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PARK COUNTY ROD AND GUN CLUB,

Livingston, Mont., February 22, 1961. Senator CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Senate Building, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR ANDERSON: We urge that you do everything within your power to support S. 174, the wilderness bill.

Wilderness areas as well as recreation areas are fast disappearing and something must be done to preserve what we now have for the future.

There is no need to go into any lengthy discussion in regard to the bill. We feel it is a good bill and every effort should be made to see that it becomes the law. Again we ask that you help the many people interested in this bill and work for its passage. Yours truly,

HAROLD SHAMSTROM, Secretary.

ORADELL, N.J., February 24, 1961. Hon. WILLIAM B. WIDNALL, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR CONGRESSMAN: As individuals, members of the Hackensack Audubon Society fully endorse the present version of S. 174, of the wilderness bill, and strongly urge its passage during this session of Congress. A similar letter has been sent to Senator Clinton P. Anderson, requesting that it be made a part of the hearings record on this bill. Respectfully yours,

HENRY S. FISHER,
Chairman, Conservation Committee,

Hackensack Audubon Society.

NAMPA, IDAHO, February 8, 1961. Senator CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Chairman, Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR ANDERSON : First, I would like to express my gratitude to you for introducing S. 174, the new wilderness bill, in this session of the Congress. I believe all thoughtful and unselfish Americans share my feeling that it is well worthwhile to preserve some small parts of our land in their natural state, and that their value will increase tremendously with the passing of time.

Second, I would like to request that this letter in support of the wilderness bill be made a part of the record of the hearing on it to be held later this month.

Third, and finally, I would like to mention a point that, so far, I have not heard in discussions of the wilderness bill: All of the land that might possibly be included is considerably less than half as much as the Government gave the railroads during the period from 1850 to 1871. Surely, if we could afford to give away 128 million acres of the public domain then, we can afford to keep some 55 million acres of it now. The need for transportation 100 years ago was obvious, but the need for peace, for quiet, for solitude, for a spot in which to refresh the mind and rekindle the spirit is as obvious now-and it is a need that can only become more urgent as the pressures of an ever increasing population grow. Sincerely yours,

TED TRUEBLOOD.

SEATTLE, WASH., February 23, 1961. Senator CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Chairman, Senate Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR: It is my_understanding that the wilderness bill (S. 174) hearings are scheduled for February 27 and 28. I am writing to you to urge support of this bill. I have visited many of the areas that are affected by this bill. Year by year it becomes more apparent that we must do everything that we can to save the few remaining wilderness areas in this country from the encroachment of the machine age with its mechanization, chemicals, and pollution. Where, but in our wilderness areas will the scientist of the future be able to study the true cycle of nature? In other areas, the land is torn up by machines; insects and plants are killed by chemicals; and the air and water are polluted by industrial waste. Even today, we are affected by the greed and mismanagement of the past generations, because they plundered, burned, and laid to waste so much of our beautiful country. We must take steps to preserve the remaining wilderness areas and tighten all the loopholes in our laws that might give the wrong individual the opportunity to enter these areas for commercial purposes. It is imperative that these areas are protected, otherwise it will be impossible in a few short years, to visualize what they were before civilization destroyed them. It makes one very sad to see some of the areas we have already lost to commerce. Their only concern is to strip the area of its last valuable item, and then leave it in shambles. The land they laid to waste remains for years as if some blight had killed all the vegetation, except the weeds. I have seen even the birds and animals leave areas that have been logged.

Buildings must also be limited and regulated in these areas, otherwise, some hideous structure is erected that is incongrous with its surroundings. I hope you will encourage support of this bill. Thank you. Respectfully yours,

MARGARET B. BATTLES.

TACOMA, WASH., February 25, 1961. SENATOR CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Chairman, Senate Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR ANDERSON : Lumber interests place a price on a tree in relation to the profit it will bring them. They have already tied up huge blocks of land for this purpose and are still not satisfied. Yet it is known that when the lumberman enters an area, the wilderness there is destroyed forever. Thus the question is merely one of values. Can we afford to let our few remaining wilderness areas be destroyed ? It is said that man cannot live by bread alone. What shall it profit a man if his pockets are full, but he has no joy in living? I believe that our scenic wilderness areas should be guarded more carefully than all the gold in Fort Knox, since they are a God-given treasure of far greater value. As a step in the right direction I support S. 174. Very truly yours,

ROBERT W. KLOSTER.

