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testimony documenting the Labor Department's failure to conduct meaningful wage determination studies.

I commend you for these hearings. I think you have performed a fine service and I would also echo your views; that is, I wish the Labor Department would be a little more responsive.

Now, I notice that you received a lot of testimony on the specifics, particularly with regard to Florida and the cape area and I don't intend to go over those. I would rather address myself to the question of the Government's relationship with its citizens in this part of the statement and, in particular, the crises of the men and women involved in the Nation's space program.

In 1957, when the Russians launched the first satellite, sputnik, our Nation was shocked and this shock gave way to the determination by the United States of America to become the leader in space technology and we announced our challenge which became known around the world as a "race to the moon."

The Government asked industry and educational institutions and especially workers of America to respond by dedicating themselves to this goal. I don't need to describe, of course, what took place over the next 10 years. We all had opportunity to review those results ourselves on our television sets, but we witnessed only the culmination of this effort. Our visual sharing represented, of course, the tip of the iceberg only. Beneath that tip were hundreds of thousands of man-hours dedicated to making this Nation first in space technology.

Man's greatest adventure has awarded its society with hundreds of spin-off benefits and we enjoyed tremendous breakthroughs in the field of medicine and unique benefits in dozens of unrelated industries. Now we see some architects and builders and especially workers that provided all of these things being rewarded with unresponsiveness in time of the great need and our current mistreatment of thousands and thousands of technicians and laborers reminds me of the tale of the village that wanted to cross the sea. The villagers looked around the land and there were few oarsmen courageous enough to man the vessels but finally some men agreed to try and the village began their voyage.

The oarsmen endured rough seas and the heat of the sun and perils of the storms and thirst and hunger and regardless of the obstacles they kept rowing and finally the vessel crossed the sea and arrived at the new land entering the harbor. The villagers became fearful there wouldn't be enough for all in the new land, so they threw the oarsmen out of the boat and into the sea and today I think at the Kennedy Space Center we are witnessing the oarsmen of our space program being cast into the sea, too, a sea of highly trained and middle-aged, unemployable families, a sea of broken retirement contracts and repossessed homes and personal and economic despair.

Unfortunately, in view of what appears to be the current attitude of the Department of Labor, this sea may well become deeper.

I think what we have before us is a moral question as well as a legal and technical question. This Congress must decide whether it is moral to trade men's wages and careers for the sake of expediency and this Congress must today decide if it is moral to turn our back on men and women who have given up more than half of their productive years in order to respond to a challenge their Government issued. It is my sincere opinion that all of our branches of government must take

immediate steps to see that our laws are regarded as relationships among men and not relationshipwise just other laws, and these services contracts are contracts with men, people, and not numbers and their contracts cannot be viewed only in terms of dollars. They must be viewed and analyzed in terms of the ultimate benefit to all of us.

Mr. Chairman, I ask your committee to give most serious consideration, not only to legal and technical aspects of these hearings that I know you heard abundant evidence on, but to this very moral question, the answer to which will affect lives of millions of workers and their respective families in their future contracts with the good faith of this Government.

On all counts, I think the evidence will be overwhelming that in the bid and award of service contracts, workers' wages should not be put up for auction to be sold to the lowest bidder. Let there be a wage study, a determination of reasonable average wages so that the worker will be protected and the Government and Nation will be better served.

I have a number of letters, Mr. Chairman, that I would like to put in the record. They show many facts.

Mr. THOMPSON. Without objection, any of those, Senator, that you would like in the record will be entered at this point.

To Whom It May Concern:

I have had four years of electrical experience while serving in the Navy, then six years with Trans World Airlines. At the end of March, 1971, I was earning $5.45 per hour plus longevity with an increase due in May. I have a wife and four children. I have been attending school during the past few months trying to retrain so as to be able to seek employment in this area, outside of my trade. I had filed an application for employment with Boeing through the union; I filed again on my own in May and I have recently been offered a job with Boeing-after the third application submitted, which was filed in August. They made an offer of $3.45 per hour for the midnight shift and with conditions presently as they are, I am forced to accept this offer.

WILLARD J. BRACKEN, Jr.

Cocoa, FLA., February 2, 1971. Mr. C. W. MOGEE, Jr., The Boeing Company, Field Operations and Support Division, Cocoa Beach, Fla.

DEAR MR. McGEE: I believe a mistake has been made in your employment offer dated January 30, 1971.

I am a Lead Mechanic, Instrument and Control.

I have 30 years experience in the field of Industrial Instruments, Electrical and Electronic Test Equipment of all types.

I will not accept a position as an Electrician at a salary of $3.79 per hour. I would appreciate another meeting in order to discuss this matter with you. Sincerely,

E. S. HALTEMAN, Jr.

SPACE DIVISION,

Cocoa BEACH, FLA., January 11, 1971. Mr. JAMES C. ALLIGOOD Cape Canaveral, Fla.

