King Lear, ed. by C.E. Moberly

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Page 89 - And to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind. Methinks I should know you, and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly ignorant What place this is; and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia.
Page 81 - Come on, sir; here's the place: — stand still. — How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 25 - These late eclipses in the sun and moon portend no good to us : Though the wisdom of nature can reason it thus and thus, yet nature finds itself scourged by the sequent effects...
Page 35 - Hear, Nature, hear ! dear goddess, hear ! Suspend thy purpose, if thou didst intend To make this creature fruitful ! Into her womb convey sterility ! Dry up in her the organs of increase, And from her derogate body never spring A babe to honour her ! If she must teem...
Page 18 - Lear. Let it be so : thy truth, then, be thy dower. For, by the sacred radiance of the sun, The mysteries of Hecate, and the night, By all the operation of the orbs From whom we do exist, and cease to be...
Page 62 - Is man no more than this? Consider him well. Thou owest the worm no silk, the beast no hide, the sheep no wool, the cat no perfume. — Ha ! here's three on's are sophisticated ! — Thou art the thing itself : unaccommodated man is no more but such a poor, bare, forked animal as thou art.
Page 16 - Our daughters' several dowers, that future strife May be prevented now. The princes, France and Burgundy, Great rivals in our youngest daughter's love, Long in our court have made their amorous sojourn, And here are to be answer'd. Tell me, my daughters, Since now we will divest us both of rule, 50 Interest of territory, cares of state, Which of you shall we say doth love us most ? That we our largest bounty may extend Where nature doth with merit challenge.
Page 101 - Lear. This feather stirs ; she lives ! if it be so. It is a chance which does redeem all sorrows That ever I have felt Kent.
Page 93 - I'll kneel down, And ask of thee forgiveness; so we'll live, // And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh At gilded butterflies, and hear poor rogues Talk of court news; and we'll talk with them too, Who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out; And take...
Page 102 - The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say. The oldest hath borne most : we that are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long.

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