WALLACE, IDAHO, February 21, 1961. Hon. HENRY C. DWORSHAK, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.:

We sincerely urge you to oppose S. 174, commonly known as the wilderness bill.

This bill would largely prohibit commercial enterprises of any kind within the so-called wilderness system, which includes an area in the Western States of more than 50,000 square miles. No timber may be harvested, no grazing permitted except under special conditions, no reservoirs or other conservation works constructed except with Presidential approval, no permanent roads may be built and no prospecting or mining except under special conditions requiring explicit Presidential permission and regulation.

Since permanent roads into the wilderness area are prohibited and since use of motor vehicles or motorboats is forbidden except in the boundary water area of Superior national forests, Minnesota, the area is actually set aside for the enjoyment of a relatively small percentage of our people who can afford to employ guides and pack animals to carry them into remote areas.

Our public lands should be maintained for the good of the general public and not be reserved for a single-purpose wilderness use. Development in the State of Idaho and other States is dependent upon development of the natural resources for each State.

The National Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission will report on this issue in September and their report should be available and studied before legislation with respect to S. 174 is considered. I urge you to accept the views contained herein.

L. J. RANDALL, President Idaho Mining Association.

CAMP FIRE GIRLS,

Spokane, Wash., February 23, 1961. Senator CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Chairman, Senate Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SIR: As a lover of the unspoiled beauty of this land, I urge you to sup port the wilderness bill, S. 174. Too much of our country has already been irrevocably ruined in deference to commercial interests. I am appalled to see the waste and desolation left behind by these who have cut great swaths in Northwest forests. It is evident that much of the destruction of our great forests has been done in haste_haste prompted by the need to satisfy immediate de mands, demands seemingly so pressing that a long look into a rather bleak future could not be taken.

Those of us who want our wilderness areas preserved through this bill are quite aware of the role played by our natural resources in the national economy, and do not seek to deny the country proper use of those resources. We do want these people who have the power to preserveor destroy—to use great caution and care in their decisions. We want those people to resist immediate demands by commercial groups, and take the long view—the view which affects not only ourselves, but more especially future generations of Americans. Will they be able to see and know the beauty and peace of mountain, lake, and stream? Or will they be forced to resort to picture books to know the glory that once was ours? Sincerely,

ANN COMAN CRAWFORD, Camp Director.

FALLON, NEV., February 21, 1961. Senate Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.: (Attention: Clinton P. Anderson).

At the official record of the hearing on legislative bill S. 174, please include our vote opposing it.

CHURCHILL COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

WALLACE, IDAHO. Hon. CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Chairman, Senate Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.:

We sincerely urge you to oppose S. 174, commonly known as the wilderness bill.

This bill would largely prohibit commercial enterprises of any kind within the so-called wilderness system, which includes an area in the Western States of more than 50,000 square miles. No timber may be harvested, no grazing permitted except under special conditions, no reservoirs or other conservation works constructed except with Presidential approval, no permanent roads may be built and no prospecting or mining except under special conditions requiring explicit Presidential permission and regulation.

Since permanent roads into the wilderness area are prohibited and since use of motor vehicles or motorboats is forbidden except in the boundary water area of Superior National Forests, Minn., the area is actually set aside for the enjoyment of a relatively small percentage of our people who can afford to employ guides and pack animals to carry them into remote areas.

Our public lands should be maintained for the good of the general public and not be reserved for a single-purpose wilderness use. Development in the State of Idaho and other States is dependent upon development of the natural resources for each State.

The National Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission will report on this issue in September and their report should be available and studied before legislation with respect to S. 174 is considered. I urge you to accept the views contained herein.

L. J. RANDALL, Presidenti, Hecla Mining Co. and Idaho Mining Association.

HAINING LUMBER Co., INC.,

Williams, Ariz., February 17, 1961. Hon. CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Chairman of Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR ANDERSON : I wish to congratulate you on Senate bill 174 to establish a national wilderness preservation system for the permanent good of the whole people and for other purposes.

