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floating cover, which will rest on the surface of the liquid contents and be equipped with a closure seal or seals to close the space between the roof edge and tank wall. This control equipment may not be appropriate if the volatile organic compounds have a vapor pressure of 11 pounds per square inch absolute (568 mm. Hg) or greater under actual storage conditions. All tank gauging or sampling devices can be gas-tight except when tank gauging or sampling is taking place.

(b) A vapor recovery system, consisting of a vapor gathering system capable of collecting the volatile organic compound vapors and gases discharged, and a vapor disposal system capable of processing such volatile organic vapors and gases so as to prevent their emission to the atmosphere and all tank gauging and sampling devices can be gas-tight except when gauging or sampling is taking place. These emission limitations are not intended for application to underground tanks used for long-term storage, where filling operations occur frequently.

The storage of any volatile organic compound in any stationary storage vessel more than 250-gallon (950 liter) capacity can be in a vessel equipped with a permanent submerged fill pipe or fitted with a vapor recovery system. This emission limitation will reduce volatile organic emissions 90 to 100 percent from uncontrolled sources of storage in vessels 40,000 gallon capacity or greater and approximately 40 percent from uncontrolled sources of storage in vessels 250 gallon capacity or greater.

4.2 Volatile organic compounds loading facilities. The loading of volatile organic compounds into any tank, truck, or trailer having a capacity in excess of 200 gallons (760 liters) can be from a loading facility equipped with a vapor collection and disposal system. Also, the loading facility can be equipped with a loading arm with a vapor collection adaptor, pneumatic, hydraulic or other mechanical means to force a vaportight seal between the adaptor and the hatch. A means can be provided to prevent drainage of liquid organic compounds from the loading device when it is removed from the hatch of any tank, truck, or trailer, or to accomplish complete drainage before the removal. When loading is effected through means other than hatches, all loading and vapor lines can be equipped with fittings which make vapor-tight connections and which close automatically when disconnected. This emission limitation will result in 55 to 60 percent reduction in volatile organic emissions from uncontrolled sources in gasoline marketing and other organic transfer operations.

4.3 Volatile organic compounds water separation. Single or multiple compartment volatile organic compounds water separators which receive effluent water containing 200 gallons (760 liters) a day or more of any volatile organic compound from any equipment processing, refining, treating, storing or handling volatile organic compounds having a Reid vapor pressure of 0.5 pound or greater can be equipped with one of the following

vapor loss control devices, properly installed in good working order and in operation:

(a) A container having all openings sealed and totally enclosing the liquid contents. All gauging and sampling devices can be gastight except when gauging or sampling is taking place.

(b) A container equipped with a floating roof, consisting of a pontoon type, double deck type roof, or internal floating cover, which will rest on the surface of the contents and be equipped with a closure seal or seals to close the space between the roof edge and container wall. All gauging and sampling devices can be gas-tight except when gauging or sampling is taking place.

(c) A container equipped with a vapor recovery system consisting of a vapor gathering system capable of collecting the organic vapors and gases discharged and a vapor disposal system capable of processing such organic vapors and gases so as to prevent their emission to the atmosphere and with all container gauging and sampling devices gastight except when gauging or sampling is taking place. This emission limitation will reduce organic compound emissions from uncontrolled waste water separator units approximately 95 to 100 percent.

4.4 Pumps and compressors. All pumps and compressors handling volatile organic compounds can be equipped with mechanical seals or other equipment of equal efficiency.

4.5 Waste gas disposal. Any waste gas stream containing organic compounds from any ethylene producing plant or other ethylene emission source can be burned at 1,300° F. (704° C.) for 0.3 second or greater in a direct-flame afterburner or an equally effective device. This does not apply to emergency reliefs and vapor blowdown systems. The emission of organic compounds from a vapor blowdown system or emergency relief can be burned by smokeless flares, or an equally effective control device. This emission limitation will reduce organic compound emissions approximately 98 percent.

4.6 Organic solvents. The emission of organic compounds of more than 3 pounds (1.3 kg.) per hour or 15 pounds (6.8 kg.) per day from any equipment can be reduced by at least 85 percent. This can be accomplished by:

(a) Incineration, provided that 90 percent or more of the carbon in the organic compounds being incinerated is oxidized to carbon dioxide, or

(b) Carbon adsorption. This limitation can be applied to a variety of solvent users including industrial surface coatings, dry cleaning, degreasing and printing operations. Surface coating operations may appropriately be exempted from this limitation when the coating's solvent makeup is water-based and does not exceed 20 percent of organic compounds by volume. Organic solvents which have been shown to be virtually unreactive in the formation of oxidants, e.g., saturated halogenated hydrocarbons, perchlorethylene, benzene, acetone,

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and C.-C, n-paraffins also may be considered for exemption. Other compounds which have been shown to have low reactivity include cyclohexanone, ethyl acetate, diethylamine, isobutyl acetate, isopropyl alcohol, methyl benzoate, 2-nitropropane, phenyl acetate and triethylamine. This emission limitation may impose an economic burden upon some paint spray booth installations. If such sources are not major contributors to hydrocarbon pollution levels, they may appropriately be considered for exemption.

