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States the ages for military service shall be for the time being 20 to 44 years, both inclusive: Provided, however, That no citizen of the United States in Great Britain and no British subject in the United States who, before proceeding to Great Britain or the United States, respectively, was ordinarily resident in a place in the possessions of the United States or in His Majesty's dominions, respectively, where the law does not impose compulsory military service shall, by virtue of this convention, be liable to military service under the laws and regulations of Great Britain or the United States, respectively: Provided, further, That in the event of compulsory military service being applied to any part of His Majesty's dominions in which military service at present is not compulsory, British subjects who before proceeding to the United States were ordinarily resident in such part of His Majesty's dominions, shall thereupon be included within the terms of this convention.

ARTICLE II. Citizens of the United States and British subjects within the age limits aforesaid who desire to enter the military service of their own country must, after making such application therefor as may be prescribed by the laws or regulations of the country in which they are, enlist or enroll or must leave Great Britain or the United States, as the case may be, for the purpose of military service in their own country before the expiration of 60 days after the date of the exchange of ratifications of this convention, if liable to military service in the country in which they are at the said date; or if not so liable, then before the expiration of 30 days after the time when liability shall accrue; or as to those holding certificates of exemption under Article III of this convention, before the expiration of 30 days after the date on which any such certificate becomes inoperative unless sooner renewed; or as to those who apply for certificates of exemption under Article III and whose applications are refused, then before the expiration of 30 days after the date of such refusal, unless the application be sooner granted.

ARTICLE III. The Government of the United States and His Britannic Majesty's Government may through their respective diplomatic representatives issue certificates of exemption from military service to citizens of the United States in Great Britain and British subjects in the United States, respectively, upon application or otherwise, within 60 days from the date of the exchange of ratifications of this convention, or within 30 days from the date when such citizens or subjects become liable to military service in accordance with Article I, provided that the applications be made or the certificates be granted prior to their entry into the military service of either country.

Such certificates may be special or general, temporary or conditional, and may be modified, renewed, or revoked in the discretion of the Government granting them. Persons holding such certificates shall, so long as the certificates are in force, not be liable to military service in the country in which they are.

ARTICLE IV.

This convention shall not apply to British subjects in the United States (a) who are born or naturalized in Canada, and who, before proceeding to the United States, were ordinarily resident in Great Britain or Canada or in any other part of His Majesty's Dominions to which compulsory military service has been or may be hereafter by law applied, or outside the British Dominions; or (b) who were not born or naturalized in Canada, but who before proceeding to the United States were ordinarily resident in Canada.

ARTICLE V.

The Government of the United States and His Britannie Majesty's Government will, respectively, so far as possible facilitate the return of British subjects and citizens of the United States who may desire to return to their own country for military service, but shall not be responsible for providing transport or the cost of transport for such persons.

ARTICLE VI.

No citizen or subject of either country who, under the provisions of this convention, enters the military service of the other shall, by reason of such service, be considered after this convention shall have expired or after his discharge to have lost his nationality or to be under any allegiance to His Britannic Majesty or to the United States, as the case may be.

ARTICLE VII.

The present convention shall be ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, and by His Britannic Majesty, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington or at London as soon as possible. It shall come into operation on the date on which the ratifications are exchanged and shall remain in force until the expiration of 60 days after either of the contracting parties shall have given notice of termination to the other; whereupon any subject or citizen of either country incorporated into the military service of the other under this convention shall be as soon as possible discharged therefrom.

In witness whereof the respective plenipotentiaries have signed the present convention and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done in duplicate at Washington the 3d day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and eighteen.

ROBERT LANSING. (SEAL.]
READING.

(SEAL.] PART II.

CONVENTION RELATING TO THE SERVICE OF CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES IN

CANADA AND OF CANADIANS IN THE UNITED STATES.

The President of the United States of America and His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of the British Dominions Beyond the Seas, Emperor of India being convinced that for the better prosecution of the present war it is desirable that citizens of the United States in Canada and Canadian British subjects in the United States shall either return to their own country to perform military service in its Army or shall serve in the Army of the country in which they remain, have resolved to enter into a convention to that end and have accordingly appointed as their plenipotentiaries the President of the United States of America, Robert Lansing, Secretary of State of the United States, and His Britannic Majesty, the Earl of Reading, Lord Chief Justice of England, high commissioner and ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary on special mission to the United States, who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers found to be in proper form, have agreed upon and concluded the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

All male citizens of the United States in Canada (hereinafter called Americans) and all male British subjects in the United States (a) who were born or naturalized in Canada, and who, before proceeding to the United States were ordinary resident in Great Britain or Canada or in any other part of His Majesty's Dominions to which compulsory military service has been or may be hereafter by law applied, or outside the British Dominions; or (b) who were not born or naturalized in Canada, but who, before proceeding to the United States, were ordinarily resident in Canada (hereinafter called Canadians), shall, unless before the time limited by this convention they enlist or enroll in the forces of their own country or return to the United States or Canada, respectively, for the purpose of military service, be subject to military service and entitled to exemption or discharge therefrom under the laws and regulations, from time to time in force, of the country in which they are: Provided, That in respect to Americans, in Canada, the ages for military service shall be the ages specified in the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service, and in respect to Canadians in the United States the ages for military service shall be for the time being 20 to 44 years, both inclusive.

