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" All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give him the greater commendation: he was... "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, in Ten Volumes: The author's life ... - Page 65
by William Shakespeare - 1823
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Miscellaneous and Fugitive Pieces, Volume 2

Samuel Johnson - English literature - 1774 - 375 pages
...' luckily: When he defcribes any Thing, you more 4 than fee it, you feel it too. Thofe who accufe ' him to have wanted Learning, give him the greater...learned: He * needed not the Spectacles of Books to read Na* ture ; he looked inwards, and found her there. ' I cannot fay he is every where alike ; were he...
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Miscellaneous and Fugitive Pieces, Volume 2

English literature - 1774
...luckily: When he defcfibes any 1 hing, you more ' than fee it, you feel it too. Thofe who accufc •' him to have wanted Learning, give him the greater...learned: He ' needed not the Spectacles of Books to rea<i Na'* ture$ he looked inwards, and found her there. ' I cannot fay 'he is every where alike ;...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1803
...nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too....there. I cannot say he is every where alike ; were lie so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and...
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The Monthly Mirror: Reflecting Men and Manners: With Strictures ..., Volume 17

1804
...He ťas naturally learned. He needed not the spectacles of books to read nature. He looked inward, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where...Were he so, I should do him injury to compare him to the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid ; his comic w'it degenerating into clenches;...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 2

Hugh Blair - English language - 1807
...commendation. He was naturally learned. He needed net (he spectacles of books to read nature. He looked inward, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where...Were he so, I should do him injury, to compare him tu the greatest of mankind, He is many times Gat and insipid ; his comic wit degenerating into clenches...
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The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th], Volume 5, Part 1

1809
...nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it — you feel it too....read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. 1 cannot say he is every where alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, L. L. D.: In Twelve Volumes, Volume 2

Samuel Johnson - 1809
...drew them not laboriously, but luckily ; \vhen he describes any thing, you. more than se,e it, yow feel it too. Those, who accuse him to have wanted...naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of booka to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike...
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1810
...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel if too. Those, who accuse him to have wanted learning,...commendation : he was naturally learned: he needed not the sfiectacles of books to read nature •; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is...
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Lectures on rhetoric and belles lettres, Volume 3

Hugh Blair - 1811
...was natur" ally learned. He needed not the spectacles of books to read " nature. He looked inward, and found her there. I cannot " say he is every where alike. Were he so, I should do him in" jury to compare him to the greatest of mankind. He is many " times flat and insipid; his comic...
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Elegant extracts: a copious selection of passages from the most ..., Volume 2

Elegant extracts - 1812
...Mr. Waller among .the English. Dryden. REMARKS ON SOME OF THE UEST ENGLISH DRAMATIC POETS. SHAKSPEARE was the man who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles oi books to read nature ; he looked inwards, an.l found her there. I cannot say he is every when alike;...
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