The Works of William Robertson: To which is Prefixed an Account of His Life and Writings

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Frederick Westley and A.H. Davis; Stereotyped and printed by J.R. and C. Childs, 1835 - America - 1184 pages

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Page liv - Wherewith shall I come before the Lord, and bow myself before the high God ? shall I come before him with burnt offerings, with calves of a year old ? Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams, or with ten thousands of rivers of oil t shall I give my first-born for my transgression, the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul...
Page liv - Wherewith shall I come before the Lord, And bow myself before the high God ? Shall I come before him with burnt offerings, With calves of a year old ? Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams, Or with ten thousands of rivers of oil ? Shall I give my firstborn for my transgression, The fruit of my body for the sin of my soul...
Page 183 - ... them, we are apt altogether to forget her frailties, we think of her faults with less indignation, and approve of our tears, as if they were shed for a person who had attained much nearer to pure virtue.
Page 315 - A general consternation seized mankind ; many relinquished their possessions, and, abandoning their friends and families, hurried with precipitation to the Holy Land, where they imagined that Christ would quickly appear to judge the world...
Page 221 - ... deep grief and sorrow : nor does it seem possible to make her forget the same. Still she repeats these words,
Page 312 - If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.
Page 183 - Tmpatient of contradiction; because she had been accustomed from her infancy to be treated as a queen. No stranger, on some occasions, to dissimulation; which, in that perfidious court where she received her education, was reckoned among the necessary arts of government.
Page 224 - ... herself ; for that they discourse of some things which were unknown to any other than to herself and Bothwell ; and as it is hard to counterfeit so many, so the matter of them, and the manner how these men came by them is such, as it seemeth that God, in whose sight murder and bloodshed of the innocent is abominable, would not permit the same to be hid or concealed.
Page 312 - Famine, and pestilence, which always march in the train of war, when it ravages with such inconsiderate cruelty, raged in every part of Europe, and completed its sufferings. If a man were called on to fix upon the period in the history of the world...
Page 331 - ... ought to have been. All the languages in Europe, during the period under review, were barbarous ; they were destitute of elegance, of force, and even of perspicuity. No attempt had been hitherto made to improve or to polish them. The Latin tongue was consecrated by the Church to religion ; custom, with authority scarcely less sacred, had appropriated it to literature. All the...

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