4.7 Architectural coatings for buildings. The emission of organic compounds from architectural coatings can be reduced by requiring the use of water-base or other coatings having an organic solvent content of less than 20 percent by volume. The effectiveness of the limitations set forth in $$ 4.6 and 4.7 will vary, depending on the nature and amounts of emissions in an area; a rough estimate based on Los Angeles emission data indicates that application of the limitation would result in a 70 percent reduction in organic solvent emissions. In estimating the effectiveness, it should be assumed that all organic emissions are reactive; use of exempt solvents as substitutes for regulated solvents may be considered 100 percent effective in reducing reactive organic solvent emissions. 5.0 CONTROL OF CARBON MONOXIDE EMISSIONS

The emissions of carbon monoxide can be limited by requiring complete secondary combustion of waste gas generated in such operations as a grey iron cupola, blast furnace, basic oxygen steel furnace, catalyst regeneration of a petroleum cracking system, petroleum fluid coker or other petroleum process. 6.0 CONTROL OF NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSIONS

6.1 Fuel burning equipment. The emission of nitrogen oxides, calculated as nitrogen dioxide, from gas-fired fuel burning equipment can be limited to 0.2 pound per million B.t.u. (0.36 gm/106 gm-cal) of heat input. This emission limitation is about equivalent to a nitrogen dioxide concentration of 175 p.p.m., by volume, on a dry basis at 3 percent oxygen and represents about a 50 percent reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions from uncontrolled gas-fired equipment.

The emission of nitrogen oxides, calculated as nitrogen dioxide, from oil-fired fuel burning equipment can be limited to 0.30 pound per million B.t.u. (0.54 gm /106 gm-cal) of heat input. This emission limitation is about equivalent to a nitrogen dioxide concentration of 230 p.p.m., by volume. on a dry basis, at 3 percent oxygen and represents about a 50 percent reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions from uncontrolled oilfired fuel burning equipment.

6.2 Nitric acid manufacture. The emission of nitrogen oxides, calculated as nitrogen dioxide, from nitric acid manufacturing plants can be limited to 5.5 pounds per ton (2.8 kg. /metric ton) of 100 percent acid produced. This emission limitation is about

equivalent to a nitrogen dioxide concentra-
tion of 400 p.p.m., by volume.
136 F.R. 23398, Nov. 25, 1971, as amended at
36 F.R. 25233, Dec. 30, 1971)
APPENDIX C-MAJOR POLLUTANT SOURCES

CHEMICAL PROCESS INDUSTRIES
Adipic acid.
Ammonia.
Ammonium nitrate.
Carbon black.
Charcoal.1
Chlorine.
Detergent and soap.1
Explosives (TNT and nitrocellulose).1
Hydrofluoric acid.1
Nitric acid.
Paint and varnish manufacturing.1
Phosphoric acid.1
Phthalic anhydride.
Plastics manufacturing.1
Printing ink manufacturing.1
Sodium carbonate.1
Sulfuric acid.1
Synthetic fibers.
Synthetic rubber.
Terephthalic acid.

FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES
Alfalfa dehydrating.1
Ammonium nitrate.
Coffee roastingi
Cotton ginning.1
Feed and grain.i
Fermentation processes.
Fertilizers1
Fish meal processing.
Meat smoke houses.1
Starch manufacturing.1
Sugar cane processing.1

METALLURGICAL INDUSTRIES
Primary metals industries:

Aluminum ore reduction."
Copper Smelters.1
Ferroalloy production.'
Iron and steel mills.1
Lead smelters.1
Metallurgical coke manufacturing.1

Zinc.1
Secondary metals industries:

Aluminum operations.1
Brass and bronze smelting.1
Ferroalloys.1
Gray iron foundries.1
Lead smelting.1
Magnesium smelting.1
Steel foundries.1
Zinc processes.1

MINERAL PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES
Asphalt roofing.1
Asphaltic concrete batching.1
Bricks and related clay refractories.
Calcium carbide 1
Castable refractories.1
Cement.1
Ceramic and clay processes.1

(See footnote 1 on page 108.)

