The Secret of Wealth

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2005 - Business & Economics - 236 pages
According to Franklyn Hobbs, the secret of wealth is no secret and it isn't new. As he points out, "for more than 2,000 years, it has been understood that the person who was poor and let it be known, and made little or no effort to rise above poverty, was largely responsible for his own unhappy condition." In this book, Hobbs explains exactly how to take responsibility for one's own financial well-being. "Wealth is a state of mind or perhaps 'twould be better to say that wealth is created through a state of mind.. The acquiring of money and property, once begun, is a simple and easy process; growing rich comes through habits that are such fixed parts of one's daily life that, once on the road to wealth, it would be quite difficult, if not wholly impossible, to stop the growth."

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Contents

Section 1
xi
Section 2
29
Section 3
34
Section 4
44
Section 5
69
Section 6
75
Section 7
97
Section 8
157
Section 9
163
Section 10
169
Section 11
176
Section 12
195
Section 13
230
Copyright

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Page 120 - He is an American, who leaving behind him all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds. He becomes an American by being received in the broad lap of our great Alma Mater.
Page 57 - They joined in desiring him to speak his mind, and, gathering round him, he proceeded as follows : — " Friends," says he, " the taxes are indeed very heavy ; and, if those laid on by the government were the only ones we had to pay, we might more easily discharge them ; but we have many others, and much more grievous to some of us. We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride, and four times as much by our folly; and from these taxes the commissioners cannot ease...
Page 51 - Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
Page 120 - ... all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds. "He becomes an American by being received in the broad lap of our great Alma Mater. Here individuals of all nations are melted into a new race of men, whose labors and posterity will one day cause great changes in the world.
Page 153 - It will be time enough to enjoy an estate when it comes into our hands ; but if we anticipate our good fortune, we shall lose the pleasure of it when it arrives, and may possibly never possess what we have so foolishly counted upon.
Page 57 - Neighbours, the Taxes are indeed very heavy, and if those laid on by the Government were the only Ones we had to pay, we might more easily discharge them; but we have many others, and much more grievous to some of us. We are taxed twice as much by our Idleness, three times as much by our Pride, and four times as much by our Folly, and from these Taxes the Commissioners cannot ease or deliver us by allowing an Abatement.
Page 33 - Then he goes on to warn his hearers how there is always a counterfeit in this world of the noblest message and teaching. Thus there are two freedoms — the false, where a man is free to do what he likes ; the true, where a man is free to do what he ought.
Page 22 - The longer I live, the more I am certain that the great difference between men, between the feeble and the powerful, the great and the insignificant, is energy — invincible determination ; a purpose once fixed and then death or victory. That quality will do anything that can be done in this world, and no talents, no circumstances, no opportunities, will make a two-legged creature a man without it.
Page 177 - Washington can never be otherwise than well. — The measure of his fame is full. — Posterity will talk of him with reverence as the founder of a great empire, when my name shall be lost in the vortex of Revolutions...

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