994
491,091

886,481 424,851 1887 672,144 164,195 378,983 245,316 1903.

1,605,688 572,594 998,874 425, 905 Hon. FRED'K COOK, Pr-sident,

EUGENE SATTERLEE, Vice President.
ALBRECHT VOGT 2d Vice-President, H. F. ATWOOD, Secretary.
J. FLETCHER CAMP, Assistant Secretary

H R. MUTSCHLER, Assistant Secretary:
EDWIN G. SEIBELS, Manager Southern Department. Thos. J. Conroy, Manager Pacific Coast Department.

CHARLES G. MILLER, Special Agent. J. F. Burnside, Special Agent. Joseph L. BIERBRAUER, Special Agent. F. L. WEINECK, Special Agent.

1883 1885 1886

INSURANCE A Practical Exposition for the Student and Business Man.

BY T. E. YOUNG, B.A., F.R.A.S.

The author of "Insurance,” which is destined to become the standard treatise, is the distinguished actuary, T. E. Young, B.A., F.R.A.S., who is an ex-president of the Institute of Actuaries, ex-chairman of the Life Offices Association, and a member of the Actuarial Societies of Belgium, France and America. Many books treating of different phases of insurance have been published during recent years, but certainly no work of this character, by an authority so well known and so eminent in his profession.

Mr. Young's book affords the necessary material for a complete insurance education, and presents the various phases of insurance in a masterly and intelligible manner. In brief, it is a lucid, simple exposition of the principles and practice of life, fire, marine and other branches of insurance, especially adapted for the use of the underwriter, the student and the business man. It is a book of 340 pages, neatly bound in cloth. Price, $2.50, postpaid.

Insurance Office Organisation, Manage

ment and Accounts.

BY T. E. YOUNG, B.A., F.R.A.S., and RICHARD MASTERS, A.C.A.

The above-named new book will be found to be a valuable guide to the proper organization and conduct of an insurance company. In it Mr. Young points out the best methods to be followed in the formation and management of an insurance company's staff, and the most systematic and economical administration of its business. The arrangement of work, selection and training of employees, and many other practical features relating to the operation of a company are comprehensively discussed.

The general principles of bookkeeping are also treated by Mr. Young, and are elaborated in succeed. ing chapters by Mr. Masters. The general, life, fire, marine and accident departments are taken up separately, and the necessary books and accounts illustrated and described in detail.

This work should be invaluable to anyone contemplating the establishment of a new insurance company, or who wishes to improve present bookkeeping methods. It contains 146 pages, and is bound in cloth. Price, $1.50, postpaid.

Address THE SPECTATOR COMPANY, 95 William Street, New York,

Sole Selling Agents for the Insurance World.

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GEORGE L. CHASE, President CHAS. E. CHASE, Vice-President P. C. BOYCE, Secretary R. M. BISSELL, Vice-President

THOS. TURNBULL, Assistant Secretary

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Of Boston, Ma66.

GOOD CONTRACTS TO RELIABLE
AGENTS. ADDRESS THE COMPANY

HENRY D. LYXAN, President
W. S. JOHNSTON,

Vice-Pres'ts
DAVID B. SICKELS,

Home Office Building, New York
NEW YORK TRUSTEES:
Wm. A. Wheelock

C. H. Ludington
C. N. Bliss

John Sloane Chauncey M. Depew

Gen, W. Rogers Elihu Root

Frank R, Lawrence E. F. Browning

R. A. C, Smith Geo. F. Vietor

Warner Van Norden James A. Hayden

W. H. Baldwin, Jr. James Stillman

James H. Hyde Walter S. Johnston

Wm. H. McIntyre George S. Edgell

Morton F. Plant Andrew Mills

Valentine P. Snyder Austin Lathrop

Grant B. Schley W. A. Nash

Stuyvesant Fish Henry D. Lyman

Richard Delafield Henry H. Cook

James B. Duke Wm. Nelson Cromwell

Charles M. Dow George J. Gould

Albert E, Lamb John J. McCook

M. F. Loughman
Thomas F. Ryan

Charles A. Conant
Alvin W. Krech

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STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS.

SYNOPSIS OF THE STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS OF THE

VARIOUS STATES AND TERRITORIES.

In the following pages will be found concise statements of the statutory requirements for the admission of life and miscellaneous insurance companies to do business in the respective States. In this brief form, the synopses are intended more as a hint than an actual guide, for it is not anticipated that any company in entering a State would be satisfied with anything less than the statutes themselves as their reliance as to conditions. Our summary, however, may be accepted as correct as far as it goes.

It has been our aim in preparing these synopses of the statutes to secure uniformity for all the States and to give the essential requirements in as brief a space as possible consistent with the statement of the facts. The synopsis for each State was sent to the supervising officer of such State and returned to us with his approval to date, or with such corrections as he deemed essential. We believe that the information given in this condensed form is as correct as it is possible to make it and will be sufficient to indicate to all interested the statutory requirements of the different States and Territories. Following the requirements are some notes culled from the statutes which will be of interest to life underwriters.

ALABAMA. SUPERVISING OFFICER, J. THOS. HEFLIN, SECRETARY OF STATE, Ex-OFFICIO

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER, MONTGOMERY. Preliminary Documents.-Copy of charter must be filed with Insurance Commissioner; also copy of annual statement showing condition of the company December 31 preceding. Must furnish a sworn certificate that it has at least $100,000 in approved securities on deposit with the proper officer of some State for the protection of all its policyholders.

Attorney.—The Insurance Commissioner must be appointed attorney to accept service of legal process.

Valuation of Policies.- Valuation to be made upon the Actuaries' or American Experience Tables, with interest at four per cent.

Annual Statements.- Must be filed on or before March 1, showing condition of the company December 31 preceding.

Agents.-Agents must procure certificates from Insurance Commissioner to be renewed annually in January. Any person soliciting or otherwise transacting the business of insurance is held to be an agent of the company, not of the assured.

Examinations. The Commissioner is required to examine domestic companies once in two years, or upon the request of five or more stockholders. He may also examine other companies whenever he deems it prudent, or, if he has occasion to believe they

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