The Deathless Book

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New York [etc.] The Pilgrim Press, 1916 - Bible - 332 pages

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Page 179 - And Moses chose able men out of all Israel, and made them heads over the people, rulers of thousands, rulers of hundreds, rulers of fifties, and rulers of tens. And they judged the people at all seasons: the hard causes they brought unto Moses, but every small matter they judged themselves.
Page 259 - O thou afflicted, tossed with tempest, and not comforted, behold, I will lay thy stones with fair colours, and lay thy foundations with sapphires. And I will make thy windows of agates, and thy gates of carbuncles, and all thy borders of pleasant stones.
Page 246 - hast thou clothed his neck with thunder?" — he " laughs at the shaking of the spear ! " Such living likenesses were never since drawn. Sublime sorrow, sublime reconciliation ; oldest choral melody as of the heart of mankind; — so soft, and great; as the summer midnight, as the world with its seas and .stars! There is nothing written, I think, in the Bible or out of it, of equal literary merit.
Page 114 - In the beginning of the contest with Britain, when we were sensible of danger, we had daily prayers in this room for the divine protection ! Our prayers, sir, were heard ;---and they were graciously answered.
Page 296 - When the microscopic search of skepticism, which had hunted the heavens and sounded the seas to disprove the existence of a Creator, has turned its attention to human society, and has found a place on this planet ten miles square where a decent man can live in decency, comfort and security, supporting and educating his children unspoiled and unpolluted ; a place where age is reverenced...
Page 243 - A sense of duty pursues us ever. It is omnipresent, like the Deity. If we take to ourselves the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, duty performed, or duty violated, is still with us, for our happiness or our misery. If we say the darkness shall cover us, in the darkness as in the light our obligations are yet with us.
Page 43 - And then consider the great historical fact that for three centuries this book has been woven into the life of all that is best and noblest in English history; that it has become the national epic of Britain, and is as familiar to noble and simple, from John o...
Page 237 - My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain.
Page 114 - I have lived, sir, a long time, and the longer I live the more convincing proofs I see of this truth, that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid ? We have been assured, 'sir, in the sacred writings, that, 'except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it.
Page 90 - Her freedom and her power have, for more than twenty centuries, been annihilated; her people have degenerated into timid slaves; lier language, into a barbarous jargon; her temples have been given up to the successive depredations of Romans, Turks, and Scotchmen : but her intellectual empire is imperishable. And when...

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