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P R E F A C E.

TO

create in the British youth a laudable am

bition to excel in such pursuits as most conduce to their own honour and happiness, and the profperity of their native country, was one principal motive to this undertaking.

Curiosity is natural to the soul of man. We are inquisitive, and wonderfully solicitous to be informed of every thing, and every man's concerns, even to a fault; and thall we be less inquisitive, less solicitous, in the pursuit of useful knowledge, and the most important truths ?

Can there be a rational creature unconcerned to know the state of the world about him, and the manners, customs, and history, of the several nations his cotemporaries? And does it not add infinitely to the fatisfaction of every man that reads, to know the time when, and the place where, great and memorable actions were performed ?

But the labour and difficulty that is usually apprehended in making these inquiries, frightens young gentlemen from attempting to inform themfelves in these particulars ; though without a general knowledge of them, they are neither capable of ferving their country, nor qualified for converlation.

This tract, therefore, presents the youth of Great Britain with the world in miniature; which, it is prefumed, will be found to contain the most exact chronology, and the most perfect fyftem of geography now extant, with such an epitome of Ma

dera

dern History, or the present fate of all nations, as will render the work agreeable to every taste.

It is a very just observation, That a writer must not expect many readers, who does not accommodate himself to the taste of those gentlemen to whom he addresses his work.

And we need not be at a loss to know what is agreeable to most people, when we find every gentleman, and almost every lady, inquiring into the history of the day, and reading the most trifling occurrences, which nothing but the novelty can recommend.

These they are not afraid to venture upon, when contained in a handsome volume; while a folio of any dimensions, replenished with the most interesting truths, would lye neglected, under an apprehension that it was impoflible to go through it, or to retain in their memories what it contained, if they should attempt it.

This work, therefore, has the charms of brevity, as well as novelty, to engage a general attention. An hour's reading will give a gentleman a tolerable idea of the State of any country he is pleased to make the subject of his inquiries. Here the senator and politician may view the confitution, forces, and revenues, of the respective kingdoms and states; the divine may observe the religion and superstition of the relpective people ; the merchant, and marine officer, the produce, trattic, periodical winds and seafons, in the various climates of the globe.

In those that have not read larger accounts, it inay create an appetite to search further into there interesting subjects, and in those who have been convertant in larger works, it may revive the meinory of what they have read, and prevent that confusion in chronology and geography which is too apt to attend the reading many hiftories of ditferent countries.

Anc

And as the state of our own country concerns us more than that of any other, I have been more particular in the description of the British isles than of any other part of the world. Foreigners justly expect from us a better account of our own country than of diftant nations.

But notwithstanding I have been more particular in considering the state of the British illes than that of some other countries, I would not be thought to want a due regard for all mankind. As I am a citizen of the world, I look upon all men as my brethren ; and have long endeavoured to set them right in their notions of one another.

I am extremely concerned to see almost every people representing the inhabitants of distant nations as barbarians, and treating them as such.

For my part, I have met with people as polite, ingenious, and humane, whom we have been taught to look upon as cannibals, as ever I conversed with in Europe ; and, from my own experience, am convinced, that human nature is every where the fame ; allowances being made for unavoidable prejudices, occasioned by custom, education, and sarage principles, instilled into many in their infancy by ignorant, superstitious, or designing men. And, as I have observed on other occafions, nothing has contributed more to render the world barbarous, than their having been taught from their cradles, that every nation almost, but their own, are barbarians. They first imagine the people of distant nations to be monsters of cruelty aad barbarity; and then prepare to invade and extirpate them, exercising greater cruelties than ever fuch nations were charged with ; which was exactly the case of the Spaniards, and the natives

But to proceed in giving some further account of the present undertaking : I have not only en

deavoured

of America,

dern History, or the present state of all nations, as will 'render the work agreeable to every taste.

It is a very just observation, That a writer must not expect many readers, who does not accommodate himself to the taste of those gentlemen to whom he addresses his work.

And we need not be at a loss to know what is agreeable to most people, when we find every gentleman, and almost every lady, inquiring into the history of the day, and reading the most trifling occurrences, which nothing but the novelty can recommend.

These they are not afraid to venture upon, when contained in a handsome volume; while a folio of any dimensions, replenished with the most interesting truths, would lye neglected, under an apprehension that it was imposible to go through it, or to retain in their memories what it contained, if they should attempt it.

This work, therefore, has the charms of brevity, as well as novelty, to engage a general attention. An hour's reading will give a gentleman a tolerable idea of the state of any country he is pleased to make the subject of his inquiries. Here the senator and politician may view the constitution, forces, and revenues, of the respective kingdoms and states; the divine may observe the religion and superstition of the respective people ; the merchant, and marine officer, the produce, traffic, periodical winds and seasons, in the various climates of the globe.

In those that have not read larger accounts, it inay create an appetite to search further into these interesting fubjects, and in those who have been conversant in larger works, it may

revive the memory of what they have read, and prevent that confusion in chronology and geography whicli is too apt to attend the reading many histories of different countries.

And

And as the state of our own country concerns us more than that of any other, I have been more particular in the description of the British isles than of any other part of the world. Foreigners justly expect from us a better account of our own country than of distant nations.

But notwithstanding I have been more particular in considering the state of the British ifles than that of some other countries, I would not be thought to want a due regard for all mankind. As I am a citizen of the world, I look upon all men as my brethren ; and have long endeavoured to set them right in their notions of one another.

I am extremely concerned to see almost every people representing the inhabitants of distant nations as barbarians, and treating them as such.

For my part, I have met with people as polite, ingenious, and humane, whom we have been taught to look upon as cannibals, as ever I conversed with in Europe ; and, from my own experience, am convinced, that human nature is every where the fame ; allowances being made for unavoidable prejudices, occasioned by custom, education, and favage principles, instilled into many in their infancy by ignorant, superstitious, or designing men. And, as I have observed on other occasions, nothing has contributed more to render the world barbarous, than their having been taught from their cradles, that every nation almost, but their own, are barbarians. They first imagine the people of distant nations to be monsters of cruelty and barbarity; and then prepare to invade and extirpate them, exercising greater cruelties than ever fuch nations were charged with ; which was exactly the case of the Spaniards, and the natives of America.

But to proceed in giving some further account of the present undertaking : I have not only en

deavoured

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