DEAR MR. ALLIGOOD : Based on discussions with our representative, The Boeing Company is pleased to offer you employment as a Storekeeper at a starting salary of $3.32 per hour.

This offer is contingent upon the final award by the Government of the Installation Support Services Contract at Kennedy Space Center and the work is scheduled to start by April 1, 1971.

We would appreciate a response to our offer within one week. Upon acceptance we will arrange at time for you to be at the Boeing Employment Office located at 7099 North Atlantic Avenue, Cape Canaveral, Florida for processing. You

will be required to show your social security card, proof of birthdate, and dis-
charge papers (if you ever served in the armed forces). If we have not been
contacted within one week, we must assume the offer is rejected.
If you have any questions relative to this offer, please call 783–1440.
Sincerely,

THE BOEING Co.,
Field Operations and Support Division.

C. W. McGEE, Jr.
Employment Supervisor.

THE BOEING Co.,

Cocoa Beach, Fla., January 11, 1971. Mr. GEORGE E. CONNOLLY, Cocoa, Fla.

DEAR MR. CONNOLLY : Based on discussions with our representative, The Boeing Company is pleased to offer you employment as a Storekeeper C at a starting salary of $3.32 per hour:

This offer is contingent upon the final award by the Government of the Installation Support Services Contract at Kennedy Space Center and the work is scheduled to start by April 1, 1971.

We would appreciate a response to our offer within one week. Upon accep:ance we will arrange a time for you to be at the Boeing Employment Office located at 7099 North Atlantic Avenue, Cape Canaveral, Florida for processing. You will be required to show your social security card, proof of birthdate, and discharge papers (if you ever served in the armed forces). If we have not been contacted within one week we must assume the offer is rejected. If you have any questions relative to this offer please call 783–1440. Sincerely,

THE BOEING Co., Field Operations and Support Division.

C. W. McGEE, Jr.,
Employment Supervisor.

THE BOEING CO.,
FIELD OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT DIVISION,

January 12, 1971.
Mr. ROBERT A. Brown,
Merritt Island, Fla.

DEAR MR. BROWN: The Boeing Company is pleased to offer you employment as a Maintenance Utility Man at a starting salary of $3.455 per hour based on a 40-hour week.

This offer is contingent upon the final award by the Government of the Installation Support Services Contract at Kennedy Space Center and the work is scheduled to start by April 1, 1971.

We would appreciate a response to our offer by one week from receipt of this letter. Upon acceptance we will arrange a time for you to be at the Boeing Employment Office located at 7099 North Atlantic Avenue, Cape Canaveral, Florida for processing. You will be required to show your social security card, proof of birth, and discharge papers (if you ever served in the armed forces). If we have not been contacted within one week we must assume the offer is rejected. If you have any questions relative to this offer please call 783–1440. Sincerely,

C. W. MOGEE, Jr.,

Employment Supervisor.

THE BOEING Co.,
FIELD OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT DIVISION,

SPACE DIVISION,

Cocoa Beach, Fla., January 11, 1971. Mr.ROBERT R. CARON, Indian Harbour Beach, Fla.

DEAR MR. CARON : Based on discussions with our representative, The Boeing Company is pleased to offer you employment as an Expediter at a starting salary of $3.055 per hour.

This offer is contingent upon the final award by the Government of the Installation Support Services Contract at Kennedy Space Center and the work is scheduled to start by April 1, 1971.

We would appreciate a response to our offer within one week. Upon acceptance, we will arrange a time for you to be at the Boeing Employment Office located at 7099 North Atlantic Avenue, Cape Canaveral, Florida for processing. You will be required to show your social security card, proof of date of birth, and discharge papers (if you ever served in the armed forces). If we have not been contacted within one week, we must assume the offer is rejected. If you have any questions relative to this offer, please call 783–1440. Sincerely,

C. W. McGEE,
Employment Supervisor. ·

THE BOEING Co.,
FIELD OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT DIVISION,

SPACE DIVISION,

Cocoa Beach, Fla., January 11, 1971, Mr. WILLIAM D. DUNN, P.O. Box 111 Geneva, Fla.'

DEAR MR. DUNN: Based on discussions with our representative, The Boeing Company is pleased to offer you employment as an Electrician at a starting salary of $3.79 per hour.

This offer is contingent upon the final award by the Government of the Installation Support Services Contract at Kennedy Space Center and the work is scheduled to start by April 1, 1971.