I am very much in favor of this Wilderness Act bill and will give it my whole hearted support. I ask you, Senator, to continue your support of this bill in order that we may establish a national wilderness preservation system for present and future generations. Very truly yours,

H. E. CRAIN.

THE GARDEN CLUB OF GEORGIA, INC.,

Augusta, Ga., February 22, 1961. Hon. CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Senator of New Mexico, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR ANDERSON: As president of the Garden Club of Georgia, and representing over 22,000 women, I wish to endorse the wilderness bill S. 174.

It is most important that our great wilderness areas be preserved, and I would like for it to go on record, as Georgia is conservation-minded, that this bill has our hearty endorsement. Very truly yours,

Mrs.. EDWIN D. FULCHER, President.

ILLINOIS AUDUBON SOCIETY,
CHICAGO NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM,

Chicago, Ill., February 21, 1961.
Senator CLINTON ANDERSON,
Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.

SIR: We should like the following statement inserted in the hearings on the National Wilderness Preservation Act:

“The Illinois Audubon Society has displayed an interest in the enactment of legislation to establish a national wilderness preservation system for many years. We can only deplore the many delays over this badly needed legislation.

"We feel that establishment of wilderness by law is the only sure means of preserving it. We have been fortunate that many Federal administrators have been in sympathy with the concept of wilderness. This may not always be the case. Wilderness at present hangs by the mere thread of bureaucratic favor. We do not look upon this situation with comfort.

"It should be the declared policy of the U.S. Congress, acting for the people of the United States of America, that wilderness is desirable. We have little enough of original America left. Every day sees more of it disappear under the relentless power of the bulldozer. The term “population explosion” has become commonplace, and it becomes increasingly obvious that unless this Congress acts to preserve some of our lovely heritage, we shall have none to show to future generations. America, the beautiful, must be more than a phrase.” We would appreciate this statement to be placed in the official hearings. Very truly,

RAYMOND MOSTEK, Vice President.

BAKERSFIELD, CALIF., February 24, 1961. Senator CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Chairman, Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, Senate Office Building,

Washington, D.C.: Please give the pending wilderness bill your wholehearted support as we, the directors of the Kern County (Calif.) Fish & Game Protective Associations are doing.

C. 0. TODAHL, President.

BAKERSFIELD, CALIF., February 24, 1961. Senator CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, Senate Office Building,

Washington, D.C.: The Sportsmen Council of Central California supports the wilderness bill, S. 174, which comes up for hearing. It is vital to our Nation's future in propagating, protecting and conserving our wildlife and national resources. We urge your support. Preservation of scenic and recreational areas are important to future generations.

HOMEB HARRISON, President.

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., February 24, 1961. Senator CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Chairman, Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.O.:

The 10,000 members of the Associated Sportsmen of California favor the wilderness bill 100 percent. We urge its enactment.

JOHN VAN ASSEN, President.

VANCOUVER, WASH., February 24, 1961. Senator CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Senate Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, Washington, D.C.:

We of the Oregon Cascade Conservation Council stand firmly behind you in your support of wilderness bill, S. 174.

RECTOR JOHNSON, President.
GUIDO RAHB, Vice President.

IZAAK WALTON LEAGUE OF AMERICA, INO.,

Kent, Ohio, February 23, 1961. Hon. CLINTON P. ANDERSON, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SIR: It is my understanding that your committee is meeting on February 27 and 28, at which time Senate bill 174, wilderness bill, will be considered.

My convictions are that all our marginal lands (marginal with respect to the renewable resources) be acquired and allowed to revert to their natural characteristics for the enjoyment and use of posterity. Such lands not to be exploited for any use other than their recreational use, or to prevent the waste of a renewable resource, except where a positive need of our own people incontrovertibly proved. Such areas to be put into such condition as to facilitate reversion to its wilderness characteristics in the shortest period of time after the compulsory need has passed.

As a large step forward in this direction, I favor the passage of Senate bill 174. Sincerely yours,

LESLIE SKUTLE, Secretary.

BRONX, N.Y., February 23, 1961. Hon. Senator ANDERSON, Chairman, Senate Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SIR : Speaking as an individual, I am sincerely for the passing of the wilderness bill. I believe that the American public is basically for the preservation of its natural resources. The wilderness bill is so set up, that it will provide adequate protection for the conservation of wildlife and wilderness areas, without intervention from spoilers. The areas concerned with, actually represent a very small percentage of wild areas in our country. Mining, oil

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