ARTICLE II.

Americans and Canadians within the age limits aroresaid who desire to enter the military service of their own country must enlist or enroll or must leave Canada or the United States, as the case may be, for the purpose of military service in their own country before the expiration of 60 days after the date of the exchange of ratifications of this convention, if liable to military service in the country in which they are at the said date; or if not so liable, then before the expiration of 30 days after the time when liability shall accrue; or, as to those holding certificates of exemption under Article III of this convention, be

fore the expiration of 30 days after the date on which any such certificate becomes inoperative unless sooner renewed; or as to those who apply for certificates of exemption under Article III, and whose applications are refused, then before the expiration of 30 days after the date of such refusal, unless the application be sooner granted.

ARTICLE III.

The Government of the United States, through the consul general at Ottawa, and His Britannic Majesty's Government through the British ambassador at Washington, may issue certificates of exemption from military service to Americans and Canadians, respectively, upon application or otherwise, within 60 days from the date of the exchange of ratifications of this convention or within 30 days from the date when such citizens or subjects become liable to military service in accordance with Article I, provided that the applications be made or the certificates be granted prior to their entry into the military service of either country. Such certificates may be special or general, temporary or conditional, and may be modified, renewed, or revoked in the discretion of the Government granting them. Persons holding such certificates shall, so long as the certificates are in force, not be liable to military service in the country in which they are.

ARTICLE IV.

The Government of the United States and the Government of Canada will, respectively, so far as possible facilitate the return of Canadians and Americans who may desire to return to their own country for military service, but shall not be responsible for providing transport or the cost of transport for such persons.

ARTICLE V.

No citizen or subject of either country who, under the provisions of this convention, enters the military service of the other shall, by reason of such service, be considered, after this convention shall have expired or after his discharge, to have lost his nationality or to be under any allegiance to the United States or to His Britannic Majesty, as the case may be.

ARTICLE VI.

The present convention shall be ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, and by His Britannic Majesty, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington or at London as soon as possible. It shall come into operation on the date on which the ratifications are exchanged and shall remain in force until the expiration of 60 days after either of the contracting parties shall have given notice of termination to the other; whereupon any citizen or subject of either country incorprated into the military service of the other under this convention shall be as soon as possible discharged therefrom,

In witness whereof the respective plenipotentiaries have signed the present convention and have aflixed thereto their seals.

Done in duplicate at Washington the third day of June, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighteen.

ROBERT LANSING. [SEAL.]
READING.

[SEAL.]

RECESS.

NOTES RELATING TO ARTICLE I.

BRITISH EMBASSY,

Washington, June 3, 1918. Hon. ROBERT LANSING,

Secretary of State of the United States. Sir: With reference to the military-service convention between the United States and Great Britain signed to-day, I am instructed by His Majesty's Gov. ernment to explain why the proviso to Article I does not limit the military service of citizens of the United States in Great Britain to those of the ages specified in the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service, as requested by the United States Government. The reason for the omission of this clause in the proviso is a desire to avoid the delay that would be involved in modifying the military service acts, 1916 to 1918, which con

trol the operation of any convention of this character. I beg you, therefore, to be good enough not to press this proposal.

The effect of these acts is to make United States citizens in Great Britain under this convention liable to military service between the ages of 18 and 49, both inclusive. The limitation of the ages of United States citizens in Great Britain for the purpose of military service to those prescribed in the laws of the United States relating to compulsory military service may, however, be attained without amendment of these acts by exercise of the United States of its right of exemption under Article III.

His Majesty's Governinent understands, therefore, that the United States Government will exercise their right under Article III to exempt from compulsory military service in Great Britain all citizens of the United States in Great Britain outside the ages specified in the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service. I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, Your most obedient, humble servant,

READING.

JUNE 3, 1918. His Excellency the EARL OF READING,

Ambassador of Great Britain on Special Mission: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Your Excellency's note of this date in regard to the military service convention between the United States and Great Britain, signed to-day, in which you state that you are instructed to explain why the proviso to Article I does not limit the military service of citizens of the United States in Great Britain to those of the ages specified in the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service as requested by the United States Government. In explanation Your Excellency states as follows:

The reason for the omission of this clause in the proviso is a desire to avoid the delay which would be involved in modifying the military service acts, 1916 to 1918, which control the operation of any convention of this character. I beg you, therefore, to be good enough not to press this proposal.

