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I liked this book set in 1940s Algeria. Mersault's isolation and indifference to others and his own fate was creepy and thought-provoking.

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Did Meursault’s mother actually die? Was what Meursault and his mother considered Margengo actually Marengo? Were they victims of gerrymandering? Did Meursault ever see his mother’s body?
Marie
seems kind of planned. Where did Meursault and Marie plan on spending the night together?
Raymond like Tom of The Great Gatsby, is greedy. Raymond cannot have the faithfulness of his mistress when their relationship is based primarily on his infidelity. He is willing to use the innocence of Meursault to lure his mistress, whose relations with Raymond are as stated earlier based on infidelity, all just to have further retaliation on her infidelity in their already egregious relationship. Raymond’s problems are his greed and his perception. Raymond believes that his mistress must remain faithful irrespective of his other possible relationships.
The policeman is egregious in using authority to address a personal matter which evinces his character and lack of faithfulness to his already personally and religiously defined relationship.
It seems to me that Meursault is a homosexual tangled in relations of infidelity and that Marie is in search of a faithful emotional relationship with a man yet seeking promiscuity and infidelity in her sexual relationships.
In the defense of the mistress, Raymond deserved some type of reprimanding for his behavior towards his mistress, greed, egregious oppression of his mistresses’ decisions to engage in other unfaithful types of relationships due to her lack of fidelity in any of her relationships. Masson may have lured Raymond, Marie and Meursault to the spring for their personal reprimanding of their behavior. Raymond’s bigotry for and retaliation towards any male person of darker skin pigmentation could have been galvanized due to this situation. The ethnic background from Raymond’s mistress’s brother was never explicitly discussed as a result.
Arabs at a Spring is a very vague statement. The family of Raymond’s mistress could have been mulatto, negro or other types of ethnic groups stereotypically featuring darker skin pigmentation. Arabs at a Spring ironically insinuates the recent Arab Spring of the Middle East and North Africa, social movements and collective action designed to instigate political change. The Chaplain himself should know not to accuse anyone of atheism but to present the Word of God and to allow the hearer of the word to make his or her own decision. The Bible says "the day you hear the word of God, harden not your heart. The Chaplain was wrong in this situation.
Meursault’s decision to shoot the brother of Raymond’s mistress is quite unexpected. The subject in the courthouse should have stayed on the crime Meursault has committed. Nothing else. The prosecutor has NO right to judge Meursault. The courtroom is intended to address crimes which the accused must address. HOW does the prosecutor and anyone else believe that it is appropriate to JUDGE Meursault’s character? They are supposed to judge the crime not the character.
The “gentle indifference of the world” is the indifference or lack of care which the society which Meursault engaged with on a daily basis exhibited clearly. Meursault seemed loving enough to be engaged with a woman despite his homosexuality and may have been indifferent about the “death” of his mother due to the fact that he no longer engaged with her on a daily basis due to the distance which separated them and his acceptance of her state of health. It seems as though the society which Meursault engaged with on a daily basis became his “accusers of bretheren” and used the excuse of his crime to judge his character not his action, thus becoming his “accusers of bretheren”. Salamano’s and Salamano’s mangy dog could represent Meursault’s Father and Mother.
Arabs at a Spring is a very vague statement. The family of Raymond’s mistress could have been mulatto, negro or other types of ethnic groups stereotypically featuring darkers skin pigmentation. Arabs at a Spring ironically
 

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The Stranger by Albert Camus is a book about a man that is really indifferent to everything. He really doesn't seem to care for anything or anybody. In the beginning he finds out that his grandmother died and he wasn't sad nor was he happy. Then when he went to the funeral, everything was awkward to him and people were curious about him not knowing about his grandmother or caring about her. His girlfriend Marie really loves Meursalt and wants him to marry her but he seems that he really doesn't care because he says that it doesn't matter but he still says yes because he can't think of a reason not to.
When Maman died, Meursault's only regret was that he had to sit in the burning sun for an extended amount of time. He couldn’t even remember the date that she died, or her age. The dramatic first lines of this book immediately brings the realization that Meursault has no feeling for his mother. "Maman died today. Or yesterday maybe, I don't know." The extent of Meursault's lack of mourning is not as clear until Monsieur Thomas Perez is introduced. While Meursault is complaining about the sun, Monsieur Perez is fighting his physical illness to keep up with the funeral procession. Perez's feelings toward Maman were so strong that he was allowed, against the rules of the funeral home, to attend the grave viewing. The extent of Perez's grieving, paired with Meursault's annoyance toward the event, illuminates Meursault's lack of sorrow.
When Marie first enters the book it seems that Meursault has feelings for her, but that assumption is haard to realize now. His thoughts of Marie are always physical. He never mentions her personality, her habits, or her qualities that make him want to be with her. Instead, he focuses on her body and how he wants it, making it clear that that is the reason he loves her.
Raymond asked Meursalt to write a letter to his ex wife that tricks her so he can go see her and then beat her because she cheated on him.Then when the police comes Meursalt is a witness and says that the woman did wrong so he had a reason to beat her. But then all of this leads to Meursalt killing a man. After Raymond beats the woman her brother goes after him and then Meursalt just happened to have Raymond's gun on him and he shot the man once and then five more times,killing him. The only excuse ge had was the sun glaring in his eyes which caused him to have to move closer.
During the trial Meursalt got questioned more about his mother's death than about the shooting. They made multiple comments about him not showing grief when he was at his mother's funeral. Then it makes him look like a monster that doesn't give a care in the world about anything.When Marie visits Meursault in prison, he comments on her appearance, but not on how her presence or how she was thoughtful enough to visit him. "Already pressed up against the grate, she was smiling her best smile for me. I thought she looked very beautiful..."
Camus made Muersalt a person that doesn't worry about or care for anybody at all and acts as nothing matters to him. This is a very unique book but kind of weird at the same time. I recommend everybody to read this book because it is very interesting. This book is one of the biggest novels by Albert Camus.
 

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A very simple book that studies crime and punishment in a random universe. At least that's what I got out of it.
"I lay my heart open to the benign indifference of the universe."
Brilliant!

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37. The Stranger, byAlbert Camus. 110 pages. I read this because Camus is an existentialist, and I heard he was famous for this text. It is a good read, and is probably full of symbolism and other goodies I chose to ignore. A good story! I gave this *** Three stars.

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A book to be lived in the present. Albert Camus strips down the unnecessities of a complex story line to bring Meursault's simplistic view on the world to life. In an unapologetic tone Meursault relives his memories in the present only to displace them as no longer important. He is quested to "get a maximum return on [his] thoughts" (114). Albeit not an existentialist novel by Camus' own definition, the Stranger does explore many of the principle ideasl of existentialist philosophy.
Matt Ward's translation appeals to this notion of presence. The short, jutted, sentences keep the pace moving with an type-writer like metronomic rhythm.
 

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This book is boring and useless. What is the purpose of this book? The main character is a man that has nothing to do and no meaning in life. Is not that his sorrounding was messed up, he was messed up. He had no sense of life.

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I wasn't a huge fan of the book. I thought it was rather weird actually, which I guess is to be expected since it was my first taste of Camus's existentialist writing style. I would consider reading something else by him because maybe i didn't give it enough of a chance.

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The first three pages of Part One appear to be missing.

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