We would appreciate a response to our offer within one week. Upon acceptance, we will arrange a time for you to be at the Boeing Employment Office located at 7099 North Atlantic Avenue, Cape Canaveral, Florida for processing. You will be required to show your social security card, proof of birthdate, and discharge papers (if you ever served in the armed forces). If we have not been contacted within one week, we must assume the offer is rejected. If you have any questions relative to this offer, please call 783–1440. Sincerely,

C. W. MOGEE
Employment Supervisor.

THE BOEING Co.,
FIELD OPERATIONS & SUPPORT DIVISION,

Cocoa Beach, Fla., March 12, 1971.
Mr. LLOYD L. MURRAY,
Titusville, Fla.

DEAR MR. MURRAY: The Boeing Company is pleased to offer you employment as a Painter at a starting salary of $3.79 per hour based on a 40-hour work week.

We are looking forward to having you as a member of our organization and would appreciate a response to our offer within one week from receipt of this letter. You can consider this offer withdrawn if we do not hear from you.

Upon acceptance to our offer, please call 783--1442 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. for a suitable date for new hire processing. You will be required to bring your social security card, proof of birth, and armed forces discharge papers (if applicable) for this processing. Sincerely,

C. W. MOGEE, Jr., Employment Supervisor.

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION,

1. Kennedy Space Center, Fla., February 24, 1971, To: STDL-B. From : Director of Administration, AD. Subject: Support Services Procurements-Improper Restrictions on the Hiring

of Personnel. - As you are aware, KSC, as well as several other NASA installations, has been actively engaged in recompeting support services requirements, when this has led to the replacement of an incumbent contractor with a new company, a majority of the existing personnel are usually hired by the new company. In some instances NASA has encouraged the practice of hiring incumbents even to the point of requiring proposers on support services contract procurements to propose that a substantial specified percentage of people to be hired by the proposers must be incumbent personnel and/or from the local area.

By direction from the Director of Procurement, NASA Headquarters, received by TWX at KSC on February 19, 1971, the practice of specifying incumbent hiring is to cease immediately. A quotation from that communication is furnished for your guidance:

"It is not, repeat not, NASA policy to impose restrictions on bidders or proposers as to where personnel who will perform the contract effort must be obtained from; and this includes either geographic or 'incumbency' restrictions. No such stipulations are to be made, either formally or informally, in SEB criteria, in the RFP, in discussions, or in any other communications medium."

Headquarters further warns that this prohibition should not be construed as requiring the opposite; i.e., that proposers must go nationwide to recruit personnel. It is up to the proposers to use their own judgment as to how they will acquire personnel and to so propose with their own rationale. NASA will evaluate such proposals in accordance with preestablished evaluation criteria.

I heartily recommend that this information be disseminated to all personnel in your organization who are involved in the procurement process in any way.

GEORGE A. VAN STADEN. Mr. GURNEY. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I won't go through all of them, but they illustrate in the case of people receiving $5, $5.65 an hour in the first one and, after the service contract at NASA, it was $3.79 and then receiving $5.45 and after award, $3.45, and so on, which seems unconscionable for doing precisely the same work before the new contract.

I would also like to thank Dean McCrosky, president of Local 673, the International Association of Machinists, who put some of this material together. I would also like to have included in the record a letter that I sent to Secretary Hodgson on October 1, requesting a wage study and this is the second request about Patrick Air Force Base.

OCTOBER 1, 1971. Hon. JAMES D. HODGSON, Secretary of Labor, Washington, D.C.

MY DEAR MR. SECRETARY: I am writing to respectfully request you to reconsider the Department's decision not to conduct a wage determination survey in the Brevard County Florida area. This relates to the Requests for Proposals/ Quotations (RFP) recently issued by the Air Force Systems Command for contractor operations and maintenance services at the Air Force Eastern Test Range (AFETR), Patrick Air Force Base, Florida.

In order to get a better feel for the existing situation I had an in-depth study made of the prevailing wage rates paid to electronic technicians in the area and other related matters. A copy of the study is attached.

Two entirely new factors have surfaced since your decision was made not to conduct a wage determination study at Patrick. I believe that these factors now clearly call for such a survey to be made.

First, it has just come to my attention that a similar RFP was issued for like services at the Space and Missile Test and Evaluation Center (SAMTEC), Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. I have learned that the SAMTEC RFP was amended on September 3, 1971, stating that the Service Contract Act of 1965 is applicable to this procurement and that a wage determination will be provided by the Department of Labor.

Second, my study conclusively shows that the services to be provided at SAMTEC and AFETR, as well as the wage patterns in the two areas, are practieally identical. Of significant importance is the fact that wages paid most electronic technicians at both SAMTEC and AFETR are considerably below the average wages paid for equivalent skills in the two arias. The situation at Patrick is so similar to Vandenberg, I cannot see how a wage study could be made at one and not the other. Thus, I cannot understand the inconsistency of your decision,

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