The effect of these acts is to make United States citizens in Great Britain under this convention liable to military service between the ages of 18 and 49 years, both inclusive. The limitation of the ages of United States citizens in Great Britain for the purposes of military service to those prescribed in the laws of the United States relating to compulsory military service may, however, be attained without amendment of these acts by the exercise by the United States of its right of exemption under Article III.

Your Excellency adds that

His Majesty's Government understands, therefore, that the United States Government will exercise its right under Article III to exempt from compulsory military service in Great Britain all citizens of the United States in Great Britain outside the ages specified in the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service.

In reply I have the honor to inform your excellency that the Government of the United States is pleased to accept this explanatiou of said Article I, and, in lieu of a clause in this article limiting the military service of citizens of the United States in Great Britain to those of the ages specified in the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service, to exercise its right under Article III to exempt from compulsory military service in Great Britain all citizens of the United States in Great Britain outside of the ages specified in the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service. I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, Your excellency's most obedient servant,

ROBERT LANSING. l'pon exchange of ratifications a certificate signed by the President in the following form will be issued exempting from military service citizens of the United States in Great Britain outside of the ages specified from time to time by the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service for citizens of the United States. In accordance with such certificate and the provisions of Article III of the convention in respect of citizens of the United States in Great Britain certificates of exemption will be issued to citizens of the United States in Great Britain outside the ages specified in the laws of the United States prescribing from time to time compulsory military service for citizens of the United States.

GENERAL CERTIFICATE.

Whereas the convention concluded on June 3, 1918, between the Government of the United States and the Government of Great Britain in respect to compulsory military service of the citizens or subjects of either party in the territories of the other, provides in Article III that:

“The Government of the United States and His Britannic Majesty's Government may, through their respective diplomatic representatives, issue certificates of exemption from military service to citizens of the United States in Great Britain and British subjects in the United States, respectively, upon application or otherwise, within 60 days from the date of the exchange of ratifica. tions of this convention, or within 30 days from the date when such citizens or subjects become liable to military service in accordance with Article I, provided that the applications be made or the certificates be granted prior to their entry into the military service of either country.

“Such certificates may be special or general, temporary or conditional, and may be modified, renewed, or revoked in the discretion of the Government granting them. Persons holding such certificates shall, so long as the certificates are in force, not be liable to military service in the country in which they are."

And whereas, by an exchange of notes dated June 3, 1918, between the parties of said convention in relation to Article I thereof, it is understood that the Government of the United States will exercise its right under Article III to exempt from compulsory military service in Great Britain all citizens of the United States in Great Britain outside of the ages specified in the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service for citizens of the United States,

Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, by virtue of authority of Article III of said convention, hereby certify, in the name of the Government of the United States, that all citizens of the United States in Great Britain outside the ages specified from time to time in the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service for citizens of the United States are and shall be exempt from compulsory military service in Great Britain.

V. WAR-RISK INSURANCE LAW.

AN ACT To amend an Act entitled "An Act to authorize the establishment of a Bureau of

War-Risk Insurance in the Treasury Department,” approved September second, nineteen hundred and fourteen, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the first section of the act entitled "An act to authorize the establishment of a Bureau of War-Risk Insurance in the Treasury Department," approved September second, nineteen hundred and fourteen, as amended, is hereby amended to read as follows:

"ARTICLE I.

“ SECTION 1. That there is established in the Treasury Department a bureau to be known as the Bureau of War-Risk Insurance, the director of which shall receive a salary at the rate of $5,000 per annum.

“ That there be in such bureau a Division of Marine and Seamen's Insurance and a Division of Military and Naval Insurance in charge of a commissioner of Marine and Seamen's Insurance and a commissioner of Military and Naval Insurance, respectively, each of whom shall receive a salary of $4,000 per annum."

SEC. 2. That such act of September second, nineteen hundred and fourteen, as amended, is hereby amended by adding new sections, as follows:

“ SEC. 12. That sections two to seven, inclusive, and section nine, shall be construed to refer only to the Division of Marine and Seamen's Insurance.

“ SEC. 13. That the director, subject to the general direction of the Secretary of the Treasury, shall administer, execute, and enforce the provisions of this act, and for that purpose have full power and authority to make rules and regulations, not inconsistent with the provisions of this act, necessary or appropriate to carry out its purposes, and shall decide all questions arising under the act, except as otherwise provided in sections five and four hundred and five. Wherever under any provision or provisions of the act regulations are directed or authorized to be made, such regulations, unless the context otherwise requires,

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