Page images
PDF
EPUB

CEAP.

VI. Enclosing_Fences-Gates.
VII. Arable Land.

Sect. I. -Tillage.

2.-Fallowing
3.-Rotation of Crops.
4.-Crops commonly cultivated.

5.-Crops not commonly cultivated. VIII. Grass,

SECT. I.Natural Meadows and Pastures.

2.--Artificial Grasses.
3.-Hay Harvest.

4.-Feeding
IX. Gardens and Orchards.

1

X. Woods and Plantations,

XI. Waites

XII. Improvements.

SECT. I.-Draining,

2.-Paring and Burning.
3.-Manuring.
4.-Weeding.

5.--Watering..
XIII. Live Stock.

SECT. 1.-Cattle.

2.-Sheep
3.-Horses,
4.-Hogs.
5.-Rabbits.
6.--Poultry.

1

Chap. XIII. continued.

Sect. 7.-Pigeons.

8.Bees. XIV. Rural Economy. Sect. 1.-Labour-Servants-Labourers

Hours of Labour. 2.-Provisions.

3.-Fuel.

XV. Political Economy, as connected with,

or affecting Agriculture. SECT. 1.-Roads.

2.-Canals.
+36Fairs.

4.-Weekly Markets.
5.-Commerce.
6.-Manufactures.
7.-Poor.

8.—Population.
XVI. Obstacles to Improvement,

Including General Observations on Agricultural Legii

lation and Police.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

XVII. Miscellaneous Observations.

Sect. 1.-Agricultural Societies.

2.-Weights and Measures.

Statistical Table of the County:
Observations respecting it.
Particulars respecting the different

Parishes
Conclusion

AGRICULTURAL SURVEY

OF THE

CONTINENT OF ARGYLE.

CHAPTER I.

GEOGRAPHICAL STATE AND CIRCUMSTANCES.

Sect. I.- Situation and Extent. The

He continental part of Argyleshire (exclusive of the islands belonging to that county) is situated between 55° 21' and 570 N. latitude, and between 1° 22' and 3° 25' of longitude, W. of Edinburgh *. Its general form approaches somewhat to that of a triangle ; of which a line running from the point of Ardnamurchan, along the borders of Invernessshire, to the source of the water of Urchy, at Moni-ranoch, may be considered as the base; and another line running from thence to the head of Lochlong and along the Frith of Clyde, as forming one of the sides; and the Atlantic Ocean the other. Its greatest length, from the Mull of Kintyre to the point of Ardnamurchan (1° 39', at the rate of 691 statute miles to the degree of lat.) is 115 miles; and its greatest breadth, reckoning 337 miles to the degree of longitude (which corresponds to the medium lat. of 56°) is above 68 miles.

* The county, including the ihands, extends to 57° 15' N. latitude, and to 4° 0' W. longitude. But as the islands make no part of the province affigned to the writer, any account he may give of them occasionally, as a part of the county, will of course be more general than that given of the continent.

On the two sides, which border on the sea, the land is everywhere indented with deep bays and creeks, winding in a variety of directions, so as to form the whole county into a number of peninsulas, and to afford a variety of fafe harbours. Some of these bays run so far into the country, that only one of 27 parishes is altogether inland. The extent of fea fhore which bounds the continent of Argyle, from the head of Lochlong round to the point of Ardnamurchan, is fupposed to exceed 600 miles. By this advantageous dispofition, the county has all the advantages of an infular fituation, without any of its inconveniencies.

As there is no particular map of the county, its dimenfions cannot be exactly ascertained. If we cut off the peninsula of Kintyre, which is 40 miles long, by 64 at a medium . breadth (making 260 square miles), the remaining continent, which is 75 miles in length, may be taken, it is thought, at the average breadth of 33 miles, which, added to Kintyre, will make the whole continent 2735 square miles. The illands connected with the county, are suppofed to make about 1063 miles more; so that the whole county, by this computation, will be 3800 square miles *.

By a calculation which lately appeared in the public papers (and which was afcribed to Sir John Sinclair), Scotland is made to contain 26,369,695 English acres, or 41,202 statute square miles; and England 46,915,953 acres, or 73,306

* See the Statistical Table, in C. XVII. A map of the county is expected foon from Mr. Langlands, land-surveyor to the Duke of Argyle; by which its exact dimensions will be better known. In the mean time, the writer thought it better to hazard the above conjecture, than to be altogether filent upon the subject.

« PreviousContinue »