Clay and fly ash sintering.
Coal cleaning.1
Concrete batching.1
Fiberglass manufacturing.1
Frit manufacturing.1
Glass manufacturing.1
Gypsum manufacturing.1
Lime manufacturing.1
Mineral wool manufacturing.1
Paperboard manufacturing.1
Perlite manufacturing.1
Phosphate rock preparation.1
Rock, gravel, and sand quarrying and proc-

essing.1

PETROLEUM REFINING AND PETROCHEMICAL

OPERATIONS 1

WOOD PROCESSING 1 PETROLEUM STORAGE (Storage tanks and

bulk terminals)

MISCELLANEOUS
Fossil fuel steam electric powerplants.1
Municipal or equivalent incinerators.1
Open burning dumps.

1 Major sources of sulfur oxides and/or particulate matter.

APPENDIX D—(POLLUTANT) EMISSIONS INVENTORY SUMMARY, TONS/YR. (OR METRIC TONS/YR.)

(EXAMPLE REGIONS)

--- AIR QUALITY CONTROL REGION DATA REPRESENTATIVE OF CALENDAR YEAR --

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

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I. Fuel combustion-stationary

sources:
A. Residential fuel:
1. Anthracite coal:

a. Area sources...

b. Point sources. 2. Bituminous coal:

a. Area sources...

b. Point sources.. 3. Distillate oil:

a. Area sources.-

b. Point sources.. 4. Residual oil:

a. Area sources.--

b. Point sources 5. Natural gas:

8. Area sources..

b. Point sources 6. Wood:

a. Area sources..

b. Point sources.7. Other (specify):

a. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 8. Total: B. Commercial and institutional fuel: 1. Anthracite coal:

a. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 2. Bituminous coal:

a. Area sources...

b. Point sources. 3. Distillate oil:

a. Area sources.-

b. Point sources... 4. Residual oil:

a. Area sources.

b. Point sources... 5. Natural Gas:

a. Area sources..

b. Point sources. 6. Wood:

a. Area sources..

b. Point sources... 7. Other (specify):

a. Area sources

b. Point sources.. 8. Total.--(Footnotes at end of table.)

APPENDIX D

(POLLUTANT) EMISSIONS INVENTORY SUMMARY, TONS/YR. (EXAMPLE REGIONS AND

WHERE EMISSION LIMITATIONS ARE DEVELOPED)-Continued

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APPENDIX D-(POLLUTANT) EMISSIONS INVENTORY SUMMARY, TONS/YR. (EXAMPLE REGIONS AND

WHERE EMISSION LIMITATIONS ARE DEVELOPED) —Continued

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D. Total solid waste disposal.
IV. Transportation (area sources
only):
A. Motor vehicles:

1. Gasoline powered '-.

2. Diesel powered.
B. Off-highway suel usage.
C. Aircraft.....
D. Railroads.
E. Vessels...
F. Gasoline handling evapo-

rative losses vi...
G. Other (specify). ---

H. Total transportation.---
V. Miscellaneous (area sources
only):

A. Forest fires...
B. Structural fires...
C. Coal refuse burning...
D. Agricultural burning
E. Other (specify)...

F. Total miscellaneous...

VI. Grand totals ......

A. Area sources..
B. Point sources.

C. Total...---------------i Included only if interstate region. ii “Existing Emissions''. iii “Emissions Achieved" with control regulations of implementation plans. Must be submitted in example regions.

iv For hydrocarbons only, would include emissions or surface coating operations, dry cleaning, degreasing operations, etc., unless considered point sources.

v For hydrocarbons, would include vehicle evaporative losses.

vi For hydrocarbons only, would include losses from filling tank trucks, service station tanks, and automobile tanks. APPENDIX E-POINT SOURCE DATA

D. Year in which data are recorded.

E. Future activities, if available (e.g., ad(The following information is not required

dition of new or expansion of existing facilto be submitted with an implementation

ities, changes in production rate, installation plan but must be available for inspection by the Administrator, EPA.)

of control equipment, phasing out of equip

ment, fuel change, etc.). 1. GENERAL SOURCE INFORMATION

F. Map or general layout of large complex A. Establishment name and address.

plants showing locations of various facilities, B. Person to contact on air pollution mat- if available,1 ters and telephone number.

II. FUEL COMBUSTION C. Operating schedule: 1. Percent of annual production by season. A. Number of boilers. 2. Days of week normally in operation.

B. Type of fuel burning equipment for 3. Shifts or hours of day normally in each boiler. operation.

4. Number of days per year in operation. (See footnote 1 on page 111.)

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